Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

In fork system call in arm,

swi #0

instruction is used, what exactly it does?

Thank you.

share|improve this question
    
Did you thought about using google? – DipSwitch Jul 11 '12 at 12:42

If you google on 'swi arm instruction' the first hit for example is:...

SWI : SoftWare Interrupt

SWI This is a simple facility, but possibly the most used. Many Operating System facilities are provided by SWIs. It is impossible to imagine RISC OS without SWIs. Nava Whiteford explains how SWIs work (originally in Frobnicate issue 12½)...

In this article I will attempt to delve into the working of SWIs (SoftWare Interrupts). What is a SWI?

SWI stands for Software Interrupt. In RISC OS SWIs are used to access Operating System routines or modules produced by a 3rd party. Many applications use modules to provide low level external access for other applications. Examples of SWIs are:

The Filer SWIs, which aid reading to and from disc, setting attributes etc. The Printer Driver SWIs, used to well aid the use of the Parallel port for printing. The SWIs FreeNet/Acorn TCP/IP stack SWIs used to transmit and receive data using the TCP/IP protocol usually used for sending data over the Internet. When used in this way, SWIs allow the Operating System to have a modular structure, meaning that the code required to create a complete operating system can be split up into a number of small parts (modules) and a module handler.

When the SWI handler gets a request for a particular routine number it finds the position of the routine and executes it, passing any data.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you for answering. the meaning of swi is known. I want to know the internals, for system calls like __fork, from bionic (in android) the swi is being called. Then how exactly it enters kernel, how kernel services that system call? – LKL Jul 13 '12 at 5:45

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.