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Should I be passing boost::python::object objects to C++ functions by value or by const reference? I almost always pass around non-trivial objects in C++ via const reference. However, in the Boost Python documentation examples, they always pass boost::python::object by value. So I'm wondering if there's a reasoning behind that or they just did it that way to make the text easier to read or something.

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1 Answer 1

boost::python::object is a trivial object.

Its just a wrapper around a PyObject*, so having a reference to a boost::python::object is basically just carrying around a pointer to a pointer. That's a bit of pointless indirection.

You do avoid incrementing reference counts by passing around the reference. But I'm going to guess that the indirection of using a reference hurts more then incrementing the reference count.

EDIT

I put together a benchmark:

void by_value(boost::python::object o)
{
    o + boost::python::object(1);
}

void by_const_ref(const boost::python::object & o)
{
    o + boost::python::object(1);
}

Results, when compiled with -O3

by-value:       9:215190247
by-const-ref:   5:764022989

Whereas with:

void by_value(boost::python::object o)
{
    for(int x = 0;x < 1000;x++)
    o + boost::python::object(1);
}

void by_const_ref(const boost::python::object & o)
{
    for(int x = 0;x < 1000;x++)
    o + boost::python::object(1);
}

I get:

by-value:       5:199017623
by-const-ref:   8:720536289

@eudoxous is correct, the write required to update the reference count is pretty expensive. However, the indirection caused by using a reference also has a cost. However, it seems smaller then I had anticipated.

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1  
The refcount increment/decretement is a write, whereas reading from (cached) RAM is much less expensive. The pointer has to read anyway, and the pointer value is stored (probably, like with shared_ptr) close to the refcount. So the same logic as for shared_ptr holds here. Pass by const ref, if lifetime of the object is assured. –  eudoxos Jul 11 '12 at 20:13
    
@eudoxos, "the pointer has to [be] read anyway" But with a reference you've got two pointers, not one. You have to read an extra pointer. Added a benchmark which suggests that the extra pointer read is far less expensive then the write, unless you do it a lot more often. –  Winston Ewert Jul 11 '12 at 22:42

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