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This is more of a basic math/programming question. I need to generate a division a/b=c. I will give the user a and b and he has to answer c, but c can only have one decimal. For example, c=5.2 is okay but 5.23 is too much to ask, because the users are children. So I need an algorithm that can generate randomly a division of this kind from all possible combinations where a has to be less than x, b has to be less than y, and c can only have one decimal. Also, a and b have to be integers.

I'm looking for a more elegant solution than trying numbers and checking them until a right combinations is produced. Also, this is for web content, so I'd prefer to do it with javascript, but it can be done in php if necesary. ¿Does some one know how could I do it? I'm not that good at maths.

Thank you very much in advance.

share|improve this question
    
Any other restrictions, like the answer should be greater than 1? Or could 0.3 be acceptable? –  Scott Sauyet Jul 11 '12 at 18:33
    
Yeah, sorry, I forgot to mention that. Operands have to be integers. –  Oscar Abraham Jul 11 '12 at 18:34
2  
It's probably going to be easier to move the equation around a bit and work with c * b = a, provide the program with a random c and b within a bounds and get your a. –  Shaded Jul 11 '12 at 18:34
    
Do you want there to usually be a decimal, or occasionally be a decimal, or always be a decimal? One possible simplistic implementation might have a decimal in three out of four tries. Would that be appropriate? –  Scott Sauyet Jul 11 '12 at 18:41
    
That's what I was thinking. I could get c*b=a, then try all posible decimal numbers, from 0.0 to 0.9 and multiply those with b. Then randomly choose one of the results that give an integer and add that integer to a. The problem with that solution is that it still has to try numbers until a correct one is found. Even if that's better than just trying a lot of combinations until a right one is found, I'd like to know if a more elegant solutino is possible –  Oscar Abraham Jul 11 '12 at 18:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Try generate C as int/10.
Then generate B:

  • just int if (10 * C) % 10 == 0
  • int * 2 if (10 * C) % 5 == 0
  • int * 5 if (10 * C) % 2 == 0
  • int * 10 else

Then A = B * C and it is int

PseudoCode:

tenC = rnd();
if(tenC % 10 == 0) B = rnd();
elseif(tenC % 5 == 0) B = rnd() * 2;
elseif(tenC % 2 == 0) B = rnd() * 5;
else B = rnd() * 10;
C = tenC / 10.0;
A = tenC * B / 10;

where rnd() generates integer as you like

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with that is that a has to be an integer. Thank you anyway. –  Oscar Abraham Jul 11 '12 at 19:47
    
@OscarAbraham, It will be integer, if you will generate it as follows (I hope you understand what is % operator) –  RiaD Jul 11 '12 at 19:48
    
I understand %. I think where I'm having trouble understanding is the int part. Could you explain it to me or put it in code form, please? –  Oscar Abraham Jul 11 '12 at 19:49
    
@OscarAbraham, I added some code –  RiaD Jul 11 '12 at 19:54
    
I understand now! Brilliant! it doesn't consider limits but is so elegant. So .0, .1, .2 and .5 are the only numbers that multiplied by a number that isn't a multiple of them and 10 give an integer. I never thought of that! I think the fifth line would be "else B= tenc*10;" wouldn't it? Can I edit it? –  Oscar Abraham Jul 11 '12 at 20:09

Basically we create a list with all of A * 10's prime factors, and then choose a random combination of factors to create B.

        int[] primes = new int[] { 2, 3, 5, 7, 11, 13, 17, 19, 23, 29, 31, 37, 41, 43, 47, 53, 59, 61, 67, 71, 73, 79, 83, 89, 97, 101, 103, 107, 109, 113, 127, 131, 137, 139, 149, 151, 157, 163, 167, 173, 179, 181, 191, 193, 197, 199, 211, 223, 227, 229, 233, 239, 241, 251, 257, 263, 269, 271, 277, 281, 283, 293, 307, 311, 313, 317, 331, 337, 347, 349, 353, 359, 367, 373, 379, 383, 389, 397, 401, 409, 419, 421, 431, 433, 439, 443, 449, 457, 461, 463, 467, 479, 487, 491, 499, 503, 509, 521, 523, 541, 547, 557, 563, 569, 571, 577, 587, 593, 599, 601, 607, 613, 617, 619, 631, 641, 643, 647, 653, 659, 661, 673, 677, 683, 691, 701, 709, 719, 727, 733, 739, 743, 751, 757, 761, 769, 773, 787, 797, 809, 811, 821, 823, 827, 829, 839, 853, 857, 859, 863, 877, 881, 883, 887, 907, 911, 919, 929, 937, 941, 947, 953, 967, 971, 977, 983, 991, 997 };
        List<int> factors = new List<int>();
        int x = 1000;
        int y = 650;
        Random rand = new Random();
        int a = rand.Next(x);
        int _a = a * 10;
        int currentPrime = 0;

