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My problem in the short version:

I have added the login_required decorator to one of my views. If I enter the URL in the browser which executes this view, the browser correctly redirects to the URL that contains my login form if the user is not authenticated. However, the browser never redirects back to the previous page and I have no idea why this does not work. I have tried hundreds of things.

My problem in the long version:

I have a Django project with a single app, let's call it my_app. All the templates of my project reside in templates/my_app/. I have a template called main.html which contains several forms, among them my login form. With an additional POST parameter called form-type, I check which of the forms has been submitted. The code looks like this:

def process_main_page_forms(request):

    if request.method == 'POST':
        if request.POST['form-type'] == u'login-form':
            template_context = _log_user_in(request)

        elif request.POST['form-type'] == u'registration-form':
            template_context = _register_user(request)

        elif request.POST['form-type'] == u'password-recovery-form':
            template_context = _recover_password(request)

    else:
        template_context = {
            'auth_form': AuthenticationForm(),
            'registration_form': RegistrationForm(),
            'password_recovery_form': EmailBaseForm()
        }

    return render(request, 'my_app/main.html', template_context) 

The function _log_user_in() looks like this:

def _log_user_in(request):

    message = ''
    username = request.POST['username']
    password = request.POST['password']
    user = authenticate(username=username, password=password)

    if user is not None:
        if user.is_active:
            login(request, user)
        else:
            message = 'Your account has been disabled. ' \
                      'Please contact the administrator.'
    else:
        message = 'Your username and password didn\'t match. Please try again.'

    template_context = {
        'auth_form': AuthenticationForm(),
        'registration_form': RegistrationForm(),
        'password_recovery_form': EmailBaseForm(),
        'message': message,
}

    return template_context

I also include the necessary <input> elements in the template, e.g. for the login form this is:

<input type="hidden" name="form-type" value="login-form" />
<input type="hidden" name="next" value="{{ next }}" />

The URL pattern for this view is:

url(r'^$', process_main_page_forms, name='main-page')

My second view renders two forms for changing email address and password for an authenticated user. It looks like this:

@login_required(login_url='/')
def change_user_credentials(request):

    if request.method == 'POST':

        if request.POST['form-type'] == u'change-email-form':
            template_context = _change_email_address(request)

        elif request.POST['form-type'] == u'change-password-form':
            template_context = _change_password(request)

    else:
        template_context = {'change_email_form': ChangeEmailForm()}

    return render(request, 'my_app/user.html', template_context)

The URL pattern for this second view is:

url(r'^account/$', change_user_credentials, name='user-page')

Whenever I access /account/ when I'm not authenticated, I'm successfully redirected to the main page that contains the login form. The resulting URL is http://127.0.0.1:8000/?next=/account/ that contains the necessary next parameter. However, when I log in my account, I'm still on the main page. I never get redirected to the user page, although I provided the necessary next parameter in the login form. It seems that this parameter is always empty, but I don't know why. I also don't have any other redirection calls in my code.

Can you help me solving this problem? Thank you very much in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Side-note: you seem to be using forms in a really odd way; instead of getting username and password directly from request.POST, use request.POST when instantiating a form, i.e. form = AuthenticationForm(request.POST) then test on form.is_valid(). This way you get validation (and some sanitization), and you don't need form-type at all. It'd also solve the current bug in your code whereby the entered username isn't remembered if the password is wrong. –  supervacuo Jul 11 '12 at 19:03
    
See the Working with Forms documentation for more. –  supervacuo Jul 11 '12 at 19:03

1 Answer 1

Possibly a trite answer, but the reason that no redirect is happening is because you don't seem to be doing anything with the next query parameter.

In fact, in the event that a user logs in successfully, you show the same page (albeit with a different context dictionary) as if they attempted to do something else:

def process_main_page_forms(request):
    if request.method == 'POST':
        if request.POST['form-type'] == u'login-form':
            template_context = _log_user_in(request)

        ...
    ...

    return render(request, 'my_app/main.html', template_context) 

As the Django docs explain, it's the contrib.auth.views.login() function that processes the next parameter, and you're not using that view (although you are using the confusingly-identically-named contrib.auth.login function).

You should either just use the included view (which, in addition to processing next, also checks for is_active), or add the redirect functionality to your view, in which case it's probably worth bringing the authentication code into process_main_page_forms() unless you're sure you'll need _log_user_in() elsewhere:

from django.http import HttpResponseRedirect
from django.conf import settings

def process_main_page_forms(request):
    if request.method == 'POST':
        if request.POST['form-type'] == u'login-form':
            username = request.POST['username']
            password = request.POST['password']

            user = authenticate(username=username, password=password)

            if user is not None:
                if user.is_active:
                    login(request, user)
                    if request.GET.get('next', False):
                        return HttpResponseRedirect(request.GET.get('next'))
                    else:
                        return HttpResponseRedirect(settings.LOGIN_REDIRECT_URL)
                else:
                    message = 'Your account has been disabled.'
            else:
                message = 'Your username and password didn\'t match. Please try again.'

            # If we've reached this point then the login failed
            template_context = {
                'auth_form': AuthenticationForm(),
                'registration_form': RegistrationForm(),
                'password_recovery_form': EmailBaseForm(),
                'message': message,
            }
        elif ...:
            # Do things with other form types
    else:

    return render(request, 'my_app/main.html', template_context)

The example usage of contrib.auth.login has the following:

def my_view(request):
    username = request.POST['username']
    password = request.POST['password']
    user = authenticate(username=username, password=password)
    if user is not None:
        if user.is_active:
            login(request, user)
            # Redirect to a success page.
        else:
            # Return a 'disabled account' error message
    else:
        # Return an 'invalid login' error message.

Your code is almost there, but you were missing the "redirect to a success page" part, which is where next would come into play.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you very much for your detailed reply. Indeed, I've messed up the login view and the login function. I have included your proposed HttpResponseRedirect calls in my code in exactly the same way you did it in your example, but it does not have any effect. Do you have any idea why? –  pemistahl Jul 11 '12 at 19:54
    
Just a small addition. I've read about the login view, but as far as I understand, one needs a separate URL pattern for this view to work correctly. However, I have to include all three forms on the same page as mentioned above because this is a requirement by my customer. Any other idea? –  pemistahl Jul 11 '12 at 20:09
    
Puzzling. You could try some of Simon Willison's Django debugging techniques to find out why you're not hitting return statements (which should obviously prevent the rest of your function, including render, from executing. Either print statements or raise will give you an idea of what's going wrong with control flow, but definitely spend a few minutes learning pdb if you need to go deeper into the issue. –  supervacuo Jul 11 '12 at 22:13
    
I can't see a path in my suggested code where a user could be logged in but not redirected. Perhaps you could pastebin your whole views.py file? It's possible an indentation problem is causing an else to be associated with the wrong if or similar. –  supervacuo Jul 11 '12 at 22:16
    
And finally, you can call views from other views — you'd just do from django.contrib.auth.views import login; return login(request) within your view. Even if this weren't possible, an alternative would be to submit the login form to a dedicated URL using (hooked up to auth.views.login) using AJAX. –  supervacuo Jul 11 '12 at 22:19

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