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I am using LINQ to retrieve Account type entities from Microsoft Dynamics CRM Online. I am unable to filter the list for a particular formatted value. I have the correct value, but am receiving zero records. I'm creating my connection like this:

var connection = new CrmConnection("CRMOnline");
connection.ProxyTypesEnabled = true;
CrmOrganizationServiceContext _context = new CrmOrganizationServiceContext(connection);

I've tried:

List<Account> items = _context.CreateQuery<Account>()
                              .Where( c => ((OptionSetValue)c["new_accreditationstatus"]).Equals(7))
                              .ToList();

and

List<Account> items = _context.CreateQuery<Account>()
                              .Where( c => c.GetFormattedAttributeValue("new_accreditationstatus") == "7"
                              .ToList();

and

List<Account> items = _context.CreateQuery<Account>()
                              .Where( c => c["new_accreditationstatus"] == "7"
                              .ToList();

The last on throws a System.Format exception.

Filters on normal properties, i.e. .Where(c => c.AccountNumber.StartsWith("2010")) work perfectly fine.

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1  
If you're enabling proxy types, why is the Account.new_accreditationstatus have to be accessed by string key value? Doesn't it have a property accessor created for it? –  Daryl Jul 11 '12 at 19:01
    
What type of field is new_accreditationstatus? –  glosrob Jul 11 '12 at 19:01
    
@Daryl it does not. It's only available in the attributed collection. I did not set up the database, nor do I have access except via the web service. –  Steve Mallory Jul 11 '12 at 19:36
    
@glosrob: new_accreditationstatus looks to be of type OptionSetValue, based on the cast above. –  Peter Majeed Jul 11 '12 at 19:37
2  
@SteveMallory you should be able to recreate your early bound objects using the CrmSdkUtil. When you do that, it'll create a new early bound C# file that will contain an Account.new_accreditationstatus property. The only thing it uses are the web services to create the file. –  Daryl Jul 11 '12 at 20:19

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can only get access to the _____Set entities when generating the early-bound CRM file (look into crmsvcutil.exe/Xrm.cs online) and creating an early-bound derivative of CrmOrganizationServiceContext (commonly called XrmServiceContext). You can see the available constructors in the early-bound file.

So if you know the (int) value of the OptionSetValue in advance (7, in this case), you can just use this value as one of the arguments in the Where clause, as you've stated elsewhere:

.Where( c => c.new_AccreditationStatus.Value == 7)
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For future reference: The utility comes with the SDK. The help is at link –  Steve Mallory Jul 11 '12 at 21:36

EDIT (try this):

var list = _context.AccountSet.Where(c => 
                     c.FormattedValues["new_accreditationstatus"] == "7").ToList();
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That raised another exception: System.NotSupportedException - Invalid 'where' condition. An entity member is invoking an invalid property or method –  Steve Mallory Jul 11 '12 at 16:50
    
Can you show in code your _context object creation? –  EkoostikMartin Jul 11 '12 at 17:04
    
edited the question. –  Steve Mallory Jul 11 '12 at 17:48
    
Edited my answer –  EkoostikMartin Jul 11 '12 at 17:56
    
@EkoosstikMartin Strangely enough, I do not have that (or any) collection built in to the context object. I am extremely new to Dynamics CRM Online, so I may be missing an obvious setting. –  Steve Mallory Jul 11 '12 at 18:52

Another great question, but unfortunately, I think this will represent another failure/"limitation" of the Linq provider, which doesn't mention anything about FormattedValues as one of the permitted uses of the Where clause, though it is permitted as an item in the Select clause.

The actual values for OptionSetValues are stored in the StringMap entity, and incidentally enough, you can access the StringMap entity via Linq. An example is as follows.

// This query gets one permissible value for this entity and field.
var actualValue = _context.CreateQuery("stringmap")
    .Where(x => x.GetAttributeValue<string>("attributename") == "new_accreditationstatus")
    .Where(x => x.GetAttributeValue<int>("value") == "7")
    .Where(x => x.GetAttributeValue<int>("objecttypecode") == Account.EntityTypeCode)
    .Select(x => x.GetAttributeValue<string>("value"))
    .Single();

However, trying to build on this with a subquery and a version of your original query, as in the below, results in an exception, also below.

var actualValues = _context.CreateQuery("stringmap")
    .Where(x => x.GetAttributeValue<string>("attributename") == "new_accreditationstatus")
    .Where(x => x.GetAttributeValue<int>("objecttypecode") == Xrm.Account.EntityTypeCode);

// This (modified) query uses the StringMap values from the previous query in
// a subquery, linking to the int (attributevalue) value that
// new_accreditationstatus represents.
List<Account> items = _context.CreateQuery<Account>()
    .Where(c => actualValues
        .Where(x => x.GetAttributeValue<int>("attributevalue") == c.new_accreditationstatus.Value)
        .Select(x => x.GetAttributeValue<string>("attributevalue"))
        .Single() == "7")
    .ToList();

...throws an exception.

Privilege Type Read not defined on entity 'StringMap'.

Which is of course frustrating, because somehow, Linq allows you to query the string map in the first query.

So you'll have to first query the StringMap entity for the AttributeValue that corresponds to "7", then use that value in a new query that references that value as follows:

var actualValue = _context.CreateQuery("stringmap")
    .Where(x => x.GetAttributeValue<string>("attributename") == "new_accreditationstatus")
    .Where(x => x.GetAttributeValue<int>("value") == "7")
    .Where(x => x.GetAttributeValue<int>("objecttypecode") == Account.EntityTypeCode)
    .Select(x => x.GetAttributeValue<string>("attributevalue"))
    .Single();

List<Account> items = _context.CreateQuery<Account>()
    .Where(c => c.new_accreditationstatus = new OptionSetValue(actualValue)
    .ToList();

If I can ever find a way to do all of this in one query, I will definitely edit and repost.

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