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I have a GiftCouponPayment class. It has a business strategy logic which can change frequently - GetCouponValue(). At present the logic is “The coupon value should be considered as zero when the Coupon Number is less than 2000”. In a future business strategy it may change as “The coupon value should be considered as zero when the Coupon Issued Date is less than 1/1/2000”. It can change to any such strategies based on the managing department of the company.

How can we refactor the GiftCouponPayment class using Strategy pattern so that the class need not be changed when the strategy for GetCouponValue method?

UPDATE: After analyzing the responsibilities, I feel, "GiftCoupon" will be a better name for "GiftCouponPayment" class.

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C# CODE

    public int GetCouponValue()
    {
        int effectiveValue = -1;
        if (CouponNumber < 2000)
        {
            effectiveValue = 0;
        }
        else
        {
            effectiveValue = CouponValue;
        }

        return effectiveValue;
    }

READING

  1. Strategy Pattern - multiple return types/values
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4 Answers 4

GiftCouponPayment class should pass GiftCoupon to different strategy classes. So your strategy interface (CouponValueStrategy) should contain a method:

int getCouponValue(GiftCoupon giftCoupon)

Since each Concrete strategy implementing CouponValueStrategy has access to GiftCoupon, each can implement an algorithm based on Coupon number or Coupon date etc.

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Are you saying "getCouponValue" should be part of Strategy class's responsibility? Only the strategy determination should be responsibility of this class, isn't it? Can you please elaborate the code? –  Lijo Jul 11 '12 at 15:29
    
Not sure I understand but GiftCouponPayment should know which strategy to choose and getCouponValue method in 1 Strategy class will have code which checks if couponNumber < 2000 and in another Strategy class, the code will be if couponDate < #someDate# –  user1168577 Jul 11 '12 at 15:36

You can inject a "coupon value policy" into the coupon object itself and call upon it to compute the coupon value. In such cases, it is acceptable to pass this into the policy so that the policy can ask the coupon for its required attributes (such as coupon number):

public interface ICouponValuePolicy
{
  int ComputeCouponValue(GiftCouponPayment couponPayment);
}

public class GiftCouponPayment
{
  public ICouponValuePolicy CouponValuePolicy {
    get;
    set;
  }

  public int GetCouponValue()
  {
    return CouponValuePolicy.ComputeCouponValue(this);
  }
}

Also, it seems like your GiftCouponPayment is really responsible for two things (the payment and the gift coupon). It might make sense to extract a GiftCoupon class that contains CouponNumber, CouponValue and GetCouponValue(), and refer to this from the GiftCouponPayment.

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Do you suggest to make GiftCoupon a value object in DDD? –  Lijo Jul 11 '12 at 15:25
1  
I do not think GiftCoupon should be a value object, since - as far as i understand your domain-, a GiftCoupon is identifiable, and it's identity is not defined by the value of its properties. A payment however, should be a value type. –  Frederik Gheysels Jul 11 '12 at 15:31
    
@FrederikGheysels Thanks. Do you mean "GiftCouponPayment" should be a value object? Is it advisable for a value object (GiftCouponPayment) to hold a non-value object (GiftCoupon) ? –  Lijo Jul 11 '12 at 15:35
1  
@Lijo: Payment is definitely an entity since it is tracked by a unique ID. The gift coupon could be either an entity (if the coupon number is unique) or a value object. –  casablanca Jul 11 '12 at 15:36
1  
@Lijo: It still seems like the payment and the gift coupon are two different things. The gift coupon exists even before it is used to pay for something. –  casablanca Jul 11 '12 at 16:59

When your business - logic changes, it's quite natural that your code will have to change as well.

