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I'm testing a simple DAO layer with mockito but I found a problem, basically a hard to test interface and I was wondering if you could give me some insight...

This is the method I want to test:

public Person getById(UserId id) {
    final Person person = new PersonImpl();

    gateway.executeQuery(GET_SQL + id.getUserId(), new ResultSetCommand(){
      public int work(ResultSet rs) throws SQLException {
        if(rs.next()){
          person.getName().setGivenName(rs.getString("name"));
          person.getName().setFamilyName(rs.getString("last_name"));
        }
        return 0;
      }
    });
    return person;
  }

I use a DatabaseGateway that is my interface between java code and SQL, and that method accepts an anonymous class, this is the method executeQuery of the gateway:

 public int executeQuery(String sql, ResultSetCommand cmd) {
    try{
      Connection cn =  createConnection();
      PreparedStatement st = cn.prepareStatement(sql);
      int result = cmd.work(st.executeQuery());
      cn.close();
      return result;
    }catch(Exception e){
      throw new RuntimeException("Cannot Create Statement for sql " + sql,e);
    }
  }

The thing is that, because of that anonymous class, It's getting harder to test PersonDAO.

I can refactor the whole code, even remove the anonymous class if someone suggest a better design (I'm sure there's a simpler one, but I just can't seem to find it).

Thanks everyone for the suggestions.

PD: if you need further information, feel free to ask


EDIT: Test that's hard to do

public void testGetPersonById(){
    DatabaseGateway gateway = mock(DatabaseGateway.class);
    when(gateway.executeQuery(anyString(),any(ResultSetCommand.class)));
    PersonDAO person_dao = new PersonDAOImpl(gateway);

    Person p = person_dao.getById(new UserId(Type.viewer,"100"));
  }

See? ResultCommand is part of the mock, and I'm interested in testing that code too... should I do a separate test for that specific command?

share|improve this question
    
Please give an example of a test that's getting harder to do. –  John Saunders Jul 17 '09 at 14:24
    
I don't know Java well, but I'd say that ResultSetCommand is not relevant. You're testing getPersonById to make sure it returns the correct Person when given a valid UserId, throws an exception when given an invalid one, etc. If it works properly, you don't care that it uses a particular ResultSetCommand. –  John Saunders Jul 17 '09 at 14:35

2 Answers 2

Instead of using anonymous classes, you could create an interface and its implementation separately. The method executeQuery would then have a String and this interface as a parameter.

So your test would remain the same. You would be able to separate the work method in another test (the test for your interface implementation), which looks like is the hard thing to test.

The result would be something like:

public Person getById(UserId id) {
    final Person person = new PersonImpl();

    gateway.executeQuery(GET_SQL + id.getUserId(), new MyInterfaceImpl(person));
    return person;
}

,

public int executeQuery(String sql, MyInterface cmd) {
    try{
      Connection cn =  createConnection();
      PreparedStatement st = cn.prepareStatement(sql);
      int result = cmd.work(st.executeQuery());
      cn.close();
      return result;
    }catch(Exception e){
      throw new RuntimeException("Cannot Create Statement for sql " + sql,e);
    }
  }
share|improve this answer
    
So you say I make 2 tests, one for PersonDAO and another for the (not anymore) anonymous ResultSetCommand class? –  Pablo Fernandez Jul 17 '09 at 14:47
    
@Pablo Yes, the tests would be separate (considering you want to unit test it, and not do an integration test). If you want a "bigger picture test", you could make your executeQuery return just the ResultSet, and use it in your PersonDAO. See what makes most sense for you –  Samuel Carrijo Jul 17 '09 at 14:51
    
I first tried that approach (returning the RS) but it threw strange errors, I believe because the RS couldn't work with the connection closed or something like that, and I didn't want to give the caller the responsibility of closing either the RS or the connection –  Pablo Fernandez Jul 17 '09 at 15:03
    
@Pablo I believe you're right about the RS statements. You would need to close the connection outside (agree it's a bad idea). If you have any problem with my suggestion, just tell. But personally, I see no problem in testing the "work" method separately (it is even easier to find the error if a test breaks) –  Samuel Carrijo Jul 17 '09 at 15:14
    
No. It's fine I think. If no one comes with a better answer this would be the accepted one –  Pablo Fernandez Jul 17 '09 at 15:33

You could get fancy and "capture" the ResultSetCommand arg, then simulate the callback on it with a mock ResultSet:

/**
 * Custom matcher - always returns true, but captures the
 * ResultSetCommand param
 */
class CaptureArg extends ArgumentMatcher<ResultSetCommand> {
    ResultSetCommand resultSetCommand;
    public boolean matches(Object resultSetCommand) {
         resultSetCommand = resultSetCommand;
         return true;
    }
}

public void testGetPersonById(){
    // setup expectations...
    final String lastName = "Smith";
    final String firstName = "John";
    final CaptureArg captureArg = new CaptureArg();
    DatabaseGateway gateway = mock(DatabaseGateway.class);
    ResultSet mockResultSet = mock(ResultSet.class);
    when(gateway.executeQuery(anyString(), argThat(captureArg) ));
    when(mockResultSet.next()).thenReturn(Boolean.True);
    when(mockResultSet.getString("name")).thenReturn(firstName);
    when(mockResultSet.getString("last_name")).thenReturn(lastName);

    // run the test...
    PersonDAO person_dao = new PersonDAOImpl(gateway);
    Person p = person_dao.getById(new UserId(Type.viewer,"100"));

    // simulate the callback...
    captureArg.resultSetCommand.work(mockResultSet);

    // verify
    assertEquals(firstName, person.getName().getGivenName());
    assertEquals(lastName, person.getName().getFamilyName());
}

I'm conflicted as to whether I like this - it exposes a lot of the internals of the method you're testing. But at least it's an option.

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