Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Our system is facing performance issues selecting rows out of a 38 million rows table.

This table with 38 million rows stores information from clients/suppliers etc. These appear across many other tables, such as Invoices.

The main problem is that our database is far from normalized. The Clients_Suppliers table has a composite key made of 3 columns, the Code - varchar2(16), Category - char(2) and the last one is up_date, a date. Every change in one client's address is stored in that same table with a new date. So we can have records such as this:

code             ca   up_date
---------------- --   --------
1234567890123456 CL   01/01/09
1234567890123456 CL   01/01/10
1234567890123456 CL   01/01/11
1234567890123456 CL   01/01/12
6543210987654321 SU   01/01/10
6543210987654321 SU   08/03/11

Worst, in every table that uses a client's information, instead of the full composite key, only the code and category is stored. Invoices, for instance, has its own keys, including the emission date. So we can have something like this:

invoice_no serial_no emission code             ca
---------- --------- -------- ---------------- --
1234567890 12345     05/02/12 1234567890123456 CL

My specific problem is that I have to generate a list of clients for which invoices where created in a given period. Since I have to get the most recent info from the clients, I have to use max(up_date).

So here's my query (in Oracle):

SELECT
  CL.CODE,
  CL.CATEGORY,
  -- other address fields
FROM
  CLIENTS_SUPPLIERS CL
  INVOICES I
WHERE
  CL.CODE = I.CODE AND
  CL.CATEGORY = I.CATEGORY AND
  CL.UP_DATE = 
    (SELECT
       MAX(CL2.UP_DATE)
     FROM
       CLIENTS_SUPPLIERS CL2
     WHERE
       CL2.CODE = I.CODE AND
       CL2.CATEGORY = I.CATEGORY AND
       CL2.UP_DATE <= I.EMISSION
    ) AND
  I.EMISSION BETWEEN DATE1 AND DATE2

It takes up to seven hours to select 178,000 rows. Invoices has 300,000 rows between DATE1 and DATE2.

It's a (very, very, very) bad design, and I've raised the fact that we should improve it, by normalizing the tables. That would involve creating a table for clients with a new int primary key for each pair of code/category and another one for Adresses (with the client primary key as a foreign key), then use the Adresses' primary key in each table that relates to clients.

But it would mean changing the whole system, so my suggestion has been shunned. I need to find a different way of improving performance (apparently using only SQL).

I've tried indexes, views, temporary tables but none have had any significant improvement on performance. I'm out of ideas, does anyone have a solution for this?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
this may sound ridiculous, but I was working with systems where just defragmenting the disk reduced query execution by 30 mins. –  Ale Tiro Jul 11 '12 at 15:06
    
that's not ridiculous. But 30 minutes is still a long time –  Sebas Jul 11 '12 at 15:13
    
That's not really a normalization problem, although it is veering into multi-domain territory. That mostly looks like a history table. Here's what you probably want to do. 1) Create a 'current' company table (or indexed view, if possible), minus the ca and up_date columns. This holds the 'most recent' data. Use a SP to update the table (or put a trigger on it) to feed your history table. Change the up_date column to updateAt (timestamp). 2) -optional- Drop the ca column, and create a suppliers table, containing just the code column. –  Clockwork-Muse Jul 11 '12 at 15:27
    
What is the explain plan? –  Vincent Malgrat Jul 11 '12 at 16:10

5 Answers 5

What does the DBA have to say?

