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I am trying to multiply two 32-bit numbers a and b which should give a 64-bit result. With a and b being unsigned 32-bit integers, i came up with this:

r = a * b

r = ((ah << 16) + al) * ((bh << 16) + bl)
  = ((ah * 2^16) + al) * ((bh * 2^16) + bl)
  = (ah * 2^16) * (bh * 2^16) + (ah * 2^16) * bl + al * (bh * 2^16) + al * bl
  = (ah * bh * 2^32) + (ah * bl * 2^16) + (al * bh * 2^16) + (al * bl)
  = ((ah * bh) << 32) + ((ah * bl) << 16) + ((al * bh) << 16) + (al * bl)
  = ((ah * bh) << 32) + ((ah * bl + al * bh) << 16) + (al * bl)

which i then translated to c as follows

static void _mul64(unsigned int a, unsigned int b, unsigned int *hi, unsigned int *lo) {
    unsigned int    ah = (a >> 16), al = a & 0xffff,
                    bh = (b >> 16), bl = b & 0xffff,
                    rh = (ah * bh), rl = (al * bl),

                    rm1  = ah * bl,         rm2  = al * bh,
                    rm1h = rm1 >> 16,       rm2h = rm2 >> 16,
                    rm1l = rm1 & 0xffff,    rm2l = rm2 & 0xffff,
                    rmh  = rm1h + rm2h,     rml  = rm1l + rm2l;

    rl = rl + (rml << 16);
    rh = rh + rmh;
    if(rml & 0xffff0000)
        rh = rh + 1;
    *lo = rl;
    *hi = rh;
}

However when I run this little test which multiplies a = 0xFFFFFFFF with b = 0xFFFFFFFF and should yield 0xFFFFFFFE00000001, I get 0xFFFFFFFD00000001 instead. am I doing wrong?

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    unsigned int a, b, rl, rh;
    unsigned long long r;
    unsigned long long r1, r2, r3;

    a = 0xffffffff;
    b = 0xffffffff;
    mul64(a, b, &rh, &rl);
    r1 = ((unsigned long long) rh << 32) + rl;
    r2 = (unsigned long long) a * b;

    _mul64(a, b, &rh, &rl);
    r3 = ((unsigned long long) rh << 32) + rl;
    printf("a = 0x%08x, b = 0x%08x\n", (unsigned) a, (unsigned) b);
    printf("_mul64: 0x%16llx\n", (unsigned long long) r3);
    printf("a * b = 0x%16llx\n", (unsigned long long) r2);
    return 0;
}
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closed as too localized by Oliver Charlesworth, Mat, bta, abelenky, talonmies Jul 11 '12 at 21:56

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2  
You should print out the values of all the intermediate values, to determine where things go wrong. –  Oliver Charlesworth Jul 11 '12 at 17:44
2  
What @OliCharlesworth said, debugging is an important skill to master. –  TheZ Jul 11 '12 at 17:45
    
Have you thought about what happens when rl = rl + (rml << 16); overflows? Are you detecting/compensating for carry bits in all of the appropriate places? –  Adam Rosenfield Jul 11 '12 at 17:51
    
If there isn't an aspect of learning to this, or if your platform for some reason doesn't support doing it any other way, you can just cast your operands to unsigned long long int and do the multiplication with those. long long is (at least) 64 bit wide in ISO C99 (and gcc apparently also supports it as an extension to C90). gcc.gnu.org/onlinedocs/gcc/Long-Long.html –  sonicwave Jul 11 '12 at 18:05
    
hello sonicwave, i actually need this for javascript which has no native way of doing this. i just wanted to get it working in c first then port it over –  PaulK Jul 11 '12 at 20:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're adding 16-bit quantities here

rm1l = rm1 & 0xffff,    rm2l = rm2 & 0xffff,
rmh  = rm1h + rm2h,     rml  = rm1l + rm2l;

and add rml shifted left by 16 bits to rl,

rl = rl + (rml << 16);

which, when the sum of the two 16-bit quantities becomes a 17-bit quantity discards the carry.

Also, the latter sum may exceed 32 bit range, in which case you lose another carry bit.

share|improve this answer
    
ah you are right! it works now, thank you! :) –  PaulK Jul 11 '12 at 20:02

With all of the arithmetic done in the initializers, debugging is going to be difficult. Move all of those calculations out of the initializers, then compile your code with optimization disabled. Step through it in your debugger and make sure that each step is generating the values that you are expecting it to generate. When you walk through the code while following the algorithm that you solved by hand, it should be easy to spot any place where your code and algorithm deviate.

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that is a good advice thank you –  PaulK Jul 11 '12 at 20:02

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