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Alright, so I'm reading a file that looks like:

File: namehere

Category1<br>
Category2<br>
Category3<br>
Info1<br>
Info2<br>
Info3<br>

File: namehere

Category1<br>
Category2<br>
Category3<br>
Info1<br>
Info2<br>
Info3<br>

And so forth.

There are always the same number of categories and they always have the same names, however the information that follows them differs. There may be less information than there are categories, and the information will contain different things.

I want to capture the stuff that is just the information, so my original thought was to set it to capture between Category3 and File. However, this isn't working, probably for some clear reason that just isn't evident to me.

Here's what I'm using

if ( /Category1([\s\S]+?)File/ ) {
  push(@files, $1);
  print @files;

I'm getting nothing for @files and I think that's because the code I have provided only searches for a line with those two words and captures what's between them, not the whole file. Any help/suggestions?


EDIT:

How would I alter it if I was reading something like this:

File: namehere

Category1<br>
Category2<br>
Category3<br>
Info1<br>
Info2<br>
Info3<br>

Info1<br>
Info2<br>
Info3<br>

Info1<br>
Info2<br>
share|improve this question
    
The string Category3 doesn't appear in your data, and you are using Category1. Please resolve which it is that you mean. Also, does your data really have the <br> tags in it? –  Borodin Jul 11 '12 at 17:38
    
Please also show the output you would like –  Borodin Jul 11 '12 at 17:49

4 Answers 4

up vote -1 down vote accepted
#! /usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;

my %hoa;  # a hash of arrays: key = file name each array element is
          # the info1, info2 etc that is listed under the file name
my $key;

open(F, "$ARGV[0]");

while (<F>) {
  chomp;
  if (/File/) {
    my @line = split /:/;
    $key = $line[1];
  }

  if (/Info/) {
    push @{ $hoa{$key} }, $_;
  }
}

foreach my $k ( sort keys %hoa ) {
  my @list = @{ $hoa{$k} };
  foreach my $l (@list) {
    print $k, "\t", $l, "\n";
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is great, thanks! One question though. If there are multiple sets of info1, how would I capture those too? I'm editing my example to show you exactly what I mean –  user1440061 Jul 11 '12 at 17:28

This looks like a job for $RS!

Too many people find it hard to switch from a perspective of scanning lines, to the Perl perspective where lines are only one kind of record you might want to scan. If you change the record separator, you will be getting more logical records. Then you can specify the pattern you want to scan for, find out where it stops and take the rest of the record

use English qw<$RS>;
use English qw<@LAST_MATCH_END>;

local $RS = "\n\n"; 

while ( <$in> ) {
    next unless m/^Category3.*\n/m;
    push @data, substr( $_, $LAST_MATCH_END[0] );
}
  • Since we only use the m switch ("multiline"), the . character still means anything but a newline.
  • Since we match up to the carriage return, we should get everything left in the record. Although we might not want the "\n\n" on the end.

Admittedly, this approach makes File: filename it's own "record", but it gets you a little closer, anyway.

share|improve this answer

It is very hard to tell exactly what you want, but perhaps it is to print the input file without all the Category information?

This one-line Perl program will do that for you

perl -ne "print unless /^Category/" myfile

output

File: namehere

Info1<br>
Info2<br>
Infor3<br>

File: namehere

Info1<br>
Info2<br>
Info3<br>
share|improve this answer

I find such tasks must be "quick'n'dirty":

Example file:

$ cat a.txt
File: namehere

Category1
Category2
Category3
Info1
Info2
Infor3

File: namehere

Category1
Category2
Category3
Info1
Info2
Infor3

Solution:

$ perl -le 'local $/= undef; $_ = <>; 
        @g = map {/^Category3$\s*(.*?)\s*\z/ms; $1} 
            grep{/Category3/} 
            split /^File:.*$/m; 
        print for @g' a.txt
Info1
Info2
Infor3
Info1
Info2
Infor3
share|improve this answer

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