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I have the following enum in Objective-C:

typedef enum {
    APIErrorOne = 1,
    APIErrorTwo,
    APIErrorThree,
    APIErrorFour
} APIErrorCode;

I use the indexes to reference an enum from an xml, for example, xml may have error = 2, which maps to APIErrorTwo

My flow is I get an integer from the xml, and run a switch statement as follows:

int errorCode = 3

switch(errorCode){
    case APIErrorOne:
        //
        break;
    [...]
}

Seems Java dislikes this kind of enum in a switch statement:

enter image description here

In Java it seems you can't assign indexes to enum members. How can I get a Java equivalent of the above ?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

One question per post is the general rule here.

But evolving the JB Nizer answer.

public enum APIErrorCode {

    APIErrorOne(1),
    APIErrorTwo(27),
    APIErrorThree(42),
    APIErrorFour(54);

    private final int code;

    private APIErrorCode(int code) {
        this.code = code;
    }

    public int getCode() {
        return this.code;
    }

    public static APIErrorCode getAPIErrorCodeByCode(int error) {
       if(Util.errorMap.containsKey(error)) {
         return  Util.errorMap.get(error);
       }
       //Or create some default code
       throw new IllegalStateException("Error code not found, code:" + error);
    }

    //We need a inner class because enum are  initialized even before static block
    private static class Util {

        private static final Map<Integer,APIErrorCode> errorMap = new HashMap<Integer,APIErrorCode>();

        static {

            for(APIErrorCode code : APIErrorCode.values()){
                errorMap.put(code.getCode(), code);
            }
        }

    }
}

Then in your code you can write

int errorCode = 3

switch(APIErrorCode.getAPIErrorCodeByCode(errorCode){
    case APIErrorOne:
        //
        break;
    [...]
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks ! Your enum has nothing to do with the previous answer ! Thank you this works. –  Daniel Jul 11 '12 at 18:35
    
Got to say this is crazy how much of an overkill this is for enums in Java, I would almost be better to have a couple of static variables... –  Daniel Jul 11 '12 at 18:38
    
@Daniel, I'm glad that you like the solution. But i would go with JB Nizet solution. Where in switch you call case APIErrorOne.getCode():. The compiler assure that you switch only one type so it is not possible to do int e = 1 switch { case 1: break; case APIErrorCode: braek; }. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Jul 11 '12 at 18:42
    
But that doesn't work, getCode in both your and his examples are instance methods. But I just worked out, I would need to do: case APIResponseErrorType.EMPTY_FIELD.getCode(): ===> Sorry that's my real code. It was very difficult to understand how his solution works but now I can see. So the enum declaration is much shorter then yours... I guess I'll switch back to his. Thanks for the explanation. –  Daniel Jul 11 '12 at 18:53
1  
@Daniel, you are right, i have forgot about that i thought that final will do the job but it should be const and this is not acceptable for enums. So at the end, that extension provided by me is the solution for your problems. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Jul 11 '12 at 19:10

Java enums have a built-in ordinal, which is 0 for the first enum member, 1 for the second, etc.

But enums are classes in Java so you may also assign them a field:

enum APIErrorCode {
    APIErrorOne(1),
    APIErrorTwo(27),
    APIErrorThree(42),
    APIErrorFour(54);

    private int code;

    private APIErrorCode(int code) {
        this.code = code;
    }

    public int getCode() {
        return this.code;
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
Can I set the first error ordinal 1, and leave the others unassigned? Like in Objective-C, will the indexes cascade ? –  Daniel Jul 11 '12 at 18:01
1  
@Daniel, no you can not. If you specify a constructor all enum items must declare it. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Jul 11 '12 at 18:02
1  
No, you can't. Ordinals always start at 0. But you can add a method that returns ordinal() + 1. –  JB Nizet Jul 11 '12 at 18:03
    
How can I use this enum? APIErrorCode(1), APIErrorCode.get(1), APIErrorCode.code(1) ? –  Daniel Jul 11 '12 at 18:04
2  
@JBNizet, I think that encouraging the ordinal to be used by coder is not best advice. The ordinal was used to optimize the EnumSet that was designed to replace the byte mask. –  Damian Leszczyński - Vash Jul 11 '12 at 18:05

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