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I know there are quite some topics that seem to be about the exact same thing, but I didn't find one that really was about what I wanted.

So I was curious and wanted to compare the performance of Fast Enumeration to NSEnumerator and a for loop. (This is the part that is asked quite frequently)

First I compared Fast Enumeration:

for(NSNumber *number in testArray)
{
    assert(number);
}

NSEnumerator:

NSEnumerator *enumerator = [testArray objectEnumerator];
NSNumber *number;
while (number = [enumerator nextObject]) 
{
    assert(number);
}

for Loop:

for(NSUInteger i = 0; i < [testArray count]; i++)
{
    NSNumber *number = [testArray objectAtIndex:i];
    assert(number);
}

My testArray was an Array consisting of NSNumbers from 0 to 1,000,000 and I ran the tests 100 Times after each other and calculated the mean run time for each test.

Also I ran them on my iPad 2

Results: (mean time of all 100 runs)

  • 0.042687s Fast Enumeration
  • 0.582072s NSEnumerator
  • 0.627318s for-loop

As expected, Fast Enumeration is by far the fastest, and NSEnumerator is still a little bit faster than the for-loop, but this was for enumerating quit a large Array

So here's the not so frequent Question:

Actually I was interested in something else: Enumeration in an array to compare each object with each other in the array

First attempt with a nested for-loop:

for(int i = 0; i < [testArray count]-1; i++)
{
    NSNumber *number = [testArray objectAtIndex:i];
    for(int j = i+1; j < [testArray count]; j++)
    {
        NSNumber *innerLoopNumber = [testArray objectAtIndex:j];
        assert(innerLoopNumber);
        assert(number);
    }
}

For these Tests I had to reduce the size of the array and the number of runs to get them done in a reasonable time, because number of iterations grows of course with O(n^2). So I ran them with an array with 5.000 NSNumbers and repeated the tests 5 times.

Result: 7.360645s for 1 run

So I thought, sure, fast Enumeration should be faster. But to achieve the triangular Pattern to avoid comparing each pair of elements two times, I had to mix Fast Enumeration in the outer loop with NSEnumerator in the inner loop

for(NSNumber *number in testArray)
{
    NSEnumerator *reverseEnumterator = [testArray reverseObjectEnumerator];
    NSNumber *innerLoopNumber = reverseEnumterator.nextObject;
    while(innerLoopNumber && ![innerLoopNumber isEqualToNumber:number])
    {
        innerLoopNumber = reverseEnumterator.nextObject;
        assert(innerLoopNumber);
        assert(number);
    }
}

And to my surprise, this was much slower: 18.086980s for 1 run

I then tried a hybrid version as well, using Fast Enumeration for the outer loop and a for-loop for the inner one:

int counter = 0;
for(NSNumber *number in testArray)
{
    for(int j = counter +1; j < [testArray count]; j++)
    {
        NSNumber *innerLoopNumber = [testArray objectAtIndex:j];
        assert(innerLoopNumber);
        assert(number);
    }
    counter++;
}

Result: 7.079600s for 1 Run

Just slightly faster than the plain for-loop.

the numbers in one place:

  • 07.360645s for-Loop
  • 07.079600s Hybrid
  • 18.086980s Fast Enumeration

So I wonder, why is that? Does Fast Enumeration only work well when it is "undisrupted", does the use of NSEnumerator interfere with Fast Enumeration? Or am I just missing something and my Method is wrong?

share|improve this question
    
Note that you are redundantly calling a method, [testArray count], in each iteration of the for loop. –  echristopherson Jul 11 '12 at 21:03
    
According to Apple's document, when using for-loop: "in each loop iteration, it dispatches a message to get the number of items in the array, which is wasteful. If the number of items in the array never changes, you could assign that value to a variable and use that instead" –  user523234 Nov 27 '13 at 14:44
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1 Answer

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You're calling additional methods in your fast enumeration loop. Objective-c has non-trivial method call overhead, so your problem is in the setup of the nested loops. As you can see fast enumeration + for loop is faster than for loop + for loop, and here you're avoiding additional method calls.

share|improve this answer
    
Hm i see your point. The equality check is not necessary in the other constructions. But the check is what makes the difference between n^2 iterations ans (n^2)/2 iterations. So it would depend on the cost of the actual operation in the loop, but it seems to me that for such a case, a nested fast enumeration construction is simply unsuited. –  MeXx Jul 11 '12 at 14:07
    
Try not doing the equality check, I'll bet fast enumeration would be faster doing twice as many checks without the additional call overhead than the other types doing half the checks. –  Dustin Jul 11 '12 at 14:10
    
I tried that: 15.004834s, a little bit faster than with the comparisons, but still almost double the time of the other solutions. And if i put real work in the inner loop, not just the asserts, the fact that it goes through the inner loop twice as often just becomes more expensive. I've found something more interesting though: Creating a subarrayWithRange in the outerLoop and then fast-enumerating through this achieves the same thing but is way faster than everything else so far with 2.626523s, more than twice as fast as the for loop and really double fast-enumeration –  MeXx Jul 11 '12 at 14:45
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