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I have a text file containing entries similar to the following example:

# 8 rows of header
---------------------------------------------
123 ABC12345 A some more variable length text
456 DEF12345 A some more variable length text
789 GHI12345 B some more variable length text
987 JKL12345 A some more variable length text
654 MNO12345 B some more variable length text
321 PQR12345 B some more variable length text
etc...

What I would like to achieve is:

  1. Convert the As into 1s, the Bs into 0s in order to have a binary number For the example above this would be 110100 (i.e. AABABB)
  2. Convert this binary number into a decimal number For the example above this would then be 52
  3. Map this decimal number to a text string (i.e. 52 = "Case 1" or 53 = "Case 2" etc.) and
  4. Print this on the stdout

I have a little bit of Python experience but the problem above is way beyond my capabilities. Therefore any help from the community would be appreciated. Many thanks in advance, Hib

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2  
You need to finish defining the problem before you can find the solution. –  Ignacio Vazquez-Abrams Jul 11 '12 at 9:02
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4 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Something like this should work (not tested):

from itertools import islice

binary_map = dict(zip("AB", "10"))  # Equivalent to {"A": "1", "B": "0"}
string_map = {52: "Case 1", 53: "Case 2"}

with open("my_text_file") as f:
    binary_str = "".join(binary_map[x.split()[2]] for x in islice(f, 9, None))

binary_value = int(binary_string, 2)
print string_map[binary_value]

I'll break down the indented code line for you and explain it.

  • The join method of an empty string will concatenate the strings given in the argument, so "".join(["A", "B", "C"]) is equal to "ABC".
  • We pass this method a so-called generator expression, X for Y in Z. It has the same syntax as a list comprehension, except the square brackets are omitted.
  • The islice function returns an iterator that silently skips the first 9 lines of the file object f, so it yields lines starting with the 10th.
  • The split method of str with no arguments will split on any sequence of whitespace characters (space, tab ("\t"), linefeed ("\n") and carriage return ("\r")) and return a list. So for example, " a \t b\n\t c\n".split() is equal to ['a', 'b', 'c']. We're interested in the third column, x.split()[2], which is either "A" or "B".
  • Looking up this value in the binary_map dictionary will give us either "1" or "0" instead.
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I would use itertools.islice to skip the first 8 lines. –  jamylak Jul 11 '12 at 9:07
    
@jamylak Good idea, updated. –  Lauritz V. Thaulow Jul 11 '12 at 9:10
    
Many thanks to all of you and especially for the code explanation. This was extremely helpful. I managed to get the script running in the end and to produce the output I needed. –  user1517125 Jul 11 '12 at 10:00
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A few pointers (assuming Python 2):

Translating a string:

>>> import string
>>> table = string.maketrans("AB","10")
>>> translated = "AABABB".translate(table)
>>> translated
'110100'

Converting to base 10:

>>> int(translated, 2)
52

No idea how you would map that to those arbitrary strings - more information needed.

Printing to stdout - really? Which part are you having trouble with?

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a.txt:

# 8 rows of header







123 ABC12345 A some more variable length text
456 DEF12345 A some more variable length text
789 GHI12345 B some more variable length text
987 JKL12345 A some more variable length text
654 MNO12345 B some more variable length text
321 PQR12345 B some more variable length text

you can try this:

>>> int(''.join([line.split(' ')[2] for line in open('a.txt', 'r').readlines()[8:]]).replace('A', '1').replace('B', '0'), 2)
>>> 52

As for mapping the int to a string, not sure what you mean.

>>> value = {int(''.join([line.split(' ')[2] for line in open('a.txt', 'r').readlines()[8:]]).replace('A', '1').replace('B', '0'), 2): 'case 52'}  
>>> value[52]
'case 52'
>>> 
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Fitting everything on one line is not the primary goal you should be aiming for :) –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 11 '12 at 9:22
    
@TimPietzcker lol yes, I guess I do it out of habit and because it tends to be popular, but this are very poor excuses, I may just be infatuated with the fact that python allows me to do such a thing ;) –  Samy Vilar Jul 11 '12 at 9:47
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I used re module in order to check the format of the lines to be accepted:

>>> def map_file_to_string(string):
    values = []
    for line in string.split('\n'):
        if re.match(r'\d{3} \w{3}\d{5} [AB] .*', line):
            values.append(1 if line[13] == 'A' else 0)
    return dict_map[int(''.join(map(str, values)), 2)]

>>> dict_map = {52: 'Case 1', 53: 'Case 2'}
>>> s1 = """# 8 rows of header
---------------------------------------------
123 ABC12345 A some more variable length text
456 DEF12345 A some more variable length text
789 GHI12345 B some more variable length text
987 JKL12345 A some more variable length text
654 MNO12345 B some more variable length text
321 PQR12345 B some more variable length text
etc.."""
>>> map_file_to_string(s1)
'Case 1'
>>> 
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