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Having a function defined in commons.php

desktop.php -> include commons.php
    |
    |
   \|/
    include MODULES.'mod.php'

I can call my custom function anywhere I want, but not inside an exit that's inside an if. The code where calling the function won't go:

Mod.php:

....
$error = mysql_error();

if($_ADM['id_user']==1) {
    if(!empty($error)) {
        $debug = array(
                    'message' => "SQL Error in infography_edit module.",
                    'line'    => '79',
                    'error'   => $error,
                    'SQL'     => $SQL
                );
        //exit(myPrint($debug)); //Calling here myPrint does not work
          exit(print_r($debug)); //This works
     }
 }

 $test = array('alex');
 exit(myPrint($debug)); //Calling here myPrint works

....

// The output error: Call to undefined function myPrint()

I just can't understand why anywhere else outside the code above works, but not inside it without defining it again inside

UPDATE

Doing it this way, doesn't seem to work either:

myPrint($debug);
exit();
// The output error: Call to undefined function myPrint()

UPDATE2

desktop.php the main file:

  1. require(LIBS.'commons.php');
  2. common html
  3. include module

Codepad containing desktop's code: http://codepad.org/hn8QlHQ9

share|improve this question
    
Can you show a working example of this on a codepad or something? There is no good reason why this shouldn't work... I suspect either a mistype or you have forgotten to include the file that defines the function before the point where you can exit –  DaveRandom Jul 11 '12 at 16:45
    
What error do you get? You are including commons.php before you include mod.php, right? Not sure what the arrow diagram at the top of your question means... –  Logan Serman Jul 11 '12 at 16:46
2  
Check your curly braces. You don't have any around the if statements. –  Rocket Hazmat Jul 11 '12 at 16:50
2  
Per update 2: You haven't included the file that contains your function definition by the time you call exit();! –  DaveRandom Jul 11 '12 at 16:53
    
@DaveRandom I do include commons.php before loading the module. As I mentioned, calling myPrint outside that if, works... inside not –  w0rldart Jul 11 '12 at 16:56
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5 Answers

what about workaround like

function my_exit($msg){
   echo $msg;
   exit(1);  //Return code of the script, useful for cli scripts
}

//...
my_exit("Show message");
//...
share|improve this answer
    
I'll give a try asap –  w0rldart Jul 16 '12 at 10:37
add comment

exit() is a language construct capable of only accepting scalar values of type int and string. If you need to print out anything before exiting the script I suggest you do it before exit is called.

....
$error = mysql_error();

if($_ADM['id_user']==1)
    if(!empty($error))
        $debug = array(
                    'message' => "SQL Error in infography_edit module.",
                    'line'    => '79',
                    'error'   => $error,
                    'SQL'     => $SQL
                );
        myPrint($debug);
        exit();
....
share|improve this answer
    
I'm assuming myPrint returns a string. –  Rocket Hazmat Jul 11 '12 at 16:52
    
@Rocket I think there's an awful lot of TL;DR going on here, only in this case it's just DR. –  DaveRandom Jul 11 '12 at 16:55
    
If not simply adding echo or print in front of it will do the work. –  holodoc Jul 11 '12 at 16:55
    
The error refers to 'undefined function'. Changing myPrint function would have no affect. –  tntu Jul 11 '12 at 17:13
add comment

Your code should work assuming that your conditional criteria is being met.

Call to undefined function myPrint()

The above error indicates that the function myPrint() is not defined. You can use the function_exists() function to check if a specific function exits. If it doesn't exist then you could redefine it in the current context.

<?php
if (function_exists('myPrint')) {
    echo "myPrint() exists.\n";
} else {
    echo "myPrint() doesn't exist.\n";
}
?> 
share|improve this answer
    
Please check my update, because usually calling a function inside exit, works for me. –  w0rldart Jul 11 '12 at 16:49
1  
exit() is not capable of executing a function this doesn't make any sense. It can "execute a function" just like any thing else in PHP (except empty), all that matters is that function's return type. –  Rocket Hazmat Jul 11 '12 at 16:51
    
The key point here is that nested functions are executed from the inside out. –  DaveRandom Jul 11 '12 at 16:53
    
Look at my post. It does work. Take my sample and try it. Remember: PHP manual is not always up to date. –  tntu Jul 11 '12 at 16:57
1  
It's not the exit, it's the fact that the function won't execute inside the if for some reason –  w0rldart Jul 11 '12 at 16:58
show 2 more comments

Are you by any chance using namespaces? Are you sure your function is defined? If it is included are you sure you have included it?

P.S. RobB sorry to let you know but it does work.

Example:

$v = 1234;
function xyz($v){
    echo $v . 23;
}
exit( xyz($v) );
share|improve this answer
    
Assuming it returns a string or int then you're correct. –  RobB Jul 11 '12 at 16:55
1  
Namespaces are not a bad shout (arguably first sensible suggestion) –  DaveRandom Jul 11 '12 at 16:56
    
Well if he has the function defined. It cannot be undefined unless he is using namespaces. As far as I know there is no other way for a function to become undefined at some point in the code, unless there's something really wrong somewhere. –  tntu Jul 11 '12 at 17:12
add comment
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Ok, first of all I have to clarify that the code I was working on, wasn't mine, I was just hired to make some improvements and had to talk to the main developer to explain that chaos.

What I kept missing is that every request (every single one that had to do with a page refresh) was going through a secondary file called do.php which eventually loaded the module that I was at, again.

Visual explication:

Currently at          Action                Pre-Processor        Processor 
-------------    =>   ---------------   =>  -------------    =>  ---------
add_users.php         post from form        do.php               add_user.php

Now, just so you know, current module location (http://site.com/module?=add_users) is saved in a session and do.php has a few lines of code to check that session and include back the module if everything ok. I know it's a huge mess, but I can't do nothing about it.

So, eventually I had to go to do.php and add this following line around the beginning of the file: require_once('libs/commons.php');

 

My recommendation

Whenever you see that a function doesn't load, but you know it loads perfectly in certain cases, look for any other file that might interfere as do.php does above, and try including/requiring the file that contains the function.

I know things like those can give headaches, but it is what it is and most of the time is not our fault, but the way the platform was already written.

Good luck to all

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