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This is my DAL, I'm about to try/catch the code and since the concept is not that grown in me I have the following doubt. The one time when it actually does something is in ExecuteSQL method. So, there I'll have one try/catch. But in GetLinea or UpdateLinea should I also add? I can only think of quite weird errors there.

Also, If you have any suggestions for a cleanup in this code I'd love to hear about it. Thanks.

namespace DAL
{
    public class Connection
    {
        public string GetNewConnection(string server)
        {
            return ConfigurationManager.ConnectionStrings[server].ConnectionString;
        }

        public DataSet ExecuteSQL(string sp)
        {
            DataSet ds = new DataSet();
            string connectionString = GetNewConnection("BO");
            SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connectionString);
            SqlCommand command = new SqlCommand(sp, conn);
            command.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            SqlDataAdapter da = new SqlDataAdapter(command);
            using (conn)
            {
                da.Fill(ds);
            }
            return ds;
        }
    }
    public class LineaDAL
    {
        Connection obj = new Connection();
        public DataSet GetLinea()
        {
            DataSet ds = new DataSet();
            string sp;
            sp = "sp1";
            ds = obj.ExecuteSQL(sp);
            return ds;
        }

        public bool UpdateLinea(string reclamo)
        {
            DataSet ds = new DataSet();
            string sp;
            sp = "sp2";
            ds = obj.ExecuteSQL(sp);
            return ExtensionMethods.IsEmpty(ds);
        }
    }

    public static class ExtensionMethods
    {
        public static bool IsEmpty(this DataSet ds)
        {
            return ds == null ||
              !(from DataTable t in ds.Tables where t.Rows.Count > 0 select t).Any();
        }
    }

}
share|improve this question
2  
As DataSet, SqlCommand and SqlDataAdapter are all disposable, you should add a using block for them, too. That'll handle a lot of cleanup for you. –  Gene Jul 11 '12 at 12:29
    
never thought of it, thanks Gene. –  Daniel Sh. Jul 11 '12 at 12:34

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

As with any exception handling, it really depends on what you are going to do with it. Too often try/catch is used as a way to catch possible bugs just in case. But, really you should have very little try/catch unless you are looking to catch something specific and deal with it properly (notify the user with a custom message for that error). If you do not have anything meaningful to do with the catch, then let it bubble to a top level exception handler. That is my 2 cents at least

Here is a much more in depth article on exception handling

share|improve this answer
    
the exceptions will be for admin purposes. Besides a general message sent to the user, all I want to achieve is getting myself an instant information of what went wrong, why the exception happened. Once the system is running it's crucial it's on 24/7. So I want to keep it updated as much as I can so the exceptions keep going down and down. –  Daniel Sh. Jul 11 '12 at 12:36
    
Considering my purpose, should I use and abuse the try/catcheS? –  Daniel Sh. Jul 11 '12 at 12:55
    
From the linked article: ...if you caught a generic Exception, log it somewhere. But log it only once - often code is ridden with catch blocks that log exceptions..., with too much repeated information to be useful... I take from that to let the generic exceptions bubble to a top exception handler (root method that will avoid a crash), however I do not see a huge problem with try/catching each and every one for logging purposes...but that might get tedious as they would all be the same construct and break DRY a little...at minimum do not rethrow and have the calling method log also –  Justin Pihony Jul 11 '12 at 13:00
    
yes, I get your point, thanks a lot for the insights. –  Daniel Sh. Jul 11 '12 at 13:03

Have a look at this article for general advice on handling exceptions: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/seyhszts.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Good one, thanks a lot. –  Daniel Sh. Jul 11 '12 at 12:33

With database access, it's always a good idea to try/catch/finally :

try to perform your database operation (select, insert, update, delete, or whaetever)

catch any errors (database connection lost, invalid sql, ... you can never know)

finally clean up everything (discard connection if necessary, ...)

It's not because you can only think up "weird errors" that everything will always go right. And it is your application's responsibility to handle errors, and inform the user of what went wrong (ie. tell the user to check his network connection).

Hope that helps :)

share|improve this answer
    
thanks a lot Fabre. –  Daniel Sh. Jul 11 '12 at 12:38

Well, GetLinea and UpdateLinea considering thet execute SQL query can fail.

But either catch an exception from them or not, it's something that you has to decide, based on the answer to the question: is the exception occured inside that methods fatal error? If yes, do not handle it with try/catch and let it fail your program (Fatal Error). Otherwise insert them too inside try/catch

to cleanup something use finally block

try {
...
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
  ...
}
finally {

 .. cleanup...
}

which is guaranteed to be executed (in most circumstances) either there is exception or not.

share|improve this answer

It would be a good idea to log the errors.

Something like:

try
{
...
}
catch(Exception ex)
{
    Log(ex.Message);
    MessageBox.Show("Error Occured. Please try again later."); //General message to the user 
}
finally
{
    Cleanup... like Disposing objects (like com objects) if they need to be disposed.
}

You can use something like Log4Net for loggin purpose, but can build up your own logger as well.

It's a good practice to use try/catch if you are think that the piece of code could result in a bug, even though you are sure that you have handled the conditions that might cause them. In your case, why not use, just to be sure that if an exception occurs, it is handled.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes. I was thinking in building an exception method to be called in the "catch" everytime. Just a method to fill a table so I can get them everyday at the office. –  Daniel Sh. Jul 11 '12 at 13:00

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