Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the below awk command-line argument and it works aside from the fact it performs the print argument on the entire file (as expected). I would like it to just perform the formatting on the last 10 lines of the file (or any arbitrary number). Any suggestions are greatly appreciated, thanks!

I know one solution would be to pipe it with tail, but would like to stick with a pure awk solution.

awk '{print "<category label=\"" $13 " " $14 " " $15 "\"/>"}' foofile
share|improve this question

7 Answers 7

up vote 9 down vote accepted

There is no need to be orthodox with a language or tool on the Unix shell.

tail -10 foofile | awk '{print "<category label=\"" $13 " " $14 " " $15 "\"/>"}'

is a good solution. And, you already had it.

Your arbitrary number can still be used as an argument to tail, nothing is lost;
solution does not lose any elegance.

share|improve this answer
1  
+1 For the Unix philosophy - little orthogonal tools that do their thing well. –  Eclipse Jul 17 '09 at 15:05

Using ring buffers, this one-liner prints last 10 lines;

awk '{a[NR%10]=$0}END{for(i=NR+1;i<=NR+10;i++)print a[i%10]}'

then, you can merge "print last 10 lines" and "print specific columns" like below;

{
    arr_line[NR % 10] = $0;
}

END {
    for (i = NR + 1; i <= NR + 10; i++) {
        split(arr_line[i % 10], arr_field);
        print "<category label=\"" arr_field[13] " " \
                                   arr_field[14] " " \
                                   arr_field[15] "\"/>";
    }
}
share|improve this answer

I don't think this can be tidily done in awk. The only way you can do it is to buffer the last X lines, and then print them in the END block.

I think you'll be better off sticking with tail :-)

share|improve this answer

Just for last 10 rows

awk 'BEGIN{OFS="\n"}
{
   a=b;b=c;c=d;d=e;e=f;f=g;g=h;h=i;i=j;j=$0
}END{    
    print a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i,j
}' file
share|improve this answer

In the case of variable # of columns, i have worked out two solutions

#cutlast [number] [[$1] [$2] [$3]...]

function cutlast {
    length=${1-1}; shift
    list=( ${@-`cat /proc/${$}/fd/0`} )
    output=${list[@]:${#list[@]}-${length-1}}
    test -z "$output" && exit 1 || echo $output && exit 0
}
#example:  cutlast 2 one two three print print # echo`s print print
#example1: echo one two three four print print | cutlast 2 # echo`s print print

or

function cutlast {
    length=${1-1}; shift
    list=( ${@-`cat /proc/${$}/fd/0`} )
    aoutput=${@-`cat /proc/${$}/fd/0`} | rev | cut -d ' ' -f-$num | rev
    test -z "$output" && exit 1 || echo $output && exit 0
}

#example:  cutlast 2 one two three print print # echo`s print print
share|improve this answer

There is loads of awk one liners in this text document, not sure if any of those will help.

This specifically might be what you're after (something similar anyway):

# print the last 2 lines of a file (emulates "tail -2")
awk '{y=x "\n" $0; x=$0};END{print y}'
share|improve this answer
awk '{ y=x "\n" $0; x=$0 }; END { print y }'

This is very inefficient: what it does is reading the whole file line by line only to print the last two lines.
Because there is no seek() statement in awk it is recommended to use tail to print the last lines of a file.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.