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When I run this program I get output as 2

#include<iostream.h>
#include<conio.h>
void main(){
    clrscr();
    int a = 10;
    int c = a-- - --a;
    cout<<c;
    getch();
}

... but when I just modify it to

#include<iostream.h>
#include<conio.h>
void main(){
    clrscr();
    int a = 10,c;
    c = a-- - --a;
    cout<<c;
    getch();
}

... I get output 0. WHY? In java both the of them gave output as 2. Whats wrong with C++? Explain :(

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1  
Nothing is wrong with C++ but everything is wrong with your code. Check this : stackoverflow.com/questions/4176328/… –  Prasoon Saurav Jul 11 '12 at 9:48
    
weekly UB question.. –  Blue Moon Jul 11 '12 at 9:48
    
@KingsIndian pretty sure you mean daily. –  Luchian Grigore Jul 11 '12 at 9:49
    
haha...On a serious note: OP might want to read this for why it's not an issue in Java. –  Blue Moon Jul 11 '12 at 9:51
    
Besides, the only correct signatures for main are int main(int, char**) and int main(). DON'T NEVER WRITE void main(), it just hurts our eyes. –  akappa Jul 11 '12 at 9:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Nothing wrong with C++, but there's something wrong in how you're using it.

The expression a-- - --a has undefined behavior in C++, and anything can happen.

The cleanest solution is to not write code like that (I wouldn't do it even if it were legal).

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... but its a part of my school syllabus and the book we are following has some parts dedicated to this prefix and postfix stuff. What to do? –  Souradeep Nanda Jul 11 '12 at 9:51
    
@SouradeepNanda fight the system! –  Luchian Grigore Jul 11 '12 at 9:53
    
This has nothing to do with the operators in themselves, it's a matter of expression evaluation (that is: don't use two or more of them in the same expression, because you don't know how the expression will be evaluated). –  akappa Jul 11 '12 at 9:53
    
Prefix and postfix operators are useful, but you should only use them one at a time. –  Bo Persson Jul 11 '12 at 9:54
    
Yeah, I removed the java tag. I wish I could vote it up but it requires 15 reputation. Thanks anyways :D –  Souradeep Nanda Jul 11 '12 at 10:03

To elaborate a bit on Luchian's answer. In C++, the order in which sub-expressions are evaluated inside an expression is not specified. This means that in the following expression:

int c = a-- - --a;

there are two equally valid evaluation orders.

  1. Evaluate a-- first (returns 10), then --a (returns 8), then substract (returns 2).
  2. Evaluate --a first (returns 9), then a-- (returns 9), then substract (returns 0).

This is meant to improve optimisation oportunities for compilers. Naturally, this means that in C++ it is a mistake to use expressions that depend on evaluation order, because there is no way to know which order the compiler will select. The trade-off between efficiency and error avoidance is different in C++ and in Java.

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excellent answer: concise, complete and to-the-point. –  akappa Jul 11 '12 at 9:58

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