        //find all factors of a * 10
        while (_a > 1)
        {
            while (_a % primes[currentPrime] == 0)
            {
                factors.Add(primes[currentPrime]);
                _a /= primes[currentPrime];
            }
            currentPrime++;
        }

        int b = 1;
        foreach(int factor in factors)
        {
            if (b * factor > y) break;
            if (rand.Next(2) == 0)
            {
                b *= factor;
            }
        }
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, I don't know a lot of c#. What you are doing with x and y is generate a limit for a random number? –  Oscar Abraham Jul 11 '12 at 19:40
    
yes. x is a limit for a and y for b. –  AlexDev Jul 11 '12 at 19:55
    
You say "I don't know if it is mathematically correct", It is definitely correct. You need b that is divisor of 10 * a and you got it. –  RiaD Jul 11 '12 at 19:59
    
No I really said "What you are doing with x and y is generate a limit for a random number?" So I could understand and translate the code to javascript. Any way, I think I kind of understand it, it still has to try numbers to get the correct factors. A more elegant solution has already been posted. But thank you, I really appreciat it. –  Oscar Abraham Jul 11 '12 at 20:15
    
Made it a little shorter, inspired by RiaD's comment. –  AlexDev Jul 11 '12 at 20:28
// Declare variables
var a, b, c, f = 1,
    highestCommonFactor = function(x, y) {
        var i;
        for (i = Math.min(x, y); i > 1; i--) {
            if (x / i == Math.round(x / i) && y / i == Math.round(y / i)) {
                return i;
            }
        }
        return false;
    };

// Pick two random numbers, b and c
// b should be a fairly small integer, i'll choose 5 as an upper limit
// c should be larger than 10 and not end with a 0
b = Math.floor((Math.random() * 5) + 1);
do {
    c = Math.floor(Math.random() * 100);
} while (c.toString().slice(-1) == "0");

// Multiply b by 10
b *= 10;

// Get a value for a
a = (c * b) / 10;

// Divide c by 10
c /= 10;

// Optional - Cancel a and b down to lowest possible integers
/*
while (f !== false) {
    a /= f;
    b /= f;
    f = highestCommonFactor(a, b);
}
//*/

Nothing like a good maths challenge to keep you awake. This code has a tendency to produce a and b where one of them is a multiple of 10, even if you uncomment the Optional - Cancel down to lowest possible integers section (b will always be multiple of 10 if you don't). However I think this is in the nature of what you are doing, since in order for c to have exactly 1 non-zero digit after the decimal point, it must be expressible as int / 10.

Fiddle

share|improve this answer
    
Ha. I know, right? A soulution that doesn't have to try number combinations (even for a highest common factor) has been posted already. Thank you anyway. –  Oscar Abraham Jul 11 '12 at 20:18
function findEquation($maxA, $maxB){
    $x = 2;
    $e = NULL;

    do {
        $a = rand(1, $maxA);
        $b = rand(1, $maxB);
        $e = "$a / $b";
        $y = explode(".", $a/$b);
        if(count($y) > 1){
            $x = strlen($y[1]);
        }else {
            $x = 0;
        }
    } while($x > 1);

    return $e;
}

echo findEquation(100,100);

Better, this will find the first equation that has a decimal value length < 2.

JavaScript solution:

function findEquation(maxA, maxB){
    var x = 2;
    var e = '';
    var a,b,c,d;

    do {
        a = Math.floor(Math.random() * maxA+1);
        b = Math.floor(Math.random() * maxB+1);
        e = a + '/' + b;
        c = (a/b).toString().split(".");
        if(c.length > 1){
            x = c[1].length;
        }else {
            x = 0;
        }
    } while( x > 1 );

    return e;
}

alert(findEquation(100,100));
share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, like I said in the question, I'm looking for a more elgant solution than trying all possible combinations. Thank you, never the less. –  Oscar Abraham Jul 11 '12 at 18:44
    
@OscarAbraham Why not run this once on your machine and then store the combinations you like. Why do you want to do it in real-time? –  Split Your Infinity Jul 11 '12 at 18:47
    
See updated. Also Bart, Oscar prefers it to be done in JavaScript, but I happened to write it in PHP, which he said was a viable solution. –  Marcus Recck Jul 11 '12 at 18:54
    
It could be done in javascript. I know I could do this only once. I already posted in the comments of this question a solution that could do this a little faster because it would only need to do an iteration ten times each time a division is requested instead of a huge iteration at the start and/or a huge array. But I'd like to know if there is a solution that doesn't need to try combinations. I think it could be done with logarithms and all that magic but I forgot all about calculus and I never knew much about it, anyway. –  Oscar Abraham Jul 11 '12 at 19:02
    
I don't see how you would get away without trying combinations. –  Marcus Recck Jul 11 '12 at 19:07

http://jsfiddle.net/eX7fM/2/

var upper = getRandomInt(2, 100);

var lower;
var answer = 0.99; // sentinel

while (!numberHasOneOrNoDecimals(answer)) {
    lower = getRandomInt(1, upper);
    answer = upper / lower;
}

This still involves some looping, but it is a little more elegant than pure brute force and much simpler to understand than a non-looping approach would be (prime factorization and all that jazz is beyond my math skill as well).

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't seem to do what was being asked. –  Scott Sauyet Jul 11 '12 at 18:52
    
Yes, it is a little more elegant, it also leaves software to functions one would have to write, so it's more organized. But like I said in the question comments, I already have a solution that I posted that would only have to loop ten times. I'm looking for a solution that doesn't have to try combinations and select the one or the ones that work. –  Oscar Abraham Jul 11 '12 at 19:33

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