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I'm learning C# from a book and i'm expanding on an example in an effort to better understand the syntax.

I'm trying to use the following code to cycle through a collection of objects and pick out only certain ones so I can load them into a separate array. I'm struggling with this particular line right now:

if (animalCollection[i].Equals(Chicken))

Here is the complete code for Program.cs

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace Ch11Ex02
{
class Program
    {
    static void Main(string[] args)
        {
        Animals animalCollection = new Animals();
        animalCollection.Add(new Cow("Jack"));
        animalCollection.Add(new Chicken("Vera"));
        animalCollection.Add(new Chicken("Sally"));

        Animal[] birds = new Animal[2];
        for (int i = 0; i < animalCollection.Count; i++)
            {
            if (animalCollection[i].Equals(Chicken))
                birds[i] = animalCollection[i];
            }

        foreach (Animal myAnimal in animalCollection)
            {
            myAnimal.Feed();
            }
        Console.ReadKey();
        }
    }
}

My goal is to load only object types Chicken into a new array called birds.

here is the code for class Animal:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace Ch11Ex02
{
public abstract class Animal
    {
    protected string name;

    public string Name
        {
        get
            {
            return name;
            }
        set
            {
            name = value;
            }
        }

    public Animal()
        {
        name = "The animal with no name";
        }

    public Animal(string newName)
        {
        name = newName;
        }

    public void Feed()
        {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} has been fed." , name);
        }

    internal bool equals()
        {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
        }
    }
}

and here is the code for class Chicken:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace Ch11Ex02
{
public class Chicken : Animal
    {
    public void LayEgg()
        {
        Console.WriteLine("{0} has laid an egg." , name);
        }
    public Chicken(string newName): base(newName)
        {
        }
    }
}

and here is the code for class Animals:

using System;
using System.Collections;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace Ch11Ex02
{
public class Animals : CollectionBase
    {
    public void Add(Animal newAnimal)
        {
        List.Add(newAnimal);
        }

    public void Remove(Animal newAnimal)
        {
        List.Remove(newAnimal);
        }

    public Animals()
        {
        }

    public Animal this[int animalIndex]
        {
        get
            {
            return (Animal)List[animalIndex];
            }
        set
            {
            List[animalIndex] = value;
            }
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Fundamentals

To determine whether an object is of a given type, you can use typeof or is

if (typeof(someObject) == typeof(Chicken))

or

 if (someObject is Chicken)

so specifically in your case

if (animalCollection[i].Equals(Chicken))

becomes

if (typeof(animalCollection[i]) == typeof(Chicken))

or

if (animalCollection[i] is Chicken)

You can also determine an object's type like this

Type t = animalCollection[i].GetType();

The Fast Way

Now that I have covered how this works at a basic level, here's a way to accomplish the same in one line, using Linq

var chickens = animals.OfType<Chicken>().ToArray();

By the Way

If you then wanted to get the type name as a string, you could do this

string typeName = t.FullName;
share|improve this answer
    
This answer wasn't here when I was adding my comment to 2 Bob Vale's answer. Kudos for explaining typeof and is! –  C B Jul 11 '12 at 16:28
    
This is fantastic. many thanks. –  dwstein Jul 11 '12 at 16:51
    
Ended up going this rout to get what I want ` foreach (Animal myAnimal in animalCollection) { myAnimal.Feed(); if (myAnimal is Chicken) ((Chicken)myAnimal).LayEgg(); }` –  dwstein Jul 11 '12 at 17:11
    
Upvoted this answer as well. It now includes "both" answers, and the "why" of things. Very nice! –  C B Jul 11 '12 at 17:18

Linq could do this for you in one statement

var birds=animals.OfType<Chicken>().ToArray();
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I was coming to say, except I wouldn't have used var since the user is just learning. What you get is Chicken[] chickens = animals.OfType<Chicken>().ToArray(); –  C B Jul 11 '12 at 16:19
1  
Not used var "because he's learning" but use Linq without covering what Linq is doing under the covers? –  Eric J. Jul 11 '12 at 16:19
    
Sure, when learning you have to know what arguments to pass to the method, and what arguments come back from the method. You don't need to know what goes on in the black box of the method itself. Particularly if you're not using VS or something with intellisense that explicitly tells you what comes back. I still marked it as the right answer. :-P –  C B Jul 11 '12 at 16:24
1  
Linq is a very powerful abstraction and I love it. But it's important for a new Engineer to know what Linq is abstracting away. I see too many young developers doing without knowing because they don't learn the fundamentals. –  Eric J. Jul 11 '12 at 16:30

you can use the is operator or typeof

 if (animalCollection[i] is Chicken)
            birds[i] = animalCollection[i];

or typeof

 if (typeof(animalCollection[i]) == typeof(Chicken))
            birds[i] = animalCollection[i];
share|improve this answer

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