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This should be a simple question.

Let's say I have an airline and a flight. one airline can have multiple flights. Each flight should be tied to one airline.

How do I create classes to mimic this behavior? What I came up with as follows:

    public class Airline
{
    private string Name;
    private string Description;
    private List<Flight> Flights;
    public Airline(string Name, string Description)
    {
        this.Name = Name;
        this.Description = Description;
    }
    public void AddFlight(Flight Flight)
    {
        if (!this.Flights.Contains(Flight))
        {
            this.Flights.Add(Flight);
        }
    }
    public void RemoveFlight(Flight Flight)
    {
        this.Flights.Remove(Flight);
    }
}

public class Flight
{
    private string No;
    private string Time;
    private Airline Airline;

    public Flight(Airline Airline, string No, string Time)
    {
        this.No = No;
        this.Time = Time;
        this.Airline = Airline;
    }
}

Is there any better approach to do this task? What I don't like is that when I create a flight, I have to add an airline to it and then I have to call Airline.AddFlight in order to associate it with my airline. Also, I'm looking if there's anything else wrong with the code or anything that can be improved.

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1  
is this homeowkr –  DarthVader Jul 11 '12 at 16:53
    
@DarthVader, No, it's not. –  user194076 Jul 11 '12 at 16:53
    
well once u assign the airline, right there you can add that flight to the airlines list of flights. this is simple and fine. why u wanna complicate it. –  DarthVader Jul 11 '12 at 16:54

6 Answers 6

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I think, in this case, it would be to your advantage to have the the Add method on the Airline, and the Flight class as a subclass with a private/protected constructor:

public abstract class Airline
{
  protected List<Flight> _flights = new List<Flight>();

  public abstract Flight AddFlight(string no, string time)
  {
    this._flights.Add(new Flight(this, no, time));
  }

  public class Flight
  {
    protected Flight(Airline airline, string no, string time)
    {
    }
  }
}

In this case, you ask the Airline to create the flight and return the Flight.

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+1. After re-reading your answer it is very close to mine (with inlined factory in your case). –  Alexei Levenkov Jul 11 '12 at 17:25
    
Thanks. Works as expected! –  user194076 Jul 19 '12 at 21:46

Why don't you add the Flight to the Airline upon construction:

    public Flight(Airline Airline, string No, string Time)
    {
        this.No = No;
        this.Time = Time;
        this.Airline = Airline;
        Airline.AddFlight(this);
    }

?

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1  
yeah this is fine. dont try to make it complicated. life is complicated enough already. –  DarthVader Jul 11 '12 at 16:55

One more option that may enforce link is to pass factory method for a flight to Airline's AddFlight method like following and essentially force everyone to construct flights this way.

class Airline{
...
  Flight AddFlight(Func<Airline, Flight> flightFactory)
  {
    var flight = flightFactory(this);
    privateListOfFlights.Add(flight);
    return flight;
  }
}

Usage (function could be shared, not just inline lambda):

myAirline.AddFlight(airline=> new FancyFlight(airline, otherArgs));
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For one thing, you really don't need the reference to airline within flight. A flight shouldn't need to know what airline it is a part of. That association is inherent. Don't create new flights by themselves, just create them using Airline.AddFlight().

So, first thing to do is to change the Flight constructor to take out airline:

public Flight(string No, string Time)
{
    this.No = No;
    this.Time = Time;
}

So, here's an example. You want to create 2 airlines, each with two flights. Heres the code to do so:

Airline airline1 = new Airline("Airline1","First Airline");
airline1.AddFlight(new Flight("1","12:00"));
airline1.AddFlight(new Flight("2","12:00"));

Airline airline2 = new Airline("Airline2","Second Airline");
airline2.AddFlight(new Flight("1","12:00"));
airline2.AddFlight(new Flight("2","12:00"));
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@AlexeiLevenkov Whoops- I copy and pasted his code and removed the airline parameter, but forgot to take out the initialization of it. its fixed now. –  Phillip Schmidt Jul 11 '12 at 17:28
    
+1. Sounds like a good idea in general to not have reference from Flight (if it works for your case). –  Alexei Levenkov Jul 11 '12 at 18:46

This is fine. Except for the circular referencing. You have the Flight class containing an Airline object, and the Airline class containing a List of Flight Objects. Let the Airline Object be the Parent, in your code, you only add flights to the Airline's List of flights when the parent child relationship deems it appropriate. The Flight class needs no knowledge of the Airline class.

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In Windows Forms, Menus use pattern like the following:

class Airline
{
    // code as it was
    public Flight AddFlight(string No, string Time)
    {
        var flight = new Flight(this, No, Time);
        AddFlight(flight);
        return flight;
    }
}

That way you maintain flexibility and don't state the relationship two times.

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