Has he/she tried:

  • Coalescing the tablespaces
  • Increasing the parallel query slaves
  • Moving indexes to a separate tablespace on a separate physical disk
  • Gathering stats on the relevant tables/indexes
  • Running an explain plan
  • Running the query through the index optimiser

I'm not saying the SQL is perfect, but if performance it is degrading over time, the DBA really needs to be having a look at it.

share|improve this answer
    
Have you spoken to the DBA? There is definitely a tool that you can use where you pass it a query and it spits out a list of suggested indexes and stats to gather - along with the percentage performance increase. Been years since I used it, but it was either a Java or web app. This would be perfect as it would take away the guesswork. –  Robbie Dee Jul 12 '12 at 12:39
    
Thank you for these suggestions. I also forgot to say that we have no DBA. Which means it's every developer to himself (which also explains why the database is so messed up). Anyway, I am going to study those. –  Tarek Jul 13 '12 at 13:13
    
Is this a transactional database i.e. are there updates happening while you're running the query? The reason I ask is that the database will have to store a snapshot of the database when it starts running the query. If there is other activity on the database, this could impact your query significantly. –  Robbie Dee Jul 13 '12 at 14:58
    
Also, any such activity (depending on how the database is set up) could create archive logs (used for point in time recovery). If these are generated on the same physical disk as the tablespaces, this too could cause contention. Is it possible to clone the tables into a separate tablespace (along with the indexes) when you need to run the query? Tools like "Spotlight on Oracle" are invaluable for spotting bottlenecks on the database and for general monitoring. –  Robbie Dee Jul 13 '12 at 14:58
SELECT   
  CL2.CODE,
  CL2.CATEGORY,
  ... other fields
FROM 
  CLIENTS_SUPPLIERS CL2 INNER JOIN (
    SELECT DISTINCT
      CL.CODE,
      CL.CATEGORY,
      I.EMISSION
    FROM
      CLIENTS_SUPPLIERS CL INNER JOIN INVOICES I ON CL.CODE = I.CODE AND CL.CATEGORY = I.CATEGORY
    WHERE
      I.EMISSION BETWEEN DATE1 AND DATE2) CL3 ON CL2.CODE = CL3.CODE AND CL2.CATEGORY = CL3.CATEGORY
WHERE
  CL2.UP_DATE <= CL3.EMISSION
GROUP BY
  CL2.CODE,
  CL2.CATEGORY
HAVING
  CL2.UP_DATE = MAX(CL2.UP_DATE)

The idea is to separate the process: first we tell oracle to give us the list of clients for which there are the invoices of the period you want, and then we get the last version of them. In your version there's a check against MAX 38000000 times, which I really think is what costed most of the time spent in the query.

However, I'm not asking for indexes, assuming they are correctly setup...

share|improve this answer
    
I edited to take care of @AlexPoole comment on the post of Gordon –  Sebas Jul 11 '12 at 15:39
    
Hi, thanks for your answer! I'm going to try your query it sounds promissing. –  Tarek Jul 13 '12 at 13:29
    
ok, keep me posted :-) –  Sebas Jul 13 '12 at 13:46

Assuming that the number of rows for a (code,ca) is smallish, I would try to force an index scan per invoice with an inline view, such as:

SELECT invoice_id, 
       (SELECT MAX(rowid) KEEP (DENSE_RANK FIRST ORDER BY up_date DESC
          FROM clients_suppliers c
         WHERE c.code = i.code
           AND c.category = i.category
           AND c.up_date < i.invoice_date)
  FROM invoices i
 WHERE i.invoice_date BETWEEN :p1 AND :p2

You would then join this query to CLIENTS_SUPPLIERS hopefully triggering a join via rowid (300k rowid read is negligible).

You could improve the above query by using SQL objects:

CREATE TYPE client_obj AS OBJECT (
   name     VARCHAR2(50),
   add1     VARCHAR2(50),
   /*address2, city...*/
);

SELECT i.o.name, i.o.add1 /*...*/
  FROM (SELECT DISTINCT
               (SELECT client_obj(
                         max(name) KEEP (DENSE_RANK FIRST ORDER BY up_date DESC),
                         max(add1) KEEP (DENSE_RANK FIRST ORDER BY up_date DESC)
                         /*city...*/
                       ) o
                  FROM clients_suppliers c
                 WHERE c.code = i.code
                   AND c.category = i.category
                   AND c.up_date < i.invoice_date)
          FROM invoices i
         WHERE i.invoice_date BETWEEN :p1 AND :p2) i
share|improve this answer

The correlated subquery may be causing issues, but to me the real problem is in what seems to be your main client table, you cannot easily grab the most recent data without doing the max(up_date) mess. Its really a mix of history and current data, and as you describe poorly designed.

