Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm just starting to get into C++ (I'm an experienced Python/Java developer getting into the better parts of OpenCL) and I'm very confused by how objects are passed into functions.

Let's say I have a simple class:

class Thing {
    int var;
    int var2;
    int var3;

    void doSomething();
};

Now, the "size" of this class is at least 3*sizeof(int) (I'm not sure if a function pointer is stored or not). Now say I have two function signatures:

void doThing1(Thing t);
void doThing2(Thing* t);

When I call doThing1, does it cause the entire instance to be copied onto the stack? When I call doThing2, does it only require sizeof(Thing*) stack space?

A lot of "conventional wisdom" out there on the Internet has been telling me to try to use the function signature of doThing1, but at first glance that seems very silly -- if it does indeed copy the entire object.

I also assume that if a function is going to modify an object that's on the heap (created with the new keyword) it ought to look like doThing1.

Please, correct my ignorance. Either my Google searches aren't being helpful or Google isn't being helpful.

share|improve this question
    
I'l be a bit mean and say that you cannot be an experienced C developer if you're asking this, because the underlying technical details are very similar in C and C++. (Advise on what to use prolly not though.) – Martin Ba Jul 11 '12 at 19:14
    
Instead of passing by value, try passing by reference for larger items. Also prefer passing constant references when possible. Passing by reference allows the compiler to pass only a pointer, while your program can treat the object as if the object was passed by value. – Thomas Matthews Jul 11 '12 at 19:14
up vote 5 down vote accepted

When I call doThing1, does it cause the entire instance to be copied onto the stack? When Ic all doThing2, does it only require sizeof(Thing*) stack space?

Yes and yes.

A lot of "conventional wisdom" out there on the Internet has been telling me to try to use the function signature of doThing1

Where?

If you need to modify Thing in the callee, then you will have to pass a pointer or reference. If you don't need to modify Thing, you should just pass a const reference (giving you the protection from errant state modification of pass by value, with the efficiency of pass by reference).

void doThing(const Thing& t)
share|improve this answer
    
It may be more efficient to pass by value. Yes you have to copy a few more bytes, but if you pass a reference it may have to use an indirect memory access each time to access the referred to value which may be slower... As usual, measure if it matters. – jcoder May 30 '13 at 14:52
    
In addition if you pass a reference the compiler may not be able to optimize the code as well as those values could be modified by accessing another alias of the same variable, whereas that can't happen for pass by value. This of course probably doesn't matter - but don't assume that pass by reference is always more "efficient", it often isn't. – jcoder May 30 '13 at 14:54
    
@jcoder: Thanks. I guess we can say that it's more space efficient (i.e. less stack memory used), but not always more time efficient. – Mud May 30 '13 at 17:03

When I call doThing1, does it cause the entire instance to be copied onto the stack? When I call doThing2, does it only require sizeof(Thing*) stack space?

Yes, and yes.

Now, the "size" of this class is at least 3*sizeof(int) (I'm not sure if a function pointer is stored or not).

No function pointer is stored; the size is 3 × sizeof(int). (Demo)

share|improve this answer

You are correct in both cases. You can also use a reference, which avoids copying but also avoids pointers:

void doThing2(const Thing& t);

This would be my preference, as it is easily optimized by the compiler and helps avoid mistakes (like re-assigning in the function).

share|improve this answer
3  
It should be a const reference in this case (where a copy would also work). – Chad Jul 11 '12 at 19:14

pass them by const reference void doThing1( const Thing &t)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.