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I'm trying to use AudioTrack to generate sine, square, and sawtooth waves. However, the audio this is creating doesn't sound like a pure sine wave, but like it has some kind of other wave overlayed. How would I go about getting the pure sine wave like in the second code example, while using the method in my first example? Since the top example only moves around some of the arithmetic used in the second, shouldn't they produce an identical wave?

@Override
        protected Void doInBackground(Void... foo) {
            short[] buffer = new short[1024];
            this.track = new AudioTrack(AudioManager.STREAM_MUSIC, 44100, AudioFormat.CHANNEL_CONFIGURATION_MONO, AudioFormat.ENCODING_PCM_16BIT, minBufferSize, AudioTrack.MODE_STREAM);
            float samples[] = new float[1024];

            this.track.play();

            while (true) {
                for (int i = 0; i < samples.length; i++) {
                    samples[i] = (float) Math.sin( (float)i * ((float)(2*Math.PI) * frequency / 44100));    //the part that makes this a sine wave....
                    buffer[i] = (short) (samples[i] * Short.MAX_VALUE);
                }
                this.track.write( buffer, 0, samples.length );  //write to the audio buffer.... and start all over again!

            }           
        }

Note: This does give me a pure sine wave:

@Override
        protected Void doInBackground(Void... foo) {
            short[] buffer = new short[1024];
            this.track = new AudioTrack(AudioManager.STREAM_MUSIC, 44100, AudioFormat.CHANNEL_CONFIGURATION_MONO, AudioFormat.ENCODING_PCM_16BIT, minBufferSize, AudioTrack.MODE_STREAM);
            float increment = (float)(2*Math.PI) * frequency / 44100; // angular increment for each sample
            float angle = 0;
            float samples[] = new float[1024];

            this.track.play();

            while (true) {
                for (int i = 0; i < samples.length; i++) {
                    samples[i] = (float) Math.sin(angle);   //the part that makes this a sine wave....
                    buffer[i] = (short) (samples[i] * Short.MAX_VALUE);
                    angle += increment;
                }
                this.track.write( buffer, 0, samples.length );  //write to the audio buffer.... and start all over again!

            }           
        }

Thanks to Martijn: The problem is that the wave is getting cut off between wavelengths in the buffer. Increasing the buffer size solves the problem in the second example. It appears that the Math.PI * 2 arithmetic was the most intensive of the loop, so moving that value to an external variable that is only computed once solves everything.

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2  
It sounds like you might be hearing some aliasing or clipping. Try reducing the amplitude of the sound wave you are generating. –  Robert Harvey Jul 11 '12 at 15:50
1  
So why not use the code that works? I'm not sure what your question is. –  Robert Harvey Jul 11 '12 at 15:51
    
Robert, I want to also create square and sawtooth waves, but the whole angle and increment idea confuses me when dealing with higher level wave functions. –  K. Barresi Jul 11 '12 at 15:51
1  
Try to optimise your code by 1) increase buffer size, 2) prepare the buffer once, and keep rewriting it to the output stream (this will require some math calculating the perfect size for the buffer to make sure that the whole sine wave fits perfectly in it). –  Martijn Courteaux Jul 11 '12 at 16:06
2  
Oh I see what you mean now. As in the buffer may be ending the wave between a full wavelength, causing the wave to deform at the beginning and end of every buffer push? –  K. Barresi Jul 11 '12 at 17:26
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2 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try to optimise your code by

  1. increase buffer size
  2. prepare the buffer once, and keep rewriting it to the output stream (this will require some math calculating the perfect size for the buffer to make sure that the whole sine wave fits perfectly in it).

Why? Because I suspect the buffer to taking to long to prepare, what causes a lag between two buffer pushes to big, which might be causing the noise.

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The only material difference that I can see in your two code samples is that the equation in your first example contains an integer (I), and therefore you're probably doing integer (not floating-point) arithmetic. This would cause a staircasing effect, adding unwanted harmonics to your waveform.

I suspect that if you simply cast I to a float in your equation, it will produce a pure sine wave.

samples[i] 
    = (float) Math.sin( (float)i * ((float)(2*Math.PI) * frequency / 44100));
share|improve this answer
    
Robert, I tried it and it doesn't seem to solve the problem. I'm still getting some sort of harmonic over the sine wave. At this point I'm more curious as to why the two examples produce different waves, since the arithmetic behind them should be the same. –  K. Barresi Jul 11 '12 at 17:22
    
Casting the i to a float will not effect the calculation at all. –  you786 Jul 11 '12 at 17:32
    
@you786 Yeah, alright. I think we've already established that. –  Robert Harvey Jul 11 '12 at 17:32
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