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I'm new here and this is my first question. I'm making a game in Python 3.2.3 and I've come to a problem where a Timer object sometimes crashes the interpreter after calling it's start() method (it happens like 50% of the times, there is always an error window saying that Python stopped working and had to be terminated).

I've been simplifying my code so I could locate the issue and I've discovered that this very simple code crashes my interpreter:

from threading import Timer

def hello():
  print("hello, world")

t = Timer(1.0, hello)
t.start()

I've tried repairing my Python instalation, which didn't work. I'm running Python under Windows 7 and unfortunatelly haven't had a chance to try another operating system so far, so if anyone has any experience with this issue, I would appreciate any solutions to this. Thanks everyone.

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No error here, using python 3.2.3 on Windows 7 –  Jakob Bowyer Jul 11 '12 at 12:22
    
This simplified version crashes 100% of the time? Under Windows 7 I couldn't get this to crash for me with v 2.7.2 or 3.2.3. Also ok under Linux (in VirtualBox VM) with v 2.6.5 –  Levon Jul 11 '12 at 12:23
    
Works for me on OSX 10.7.4 python 2.7.3 –  GP89 Jul 11 '12 at 12:43
    
@Levon The simplified code crashes approximately 50% of the time, not 100%. Thank you for the feedback, I can see that this is probably not a bad Python code problem but more likely there is something wrong with my system, will try to reinstall everything and see if it works. –  Miloslav Číž Jul 11 '12 at 14:17

3 Answers 3

I reconstructed your problem, your code works just fine for me. You may want to consider using the Time library?

from time import sleep
def hello():
   print('hello world')
sleep(1)
hello()

This might be a safer solution for you, but I recommend you updating your OS and reinstalling python. Tried with python2.7?

share|improve this answer
    
Sleep blocks dude.... –  Jakob Bowyer Jul 11 '12 at 12:28
    
I haven't tried Python 2.7 yet but I'm going to do it as soon as possible, will let you know about the results. I can't use sleep as I need it to be multithread, the game must be running while the timer's waiting and triggering things. –  Miloslav Číž Jul 11 '12 at 14:04

You should not leave behind threads or timers behind after the script finishes. However, I am not even sure that the following, that does not suffer that problem, would work on your system reliably:

# This is NOT the suggested fix

from threading import Timer

def hello():
  print("hello, world")

t = Timer(1.0, hello)
t.start()
sleep(2)    

The reason why the other people trying to reproduce do not suffer problems is that they run the script as a standalone process, and the timer is unregistered by the operating system when that process exits, whereas you are supposedly working in the interactive mode.

The real solution is to stop using interactive mode for working with timers and threads.

More background here.

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I've tried this code and it still crashes, I have also tried deleting the Timer object at the end of the script, still not working. I'm running the script via command line as a new process, not in interactive mode. Guess I'll just have to reinstall everything and see if it works. –  Miloslav Číž Jul 11 '12 at 14:12
    
@MiloslavČíž - I'm sorry to hear that - yes, and if it doesn't, please tag the question with your operating system and indicate the exact versions of Python and OS involved, as well as the exact symptoms of the crash (like the error message). –  Jirka Hanika Jul 11 '12 at 14:20

So the problem is solved, reinstalling Python helped. Repair installation, however, did not, which might be good thing to know. Thanks for your help.

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