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Suppose I want to create a functor that acts upon some general type. For example

template<typename Ape>
class functor1
{
   void operator()(Ape& m)
   {
      // Do something to m
   }
};

This has been the standard way of doing things for me. However, I also have another way:

class functor2
{
   template<typename Ape>
   void operator()(Ape& m)
   {
      // Do something to m
   }
};

The advantage of the second approach is that I don't have to explicitly state the type of the template.

int main()
{
   std::vector<chimpanzee> chimps(100);
   for_each(chimps.begin(), chimps.end(), functor1<chimpanzee>()); // Explicity state the type
   for_each(chimps.begin(), chimps.end(), functor2()); // Less typing. Will it work?
}

Will the second version work? Or am I missing something? If it works are there any advantages to the first approach?

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1  
Did you try this? –  Alex Farber Jul 11 '12 at 14:21

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The obvious difference is that in the first case you specify the type explicitly, and in the second case it is the compiler that will deduce the type for you in the context of the actual call. However, in you specific example it might make no real difference at all.

  1. If your class had multiple member functions in it, the first variant would "fix" the same template parameter for all of them, while in the second variant the parameter would be deduced for each member function independently.

    The same is true when a single member function is called from multiple contexts: each context will perform its own template argument deduction in the second variant.

    It could be good or not so good, depending on your intent.

  2. If your function accepted its argument by value (or by const reference), in the first variant you could specify a different type for the argument than the one stored in the container. For example, you could have created a functor for long and applied it to the container of ints. This is not possible in the second variant.

    For example, if your chimpanzee class was polymorphic, derived from animal, you could have used a functor1<animal> to iterate over such container. In the second variant the template parameter will be deduced for you as chimpanzee, not as animal.

  3. If your class had data members, the second variant would make sure that all specializations of member function(s) share the same data, if the same functor object is used. In the first variant each specialization is a different class, it gets its own data.

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Not sure about that last part. Specializations would only share the same data if said data were either declared static or if the same object were used in all cases. If different functor objects are used, and members were not static, then there's no shared data. –  Mike DeSimone Jul 11 '12 at 14:31
1  
@Mike DeSimone: I'm referring to all specializations of template member functions called on the same non-template object. Of course, they will share data. It is just difficult to express clearly... –  AndreyT Jul 11 '12 at 14:36
    
Thank you for your very detailed answer. –  Iam Jul 11 '12 at 16:16

For functors with no state this should be the same. Frequently (compares) you need to store another object/ref/pointer of the same type in the functor and your second option wouldn't work in that case. Note that if your functor does need constructor parameters you can make a free function make_<foo> like make_pair to deduce the type for you and again reduce typing.

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Could you please give me an example for make_<foo>? I didn't quite understood how I might use such a function. –  Iam Jul 11 '12 at 16:14

It's like scoping: in functor1, anything in the class can use the type Ape (for member declarations, parameter and return types types, traits, or whatever), while in functor2, Ape only means something within the scope of operator(). In short:

  • Time of definition:
    • functor1 needs to know about Ape when it is created.
    • functor2 doesn't need to know about Ape until it is called.
  • Scope of type:
    • Everything in functor1 knows about Ape.
    • Only operator() in functor2 knows about Ape.
  • Versatility of an instance:
    • A functor1 instance only works with a single type of Ape.
    • A functor2 instance works with any type of Ape.
share|improve this answer
    
I don't know if functor1 "is an" Ape :), but I understand what your mean. Thank you for your answer. –  Iam Jul 11 '12 at 16:17
    
You're right, that is a bit off. It would be true if you declared it as template<typename Ape> class functor1: public Ape { ... }; I'll clarify my answer. –  Mike DeSimone Jul 11 '12 at 22:29

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