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I created a small program that reads a text file and creates an output based on this textfile.

An Example of the text file could be this:

f
a b c
d e

What my program will then do is create a new text file that displays the line and then all the combinations/permutations of the words in each line, something like this:

f
a b c 
a c b
b a c
b c a
c b a
c a b
a b
a c
b a
b c
c a
c b
a
b
c
d e
e d
e
d

I currently have this function working properly, however, I decided I want to create a secondary text file that outputs the same thing except with " ~ " infront of the combinations/permutations of each entry to increase readability.

Currently, what I have this two outputstrings, so lets say:

string outputStringNormal = "";
string outputStringReadable = "";

Then in my code I basically add the text to each output string:

outputStringNormal += someText;
outputStringReadable += " ~ " + someText;

I was wondering if it would be more efficient if I were to just have one output string and I append [randomMarker] to the beginning of each combination/permutation, and right before I output the new text files, in the normal file, I will string replace my marker with "", and then in my Readable I will replace it with " ~ ".

So like this:

outputString += "[randomMarker]" + someText;

And then right before output:

CreateSomeFile(outputString.Replace("[randomMarker]", "");
CreateSomeFile(outputString.Replace("[randomMarker]", " ~ ");
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I don't think this is a C question. :P –  airza Jul 11 '12 at 15:01
1  
..or C++ question. –  Jack Jul 11 '12 at 15:02
    
Sorry, i was just thinking that this was a pretty general question, I removed the tags. –  Eric Jul 11 '12 at 15:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You shouldn't be storing the entirety of the text file in memory; you should just write each line out to the file as you generate that line. When dealing with combinatorics such as this it gets quite easy to get very large values, so storing lots of information in memory that you don't need to should be avoided.

You should generate the string for a line, write that line to the non-human file, then append your ~ to the human readable file and append the same line. Doing this you won't even be doing any string concatenation, replacing, or anything. You'll just be writing to an output stream continually.

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This sounds like a good way of doing it, thanks! –  Eric Jul 11 '12 at 15:12

Porting from comments:

You can to use StringBuilder in this cases: instead of:

+= operator;

String.Concat() method;

String.Format() method.

In fact, the String.Format() method uses StringBuilder class internally, the .AppendFormat() method, but if you don't need to do formart it, Can .Append() be a bit faster than AppendFormat().

Also, why is do you storing it on variable instead of new text file(streamwriter.Write())?

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Writing to the file directly will reduce the overhead of string manipulation even more than using a stringbuilder, and also avoid the stress applied to memory. –  Servy Jul 11 '12 at 15:26

You become more performance with outputStringNormal = string.Format({0} SomeText, outputStringNormal) In C# string.Format is most effective way to concat strings. You shouldnt use string += string.

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StringBuilder can be more faster in this cases. –  Jack Jul 11 '12 at 15:02
    
@Jack Should I be using StringBuilder and then replacing values? or use two string builders? –  Eric Jul 11 '12 at 15:03
1  
@autumyst: You can to use StringBuilder in this cases: instead of: += operator; String.Concat() method; String.Format() method. In fact, the String.Format() method uses StringBuilder internally, the .AppendFormat() method, but if you don't need to do formart it, Can .Append() be a bit faster than AppendFormat(). Also, why is do you storing it on variable instead of new text file(stream.Write())? –  Jack Jul 11 '12 at 15:18

The writing to the file will most likely be your bottleneck. So make sure you do buffered output and flush the output as little as possible.

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