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I have two associative arrays:

ArrayA = array( [10] => ten
                [12] => twelve
                [22] => 10
                [30] => 10, 12, 8
         )
ArrayB = array( [10] => net
                [12] => evlewt
                [22] => 11, 12, 10
                [30] => 10
         )

The values of same keys on both arrays need to be compared. Some keys have CSV values and that can be on both the arrays.

For instance, [22] on ArrayA should be checked in CSV on ArrayB. Likewise, [30] in ArrayB should be checked in CSV on ArrayA. Others should be compared as usual ==

Note: I am trying to avoid a looping here. We can certainly do this in multiple ways with Loop. I am wondering if there is a quick and efficient way to do this without looping.

Edit: To clarify further, this is how these two should be compared:

Is "ten" in ArrayA == "net" in ArrayB?
Is "twelve" in ArrayA == "evlewt" in ArrayB?
Is 10 in ArrayA existing in (11, 12, 10) of ArrayB?
Is (10, 12, 8) of ArrayA containing the 10 ArrayB?
share|improve this question
    
What are you looking for? Do you need to know if both arrays are the same? Do you need to know which array keys have the same values? –  KSiimson Jul 11 '12 at 16:49
    
@KSiimson These two arrays are going to have SAME set of keys always. the values may change. I just want to compare the values and see if they are same. but the issue is with CSV values like I explained above. –  Kevin Rave Jul 11 '12 at 16:54
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1 Answer

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I hope I understand the question correctly. If you normalize the data first you can just compare the arrays

For instance:

$a = array(
    10 => 'net',
    12 => 'evlewt',
    22 => '10,12,11',
    30 => '12,10'
);

$b = array(
    10 => 'net',
    12 => 'evlewt',
    22 => '11,12,10',
    30 => '12,10'
);

function normalize(&$value, $key) {
    $value = explode(',', $value);
    sort($value);
    $value = implode(',', $value);
}

array_walk($a, 'normalize');
array_walk($b, 'normalize');

var_dump($a == $b); // outputs true

EDIT: In order to evaluate two arrays by whether an element in either array is a subset of another, I would normalize values to array and use the reduce_array() function.

<?php
$a = array(
    10 => 'net',
    12 => 'evlew',
    22 => '10,12,11',
    30 => '12,10,11'
);

$b = array(
    10 => 'net',
    12 => 'evlewt',
    22 => '11,12,10',
    30 => '12,10'
);

function normalize(&$value, $key) {
    $value = explode(',', $value);
}

function compare_value($v, $w) {
    if (false === $v) return false;
    global $a, $b;
    if(is_subset($a[$w], $b[$w]) || is_subset($b[$w], $a[$w]))
        return true;
    return false;
}

function is_subset($needle, $haystack) {
     return count(array_intersect($needle, $haystack)) === count($needle);
}

array_walk($a, 'normalize');
array_walk($b, 'normalize');

$result = array_reduce(array_keys($a), 'compare_value', true);
var_dump($result); // outputs false

$a = array(
    10 => 'net',
    12 => 'evlewt',
    22 => '10',
    30 => '12,10,11'
);

$b = array(
    10 => 'net',
    12 => 'evlewt',
    22 => '11,12,10',
    30 => '12,10'
);

array_walk($a, 'normalize');
array_walk($b, 'normalize');

$result = array_reduce(array_keys($a), 'compare_value', true);
var_dump($result); // outputs true
share|improve this answer
    
I guess you did NOT get my question. Element 22 can have multiple values (CSV) in ArrayA, while same element in ArryB can have only one value. The value for the element 22 in ArrayB should be in CSV of the same element in ArrayA. –  Kevin Rave Jul 11 '12 at 17:48
    
Same applies vice varsa. –  Kevin Rave Jul 11 '12 at 17:49
1  
So if an element is CSV in ArrayA, it cannot be CSV in ArrayB, and if an element is CSV in ArrayB, it cannot be CSV in ArrayA? Or what happens if both are CSVs? –  KSiimson Jul 11 '12 at 18:08
    
Both can be CSVs too. :-). Except this case, I guess if there is something like "IN" operator to compare the arrays, we can compare by adding some padding at the beginning and end of the each value. Like ",test,", in ",tset," and ",10," IN ",12,10,13,", etc. Not sure if anything is available. :-) –  Kevin Rave Jul 11 '12 at 18:29
    
There is a function in_array($needle, $haystack). It is unclear to me what do you expect if both are CSVs. Do the CSVs have to be the same, or does left have to be subset of right, or does right have to be subset of left? –  KSiimson Jul 11 '12 at 18:32
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