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How can I get an IEnumerable of random values? I'm disappointed the class Random doesn't implement IEnumerable<int>.

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1  
What have you tried? Is it that hard for you to write one yourself? –  Servy Jul 11 '12 at 14:49
    
Would randomly generating a bunch of numbers and store them in a list, which implements IEnumerable<T>, fulfill your requirement? –  Brian Mains Jul 11 '12 at 14:50
1  
And I'm disappointed it doesn't implement IEnumerable<double>...oh now I see why they didn't implement either. –  user7116 Jul 11 '12 at 14:53

3 Answers 3

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Write an extension method that will yield return new values.

public static IEnumerable<int> GetRandomValues(this Random instance)
{
    while(true)
    {
        yield return instance.Next();
    }
}
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2  
+1 like the idea of an extension to Random –  D Stanley Jul 11 '12 at 14:53
    
Thanks. If I made a GetEnumerator extension method, will I now be able to foreach over an object of type Random? –  Colonel Panic Jul 11 '12 at 15:00
    
+1 This is a much better API than my hastily-written answer. –  Bryan Watts Jul 11 '12 at 15:01
    
Does this mean if you do something like: var myRandom = new Random(); foreach(int r in myRandom.GetRandomValues()){} it will loop indefinitely? –  Chris Sinclair Jul 11 '12 at 15:07
    
@ChrisSinclair - yes. The method gives you an infinite collection of values, you have to decide when to stop reading. –  Jakub Konecki Jul 11 '12 at 15:08

You can implement this yourself fairly easily, for example

public IEnumerable<int> RandomInts(int below)
{
    Random r = new Random();
    while (true) yield return r.Next(below);
}
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+1 nice and simple! –  n8wrl Jul 11 '12 at 14:52
2  
I'd pass in the instance of Random to avoid seeding problems. –  CodesInChaos Jul 11 '12 at 14:55
    
@Code Yeah, that's a good idea... But then my answer would be pretty much the same as Jakub's :p –  Rawling Jul 11 '12 at 15:13

The some problematic points off having an IEnumerable<int> instance for the Random class are

  • The random generator has infinitely many elements, therefore using the foreach construct or an loop over the elements will never terminate.
  • The IEnumerator<int> instance which getEnumerator from IEnumerable<int> should return has a function Reset which resets the enumerator to the begin of the collection. Assuming correct behaviour this should return the first generated random number, as it was generated in the past.

The last problem can be solved in at least two ways,

  • Keeping an list of already generated values, this might not be very memory efficient, but at least ensures that it will always return the same values after resetting.
  • Keeping the starting seed and when Reset is called a new generator can be instantiated with the previous seed. All other random generating methods of Random should be hidden to prevent the, from being accessed.

As the bookkeeping method is not very good, I would go for the second version. Which is quite a large class, as you can see below.

public class RandomInt : IEnumerable<int>
{
    int seed;

    public RandomInt ()
    {
        seed = new Random ().Next();
    }


    public IEnumerator<int> GetEnumerator ()
    {
        return new InternalEnumerator (seed);
    }

    protected class InternalEnumerator : IEnumerator<int>
    {
        Random randomGen;
        int current;
        int seed;

        protected InternalEnumerator (int seed)
        {
            this.seed = seed;
        }

        #region IEnumerator implementation
        public bool MoveNext ()
        {
            if (randomGen == null)
                randomGen = new Random (seed);
            current = randomGen.Next();
            return true;
        }

        public void Reset ()
        {
            randomGen = null;
        }

        public int Current {
            get {
                if (randomGen == null)
                    throw new InvalidOperationException ("Enumerator in reset state");
                return current;
            }
        }
        #endregion
    }
}
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