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How can i check if item in b is in a and the found match item in a should not be use in the next matching?

Currently this code will match both 2 in b.

a = [3,2,5,4]
b = [2,4,2]

for i in b:
  if i in a:
    print "%d is in a" % i

This is the required output:

2 => 2 is in a
4 => 4 is in a
2 =>

EDIT: Example 2:

a = [3,2,2,4]
b = [2,4,2]

output should be

2 => 2 is in a
4 => 4 is in a
2 => 2 is in a
share|improve this question

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

(long post but read it entirely, solution is at the end).

Remove the found value or register it in another dict.

Better though is to count the number of apparitions inside each array and test how many are common.

For the second case, you'd have

  • for a:

    3 appears 1 times 2 appears 1 times 5 appears 1 times 4 appears 1 times

  • for b:

    2 appears 2 times 4 appears 1 times

Keep these values in dictionaries:

a_app = {3:1, 2:1, 5:1, 4:1}
b_app = {2:2, 4:1}

And now, it is simple:

for i in b:
    if a_app.has_key(i) and a_app[i] > 0:
        a_app[i] -= 1

The b_app dictionary would be used in other case.

Here is a test script I wrote (testing all testcases issued here):

def f(a, b):
    a_app = {}
    for i in a:
        if not a_app.has_key(i):
            a_app[i] = 0
        a_app[i] += 1
    print a_app
    for i in b:
        print i, '=>',
        if a_app.has_key(i) and a_app[i] > 0:
            a_app[i] -= 1
            print i, ' is in a',
        print '.'

f([1,1,2],[1,1])
f([3,2,5,4],[2,4,2])
f([3,2,2,4],[2,4,2])
f([3,2,5,4],[2,3,2])

And here is the output:

$ python 1.py
{1: 2, 2: 1}
1 => 1  is in a .
1 => 1  is in a .
{2: 1, 3: 1, 4: 1, 5: 1}
2 => 2  is in a .
4 => 4  is in a .
2 => .
{2: 2, 3: 1, 4: 1}
2 => 2  is in a .
4 => 4  is in a .
2 => 2  is in a .
{2: 1, 3: 1, 4: 1, 5: 1}
2 => 2  is in a .
3 => 3  is in a .
2 => .

Everything is perfect and no order is lost :)

Edit: Updated with @Avaris's suggestions, this script looks like:

import collections

def f(a, b):
    a_app = collections.Counter(a)
    for i in b:
        print i, '=>',
        if i in a_app and a_app[i] > 0:
            a_app[i] -= 1
            print i, ' is in a',
        print '.'
    print ''

f([1,1,2],[1,1])
f([3,2,5,4],[2,4,2])
f([3,2,2,4],[2,4,2])
f([3,2,5,4],[2,3,2])
share|improve this answer
    
Nice but loses order of the values found - not sure if that is important. –  Maria Zverina Jul 11 '12 at 11:01
    
Nop, it doesn't loose anything :) See output from tests. –  Mihai Maruseac Jul 11 '12 at 11:06
    
Nice :) ... my bad :) –  Maria Zverina Jul 11 '12 at 11:09
1  
You should use i in a_app instead of a_app.has_key(i). has_key is removed in 3.x. And for 2.7+ collections.Counter will do nicely for a_app or b_app. –  Avaris Jul 11 '12 at 11:10
    
Thanks, updated with your suggestions. –  Mihai Maruseac Jul 11 '12 at 11:15

I would do this:

a = [3,2,5,4]
b = [2,4,2]
temp = set(a)
for item in b:
    if item in temp:
        print "{0} is in a".format(item)
        temp.remove(item)

The set makes the x in y check faster (O(1) instead of (worst-case) O(n)), and it also can be modified safely without destroying my original a.

share|improve this answer
    
fails with a = [1,1,2], b = [1,1] –  Maria Zverina Jul 11 '12 at 10:49
1  
@MariaZverina: How do you mean? Output is 1 is in a - what else would you have expected? –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 11 '12 at 10:54
1  
set will modify the value of a. When my variable a=[3,2,2,4] both 2 in b should match. –  Bob Jul 11 '12 at 10:56
2  
@Bob: Then you should edit your question to specify your problem correctly. set() does not modify the value of a, by the way. –  Tim Pietzcker Jul 11 '12 at 10:58
2  
He stated it clearly: he wanted to match each value exactly once even though he had duplicates. –  Mihai Maruseac Jul 11 '12 at 11:09

Recursive solution:

a = [3,2,5,4]
b = [2,4,2]

def find_matches(x, y):
    if y == []:            # nothing more to find
        return
    n = y.pop()
    if n in x:
        print n, "matches"
        x.remove(n)
    find_matches(x, y)

find_matches(list(a), list(b))      # copy the list as they get consumed in process
share|improve this answer
    
That's wrong. Try it with b = [2,3,2]. –  Avaris Jul 11 '12 at 10:49
1  
@Avaris Good point :) Fixed now hopefully :) –  Maria Zverina Jul 11 '12 at 10:58
    
This works too. Thanks –  Bob Jul 11 '12 at 11:23
a = [3,2,5,4]
b = [2,4,2]

hadAlready = {}
for i in b:
    if i in a:
        if not (i in hadAlready):
            print "%d is in a" % i
            hadAlready[i] = 1
share|improve this answer
1  
fails with a = [1,1,2], b = [1,1] –  Maria Zverina Jul 11 '12 at 10:59

This probably isn't the best way to do it, but you could make a list of all matched items and check using that.

a= [3, 2, 5, 4]
b= [2, 4, 2]
c= []

for i in b:
    if i in a and i not in c:
        print '%d is in a' % i
        c.append(i)

I think looping over a instead of b should solve the problem.

a= [3, 2, 2, 4]
b= [2, 4, 2]

for i in a:
    if i in b:
        print i, 'is in a'

Obviously i is in a, but it does solve the problem doesn't it?

share|improve this answer
    
fails with a = [1,1,2], b = [1,1] –  Maria Zverina Jul 11 '12 at 10:50
    
Fails? How? It gives the output 1 is an a And that is the required output –  elssar Jul 11 '12 at 11:09
2  
The output should be given twice, you have two 1s in b. –  Mihai Maruseac Jul 11 '12 at 11:10
    
Ah, got it. The OP should edit the question to make that clear. –  elssar Jul 11 '12 at 11:15
    
@elssar yes, already edited. My first example is not that appropriate –  Bob Jul 11 '12 at 11:17

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