Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Example

Have a look at the following code:

private void DeDuplicateOrganisations()
{
     var profileOrgs = _organisations.Where(o => o.ExistsInProfile).ToList();
     var kvkOrgs = _organisations.Where(o => !o.ExistsInProfile).ToList();

     profileOrgs.ForEach(o =>
         {
             var duplicate = kvkOrgs.FirstOrDefault(k => k.KvK == o.KvK || k.Title == o.Title);
             if (duplicate != null)
             {
                  o.CompanyInfoOrganisation = duplicate.CompanyInfoOrganisation;
                  o.ExistsInBoth = true;
                  kvkOrgs.Remove(duplicate);
              }
           });

      _organisations = profileOrgs.Concat(kvkOrgs).OrderBy(o => o.Title).ToList();
}

In this example the property CompanyInfoOrganisation (simply a get; set; property) is copied when an organisation is considered a duplicate. This all works as expected, duplicates are nicely deduplicated.

Also this is true inside this message:
_organisations.First(o => o.ExistsInBoth).CompanyInfoOrganisation != null;

Problem

Now I bind the _organisations list to a listbox

lbxCompanies.DataSource = null;
lbxCompanies.DataSource = _organisations;
lbxCompanies.DisplayMember = "Title";
lbxCompanies.SelectedIndex = -1;

and later on get the selected value:

 var org = lbxCompanies.SelectedValue as Organisation;
 gbxCompanyInfo.Visible = org != null;
 if (gbxCompanyInfo.Visible)
    if (org.CompanyInfoOrganisation != null)
          // NEVER GETS HERE (but gbxComanpyInfo is visible)

If I try to read the CompanyInfoOrganisation property I always get null while I know the property was set.

Question

What is happening here? How come the property reference is destroyed? How can I prevent this from happening?

share|improve this question
    
Would you mind posting your binding? –  Tom Garske Jul 11 '12 at 11:46
    
Do you mean the binding to the listbox? I will add it in the question! –  Corné Hogerheijde Jul 11 '12 at 11:49
    
Since your talking listbox, that tends to imply some form of UI. What type of application is this - WinForms? WPF? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 11 '12 at 11:55
    
WinForms, but that should not matter since the objects can be used anywhere. The problem (as answered by @JoelEtherton) was the object getting out of scope. –  Corné Hogerheijde Jul 11 '12 at 12:00
    
What happens to ExistsInBoth? Is it true or false? –  AlexDev Jul 11 '12 at 13:22

4 Answers 4

The reference you're using only has immediate scope and as soon as the query ends it exits scope and your reference disappears. So when you bind later, the reference is exactly right -- null.

profileOrgs.ForEach(o =>
{
    // Right here -- var duplicate has scope ONLY within your query. 
    // As soon as the query is executed it leaves scope and the reference
    // pointer will be null
    var duplicate = kvkOrgs.FirstOrDefault(k => k.KvK == o.KvK || k.Title == o.Title);
    if (duplicate != null)
    {
        o.CompanyInfoOrganisation = duplicate.CompanyInfoOrganisation;
        o.ExistsInBoth = true;
        kvkOrgs.Remove(duplicate);
    }
});

Because you're using a class, you need to perform a deep MemberwiseClone on it to get a NEW copy of the object:

o.CompanyInfoOrganisation = (YourInfoType)duplicate.CompanyInfoOrganisation.MemberwiseClone();
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for your answer! I was afraid I'd have to do something like that. Somehow I expected the reference to remain existing outside the scope. I was wrong... –  Corné Hogerheijde Jul 11 '12 at 11:58
    
@CornéHogerheijde did this actually fix your issue? I don't understand how a reference doing out of scope would affect any other references to the same object. –  Eren Ersönmez Jul 11 '12 at 12:05
1  
@ErenErsönmez: In the manner being used in OPs question, the local variable duplicate is declared. When the assignment is made: o.CIO = duplicate.CIO there is no actual copying being done. The only assignment used is a pointer to the original object duplicate. When the query exits, duplicate becomes null, but the ADDRESS does not. So now the address, which sits inside the still in scope object o, will now point to null instead of a valid memory object. –  Joel Etherton Jul 11 '12 at 12:11
    
Thanks, but after o.CIO = duplicate.CIO , o.CIO has nothing to do with the variable duplicate. It doesn't matter if it becomes null or not. duplicate was only used for a member access and the "reference" resulting from that member access was writen to o.CIO. Now, you have two (or possibly more elsewhere) references to the same object. You set duplicate to null, or duplicate.CIO to null, it won't affect the actual CIO object they are referencing, so the o.CIO would not be affected. –  Eren Ersönmez Jul 11 '12 at 12:30
    
Consider this: var a = new MyClass(); a.Val = (object)1; var b = a.Val; a = null; ... b would remain non-null. –  Eren Ersönmez Jul 11 '12 at 12:34

When you load the data, load the CompanyInfoOrganisation property along with the root entity; that way it will be already loaded into memory. If using LINQ to SQL, you load via DataLoadOptions, and pass this to the context. If using Entity Framework, you use the Include method in the LINQ query.

share|improve this answer

It might have to do with capturing of variables inside the lambda. Try substituting the .ForEach to a regular foreach(). Or maybe the CompanyInfoOrganisation in duplicate was null to begin with.

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

The problem was I used string.Join() to show the values, and the first value to join was null (which is really annoying), resulting in an empty string, leaving me thinking the property was null. However it turned out the property was not null, but has a perfectly valid reference to the object needed. Using the debugger with a little more care would have saved me an hour or so...

Sorry!

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.