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in C++, a function can be defined to be inline using inline key word. It is like the programmer has requested from the compiler to insert the complete body of the function in every place that the function is called.

But as I know compilers are not obligated to respect this request. So is there any way to guarantee that a function is inlined?

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1  
I don't think that you can guarantee that. The inline keyword is just a recommendation for the compiler. –  Eitan T Jul 11 '12 at 9:55
5  
Trust the optimiser to do its job. –  Rook Jul 11 '12 at 9:57
1  
See Herb Sutter's Inline Redux –  Peter Wood Jul 11 '12 at 10:10
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@Mike Are you actually expecting to outsmart the optimiser when it comes to inlining? Isn’t this one of the core competences of modern optimisers? OK, when it comes to things like auto-vectorisation and certain kinds of branch prediction, modern optimisers still struggle. But for inlining? –  Konrad Rudolph Jul 11 '12 at 10:13
2  
Anyway, I agree that normally there's no point doing this. I certainly wouldn't agree with any kind of claim that it's therefore not worth doing it ever. Stuff like this is worth doing a few times, if only to convince yourself it's not worth doing again. So I don't really agree with the "blindly trust the compiler" tone of some of the comments before yours. It's interesting that your experience and Mysticial's directly contradict. It's possible that someone's using the wrong flags, but otherwise maybe you work on very different kinds of code, and yours optimizes better than his. –  Steve Jessop Jul 11 '12 at 10:38

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Use __forceinline in VC++ and __attribute__((always_inline)) in g++

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1  
__forceinline does not actually force inlining at all. Read the documentation. –  Puppy Jul 11 '12 at 10:00
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@DeadMG: As far as I can make out, it forces inlining if possible; and it seems obvious to me that nothing can force it when it's not possible. –  Mike Seymour Jul 11 '12 at 10:09
    
@MikeSeymour: Indeed. So the answer is "It's not possible to guarantee it". –  Puppy Jul 11 '12 at 11:55
    
@DeadMG: For an ultra-pedantic definition of "guarantee" as "do it even if it's impossible", that's correct but useless. For a more sensible definition of "do it if possible", this is a useful answer. –  Mike Seymour Jul 11 '12 at 12:05
    
I would more argue that "guarantee" involves "Do it, always". As __forceinline is not always, then it's not a guarantee. The reason why it's not a guarantee is interesting, but does not change the fact that it is not a guarantee. –  Puppy Jul 11 '12 at 12:07

Nope. Actually inlining a function is a complete implementation detail, and many functions cannot be inlined. This makes the existence of an inline forcing mechanism impossible. Even compilers that offer keywords like __forceinline (VC++) won't inline functions with that qualifier under some circumstances. And the page carries a very apt warning about misusing this qualifier.

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As this isn't covered by the standard, it depends on the compiler you're using. The compiler's documentation will tell you if there is a feature for forcing a function to be inlined, and how to use it. The documentation should also tell you the limits of that feature, such as for recursive calls in a non-tail position.

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If you are using a Microsoft compiler, you may use __forceinline, as explained here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/z8y1yy88%28v=vs.71%29.aspx

I do not know of a way to force inlining in g++ or other compilers.

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Read the page you linked. It quite clearly states that even using __forceinline will not actually force the compiler to inline it. –  Puppy Jul 11 '12 at 9:58
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There is nothing specifically wrong in this answer... –  Kirill Kobelev Jul 11 '12 at 10:01
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Except the suggestion that __forceinline guarantees that the compiler inlines things, which is definitely wrong. –  Puppy Jul 11 '12 at 10:01
    
@DeadMG: Are you just complaining that the answer doesn't explicitly say that it will only work if inlining is possible? Or are you saying that __forceinline doesn't mean "inline the function if possible". –  Mike Seymour Jul 11 '12 at 10:08
    
That page is rather out of date, as it refers to VS 2003. (Hopefully, inline doesn't force internal name binding in more recent compilers.) –  James Kanze Jul 11 '12 at 10:11

I cannot imagine that there´s a way to do that. It is mainly dependant on the compiler. Another solution would be to use #define macro to define your function

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Do you think using a Macro has advantages over using an inline function (other than wt u concerned here) –  Kadiam Jul 11 '12 at 10:09
    
@Kasnel: using a macro will force the code to be inlined (since it's directly pasted inline before compilation); but it almost certainly won't give any advantage in most circumstances, and has many disadvantages of its own. –  Mike Seymour Jul 11 '12 at 10:12
    
well, at least its cross compiler, so +1, compared to __forceinline. it won't give yu performance advantage, but I'd disagree with @Mike Seymour, that in most cases such directives don't cause problems. Its just not so much for c++ suitable –  Moataz Elmasry Jul 11 '12 at 10:17

By putting the definition of a function right into its declaration in the header, the function gets the highest chances to be inlined.

class TheClass
{
public:
    static void DoSomething () // declaration
    {
        // the function's code (definition) goes here
    };
};

// in the same header..

void DoOtherThings () // declaration
{
    // the function's code (definition) goes here
}

In any case, there is no strong guarantee, perhaps even if you use the compiler-specific keyword for inline forcing.

A 100% percent guarantee would be transforming your function into a C++ macro and using the macro instead of referring to the function. If you function has multiple lines, place a \ (a space followed by a backslash) where you want to have a line break in your "macro-function".

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What does "By putting the definition of a function right into its declaration in the header" mean, apart from making it inline? –  Jonathan Wakely Jul 11 '12 at 11:00
    
@JonathanWakely Updated the answer to illustrate what was meant. –  Desmond Hume Jul 11 '12 at 11:11

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