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I made a test to see if there is a difference between the time it takes to write a 1GB file on disk from a single byte array and writing another 1GB file from 1024 arrays (1MB each).

Test Writing many arrays
331.6902 ms
Test Writing big array
14756.7559 ms

For this test, the "many arrays" is actually a single byte[1024 * 1024] array that I write 1024 times using a for loop. The "big array" is just a 1GB byte array filled with random values.

Here's what the code looks like :

Console.WriteLine("Test Writing many arrays");

byte[] data = new byte[1048576];

for (int i = 0; i < 1048576; i++)
    data[i] = (byte)(i % 255);

FileStream file = new FileStream("test.txt", FileMode.Create);

sw1.Restart();

for (int i = 0; i < 1024; i++ )
     file.Write(data, 0, 1048576);

file.Close();
sw1.Stop();
s1 = sw1.Elapsed;
Console.WriteLine(s1.TotalMilliseconds);

Console.WriteLine("Test Writing big array");


 byte[] data2 = new byte[1073741824];

 for (int i = 0; i < 1073741824; i++)
      data2[i] = (byte)(i % 255);

 FileStream file2 = new FileStream("test2.txt", FileMode.Create);

 sw1.Restart();

 file2.Write(data2, 0, 1073741824);

 file2.Close();
 sw1.Stop();

 s1 = sw1.Elapsed;
 Console.WriteLine(s1.TotalMilliseconds);

I included the file.Close() inside the timed part, since it calls the Flush() method and writes the stream to the disk.

The resulting files are the exact same size.

I tought maybe C# can see that I always use the same array and it might optimize the iteration/writing process, but the result is not 2-3 times faster, it's about 45 times faster... Why?

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5  
I suspect it's not the part about writing the memory, it's about the temporary storage (ie 1gb in ram) that is causing the issue, causing hard-drive swapping from virtual memory. –  Matthew Jul 11 '12 at 15:02
3  
Another thing is cache hit/miss: You will have cache hit for 1MB of memory which remains the same throughout. This is less of a problem than page swapping, though. –  nhahtdh Jul 11 '12 at 15:03
    
It's also not really a fair comparison, is it? You're not closing the small array 1000 times, only once. –  Rotem Jul 11 '12 at 15:03
4  
You may want to add another test in which you write the big array using 1024 write operations and the correct offset / length. –  C.Evenhuis Jul 11 '12 at 15:05
    
@C.Evenhuis this is what i've done; setting the offset to 0 will start writing where the current stream is, which is the end of the file because I haven't seek nor close the FileStream. –  Alex Rose Jul 11 '12 at 15:31

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I think the major reason for the big difference is that the OS manages to cache almost the entire 1GB write that you do in small chunks.

You need to change the way your benchmark is set up: the code should write the same data, first time in 1024 chunks, and the second time in one chunk. You also need to turn off the caching of data in the OS by specifying FileOptions.WriteThrough, like this:

var sw1 = new Stopwatch();
Console.WriteLine("Test Writing many arrays");
var data = new byte[1073741824];
for (var i = 0; i < 1073741824; i++)
    data[i] = (byte)(i % 255);
var file = new FileStream("c:\\temp\\__test1.txt", FileMode.Create, FileSystemRights.WriteData, FileShare.None, 8, FileOptions.WriteThrough);
sw1.Restart();
for (int i = 0; i < 1024; i++)
    file.Write(data, i*1024, 1048576);
file.Close();
sw1.Stop();
var s1 = sw1.Elapsed;
Console.WriteLine(s1.TotalMilliseconds);
Console.WriteLine("Test Writing big array");
var file2 = new FileStream("c:\\temp\\__test2.txt", FileMode.Create, FileSystemRights.WriteData, FileShare.None, 8, FileOptions.WriteThrough);
sw1.Restart();
file2.Write(data, 0, 1073741824);
file2.Close();
sw1.Stop();
s1 = sw1.Elapsed;
Console.WriteLine(s1.TotalMilliseconds);

When you run this code, the results look as follows:

Test Writing many arrays
5234.5885
Test Writing big array
5032.3626
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The reason is likely to be that the single 1MB array is being held in main memory, but the 1GB array was swapped out to disk.

Therefore when writing the single array 1024 times, you were writing from memory to disk. If the destination file is contiguous, the HDD head doesn't have to move far during this process.

Writing the 1GB array once, you were reading from disk to memory then writing to disk, in all likelihood resulting in at least two HDD head movements for each write - first to read the block from the swapfile, then back to the destination file to write it.

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I don't think this is the case because I don't see much Read in the Resource Monitor and because while debugging I can see the array being held in memory and not moving the whole time. –  Alex Rose Jul 11 '12 at 15:51
    
It won't show as "read" it will show as "page fault", and you won't see it in the debugger. The job of the VMM is to make virtual memory invisible to programs - including the debugger. –  Ben Jul 11 '12 at 16:04
    
Ok it's good to know! But I still have a question: can the system swap a variable even though it's currently being used or it's in the current scope of the program? –  Alex Rose Jul 11 '12 at 16:37
    
@AlexRose, The Virtual Memory Manager doesn't know about variables, only memory, which it manages in 4KB pages. So if an array is larger than 4KB, then part of it may be swapped out. Only the part which is actually being read or written needs to be in physical memory. –  Ben Jul 13 '12 at 9:20

It could be related to how OS handles file writes. When writing 1GB using a single write call OS will have to pause writing many times to allow other processes use Disk I/O. And also you are not buffering writes. You may optimize the speeds by specifying a larger bufferSize.

public FileStream(
    SafeFileHandle handle,
    FileAccess access,
    int bufferSize
)
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