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I sometimes want to pick a range of commits from a different repository. I know two ways to do that.

  1. cherry-pick begin..end

or

  1. git rebase --onto myBranch begin end

I find the first version easier to remember. However, I read a lot about how cherry-picking is evil compared to merging because it kinda breaks the history. But what I haven't figured out yet is if there is a difference between cherry-picking a range of commits or rebasing them with --onto

I tend to think that there shouldn't be a difference. Am I mistaken?

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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

These two commands are equivalent, you're just doing the work that a normal rebase would do to figure out the unmerged commits to replay onto the target branch.

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When you are doing rebase --onto? Cherry picking should also detect already applied patches. –  Let_Me_Be Jul 11 '12 at 8:38
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Rebasing and cherry-picking are just as 'bad' for merges. They both result in forgetting the IDs of the original commits for the changes you pick up; as a result, later merges may attempt to apply the same changes more than once.

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"They both result in forgetting the IDs of the original commits for the changes you pick up; as a result, later merges may attempt to apply the same changes more than once." - This is incorrect –  Paul Betts Jul 11 '12 at 8:30
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@PaulBetts, how so? The original IDs aren't recorded; there are some heuristics to try to detect and elide double applications, but fundamentally if you merge branches A and A' (where A' is the result of rebasing or cherry picking A onto some other head), you're running the risk of getting extra merge conflicts, and you'll definitely have duplicate commits in the history –  bdonlan Jul 12 '12 at 2:34
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Actually, cherry-picking is less evil in this respect than rebasing. Cherry picking will create duplicates of commits, while rebasing will actually move them (thus rewriting history).

Both are more evil then merging, which in my honest opinion is usually the worst choice.

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Rebasing doesn't "move" commits –  Paul Betts Jul 11 '12 at 8:31
    
Are you saying merging is the worst choice? Even though it's the least evil? –  Max Nanasy May 8 '13 at 16:25
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