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i am making some experiments with sockets in C but i have a problem that i think there is a solution but i can't figure it out!

i have a server and a client written in C and they works so good in local network, i tried 'localhost' and 127.0.0.1 or just 192.168.1.2 and everything works like a charm... but when i try to connect to a remote host (for my experiments i used my own computer with IP found on http://www.whatismyip.com/ 62.98.XXX.XX) connection and data (string) exchange never happens...

how can i solve this issue?

here is my server.c code

    //server

#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <time.h> 

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int listenfd = 0, connfd = 0;
    struct sockaddr_in serv_addr; 

    char sendBuff[1025];
    time_t ticks; 

    listenfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0);
    memset(&serv_addr, '0', sizeof(serv_addr));
    memset(sendBuff, '0', sizeof(sendBuff)); 

    serv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
    serv_addr.sin_addr.s_addr = htonl(INADDR_ANY);
    serv_addr.sin_port = htons(5000); 

    bind(listenfd, (struct sockaddr*)&serv_addr, sizeof(serv_addr)); 

    listen(listenfd, 10); 

    while(1)
    {
        connfd = accept(listenfd, (struct sockaddr*)NULL, NULL); 

        ticks = time(NULL);
        snprintf(sendBuff, sizeof(sendBuff), "%.24s\r\n", ctime(&ticks));
        write(connfd, sendBuff, strlen(sendBuff)); 

        close(connfd);
        sleep(1);
     }
}

and this is my client.c code

//client

#include <sys/socket.h>
#include <sys/types.h>
#include <netinet/in.h>
#include <netdb.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <arpa/inet.h> 

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    int sockfd = 0, n = 0;
    char recvBuff[1024];
    struct sockaddr_in serv_addr; 

    if(argc != 2)
    {
        printf("\n Usage: %s <ip of server> \n",argv[0]);
        return 1;
    } 

    memset(recvBuff, '0',sizeof(recvBuff));
    if((sockfd = socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, 0)) < 0)
    {
        printf("\n Error : Could not create socket \n");
        return 1;
    } 

    memset(&serv_addr, '0', sizeof(serv_addr)); 

    serv_addr.sin_family = AF_INET;
    serv_addr.sin_port = htons(5000); 

    if(inet_pton(AF_INET, argv[1], &serv_addr.sin_addr)<=0)
    {
        printf("\n inet_pton error occured\n");
        return 1;
    } 

    if( connect(sockfd, (struct sockaddr *)&serv_addr, sizeof(serv_addr)) < 0)
    {
       printf("\n Error : Connect Failed \n");
       return 1;
    } 

    while ( (n = read(sockfd, recvBuff, sizeof(recvBuff)-1)) > 0)
    {
        recvBuff[n] = 0;
        if(fputs(recvBuff, stdout) == EOF)
        {
            printf("\n Error : Fputs error\n");
        }
    } 

    if(n < 0)
    {
        printf("\n Read error \n");
    } 

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
1  
Maybe port 5000 is blocked by your firewall/natbox? –  wildplasser Jul 11 '12 at 13:33
1  
Try running the server and use telnet to that port. This will check out your connectivity. –  Ed Heal Jul 11 '12 at 13:35
1  
Right, this is almost certainly a network configuration issue, with the port being blocked by a router or other equipment on your network. –  Justin Ethier Jul 11 '12 at 13:47
1  
In addition if you are behind a normal cable/dsl router you will need to "port forward" the appropriate port to your PC. Check your routers config screen - note that this lets anyone in the world access that port! –  Martin Beckett Jul 11 '12 at 14:12
    
mmh...do you think it's a port issue? what number can i try that it's surely open? if i try it over 3G it will work? thanks... –  Fabiosoft Jul 11 '12 at 15:31

2 Answers 2

At least one problem with this code:

memset(&serv_addr, '0', sizeof(serv_addr));

Do you really want to fill memory with 0x30?

share|improve this answer

As some peopl in the comments already said, probably your router or whatever serves you to cross the boundary between 192.168.* and 62.98.XXX.XX blocks that access. The reason is clear - it doesn't know which of the PCs behind it is supposed to be conencted, if any.

You have to explicitly tell the box (I assume you have full access to it) to which internal IP to forward. If you don't have full access, you won't be able to do this, as there are no ports which are surely open.

Over 3G, it probably won't work, as most mobile providers give out IPv4 addresses in the range 10.0.0.0/8.

Alternatively, as we have 2012 meanwhile, you could set up a IPv6 environment and modify your program to be capable of it.

share|improve this answer
    
i don't want change settings in my router because this is just an experiment... my entire project will be moved to iPhone so i can't control to want kind of router it will be used. I need to exchange a lot of strings (objects moving coordinates) so i thought about sockets.... can you suggest me some alternatives? –  Fabiosoft Jul 13 '12 at 15:50
    
@Fabiosoft You could set up a central server where the phone connects to an handles its communication stuff. –  glglgl Jul 14 '12 at 13:27
    
i thought about a central server with mysql but i have to exchange a lot of coordinates (numbers) so i don't know it could be fast... some other ideas? –  Fabiosoft Jul 16 '12 at 12:45

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