You could perhaps opt to move the expiration-detection logic into a specification class:

    public class CouponIsExpiredBasedOnNumber : ICouponIsExpiredSpecification
    {

        public bool IsExpired( Coupon c )
        {
             if( c.CouponNumber < 2000 )
                 return true;
             else
                  return false;
        }
    }

    public class CouponIsExpiredBasedOnDate : ICouponIsExpiredSpecification
    {
       public readonly DateTime expirationDate = new DateTime (2000, 1, 1);

       public bool IsExpired( Coupon c )
        {
             if( c.Date < expirationDate )
                 return true;
             else
                  return false;
        }
    }

public class Coupon
{
     public int GetCouponValue()
     {
        ICouponIsExpiredSpecification expirationRule = GetExpirationRule();

        if( expirationRule.IsExpired(this) ) 
           return 0;
        else
           return this.Value;

     }
}

The question you should ask yourself: is it necessary to make it this complex right now ? Can't you make it as simple as possible to satisfy current needs, and refactor it later, when the expiration-rule indeed changes ?

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Thanks. What is the best place to write GetExpirationRule() ? –  Lijo Jul 11 '12 at 15:22
    
That depends; it could be in a seperate factory class. –  Frederik Gheysels Jul 11 '12 at 15:30
    
Do you think it is a "Provider" pattern or Strategy Pattern? –  Lijo Jul 11 '12 at 16:12

The behavior that you wish to be dynamic is the coupon calculation - which can dependent on any number of things: coupon date, coupon number, etc. I think that a provider pattern would be more appropriate, to inject a service class which calculates the coupon value.

The essence of this is moving the business logic outside of the GiftCouponPayment class, and using a class I'll call "CouponCalculator" to encapsulate the business logic. This class uses an interface.

interface ICouponCalculator
{
    int Calculate (GiftCouponPayment payment);
}

public class CouponCalculator : ICouponCalculator
{
   public int Calculate (GiftCouponPayment payment)
   {
      if (payment.CouponNumber < 2000)
      {
         return 0;
      }
      else
      {
         return payment.CouponValue;
      }
   }
}

Now that you have this interface and class, add a property to the GiftCouponPayment class, then modify your original GetCouponValue() method:

public class GiftCouponPayment
{
   public int CouponNumber;
   public int CouponValue;

   public ICouponCalculator Calculator { get; set; }

   public int GetCouponValue()
   {
      return Calculator.Calculate(this);
   }
}

When you construct the GiftCouponPayment class, you will assign the Calculator property:

var payment = new GiftCouponPayment() { Calculator = new CouponCalculator(); }
var val = payment.GetCouponValue(); // uses CouponCalculator class to get value

If this seems like a lot of work just to move the calculation logic outside of the GiftCouponPayment class, well, it is! But if this is your requirement, it does provide several things:

1. You won't need to change the GiftCouponPayment class to adjust the calculation logic.

2. You could create additional classes that implement ICalculator, and a factory pattern to decide which class to inject into GiftCouponPayment when it is constructed. This speaks more to your original desire for a "strategy" pattern - as this would be useful if the logic becomes very complex.

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Thanks. Is your example a "provider pattern"? What makes it provider? Do you see any other answers here as strategy pattern way? –  Lijo Jul 11 '12 at 15:38
1  
It is a "provider" since the calculation logic is separated from the GiftCouponPayment class, and the GiftCouponPayment class does not "know" how the coupon is calculated - the coupon calculator class is provided to the GiftCouponPayment class as a service provider which exists to calculate coupons. –  moomi Jul 11 '12 at 15:51
1  
Also, a true strategy pattern is not addressed here. A strategy pattern would be the logic to decide which calculator to use based on other criteria (date, coupon number, etc.). –  moomi Jul 11 '12 at 15:55
    
Can you please update the answer with the following - How will the strategy class will look like "to decide which calculator". How that will be different from a factory? –  Lijo Jul 11 '12 at 16:13
    
a factory pattern is usually a static method, which in this case would return to you a class object that implements ICouponCalculator, based on the other criteria (date, count of payments, etc.). The strategy pattern could be said to be the logic within that factory method implementation. In essence, the "strategy" is the case statement, if/else statement, etc. that decides which ICouponCalculator class to return; the "strategy" is not necessarily a class by itself. –  moomi Jul 12 '12 at 13:06

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