Anyway, it will help you in this and other long running joins to have a table/view with ONLY the most recent data for a client. So, first build a mat view for this (untested):

create or replace materialized view recent_clients_view
tablespace my_tablespace
nologging
build deferred
refresh complete on demand
as
select * from 
(
  select c.*, rownumber() over (partition by code, category order by up_date desc, rowid desc) rnum
  from clients c
)
where rnum = 1;

Add unique index on code,category. The assumption is that this will be refreshed periodically on some off hours schedule, and that your queries using this will be ok with showing data AS OF the date of the last refresh. In a DW env or for reporting, this is usually the norm.

The snapshot table for this view should be MUCH smaller than the full clients table with all the history.

Now, you are doing an joining invoice to this smaller view, and doing an equijoin on code,category (where emission between date1 and date2). Something like:

select cv.*
from 
recent_clients_view cv,
invoices i
where cv.code = i.code
and cv.category = i.category
and i.emission between :date1 and :date2;

Hope that helps.

share|improve this answer

You might try rewriting the query to use analytic functions rather than a correlated subquery:

select *
from (SELECT CL.CODE, CL.CATEGORY,   -- other address fields
             max(up_date) over (partition by cl.code, cl.category) as max_up_date
      FROM CLIENTS_SUPPLIERS CL join
           INVOICES I
           on CL.CODE = I.CODE AND
              CL.CATEGORY = I.CATEGORY and
              I.EMISSION BETWEEN DATE1 AND DATE2 and
              up_date <= i.emission
     ) t
where t.up_date = max_up_date

You might want to remove the max_up_date column in the outside select.

As some have noticed, this query is subtly different from the original, because it is taking the max of up_date over all dates. The original query has the condition:

CL2.UP_DATE <= I.EMISSION

However, by transitivity, this means that:

CL2.UP_DATE <= DATE2

So the only difference is when the max of the update date is less than DATE1 in the original query. However, these rows would be filtered out by the comparison to UP_DATE.

Although this query is phrased slightly differently, I think it does the same thing. I must admit to not being 100% positive, since this is a subtle situation on data that I'm not familiar with.

share|improve this answer
2  
I think the clause CL2.UP_DATE <= I.EMISSION in the original query implies it should report that address as it was on the emission date, which complicates things a bit –  Alex Poole Jul 11 '12 at 15:29
    
@AlexPoole see the edited response. I'm pretty sure this query does the same thing, because there are several conditions on the up_date date in the original query. –  Gordon Linoff Jul 11 '12 at 15:49
    
I'm not sure the transitivity comment is right. I agree that CL2.UP_DATE must be <= DATE2, but you could have a CL2.UP_DATE that lies between I.EMISSION and DATE2? You'll get the last address within the DATE1 to DATE2 range, but not necessarily the one that was current on EMIISION. But, I'm also not 100% positive now... –  Alex Poole Jul 11 '12 at 15:52
    
Alex Poole is right. CL2.UP_DATE must be <= I.EMISSION. Also, I'm not familiar with this analytic function, but wouldn't it select the maximum up_date from CL grouped by code and category regardless of date1 and date2? Still, I'm going to study those functions and see what I can do! Thank you! –  Tarek Jul 13 '12 at 13:24
    
@user1042273 . . .I added the clause "up_date <= i.emission" within the query. I can only say that leaving this out was an oversight on my part (for transitivity to work, there needs to be a relationship between these variables). As for the analytic function, it operates after the where clause filters the data. –  Gordon Linoff Jul 13 '12 at 13:33

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.