Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I would like to know how to remove all the HTML between two strings in a webpage. The webpage will not always have the same content, so this must work no matter what the two strings are and what their positions are. For example,

<div class='foo'>
   <div class='userid'>123</div>
   <div class='content'>
      asdfasdf
   </div>
</div>
<div class=bar>
   <div class='userid'>456</div>
   <div class='content'>
      qwerqwer
   </div>
</div>

How could I remove all the HTML between 'asdfasdf' and '123'?

Thanks

share|improve this question
2  
Using Javascript? That isn't going to be completely easy. What exactly do you want to do, can you elaborate? –  Pekka 웃 Jul 11 '12 at 14:08
    
"no matter what the two strings are and what their positions are" - how do you identify what and where they are then? And what do you want to end up with? –  jfrej Jul 11 '12 at 14:10
    
Do you mean remove anything that is within the 'content' divs? –  Billy Moat Jul 11 '12 at 14:11
1  
Does not make sense to me. I'm sure there is a much better solution to your problem than doing this, whatever the problem might be. What are you trying to solve here? –  kapa Jul 11 '12 at 14:15
    
Is it ok to hide something? Or do you really want to delete it? –  Sllix Jul 11 '12 at 14:15
show 5 more comments

1 Answer

up vote -1 down vote accepted

This is ugly but it works:

​var container = $("#cont");
var text = container.html();
var arr = text.split("asdfasdf");
arr[1] = "";
arr = arr.join("");
$("#cont").html(arr);

I added a container div. You could use the body tag or something else. Its possible with a regex as well.

Here is a working demo http://jsfiddle.net/QJSJH/.

Edit

I see the post changed quite a bit, but you could use the same concept as above.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.