Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Results

Using a list of 10 million random ints (same seed each time, average of 10 repetitions):

listCopy.Sort(Comparer<int>.Default) takes 314ms.

Using

sealed class IntComparer : IComparer<int>
{
  public int Compare(int x, int y)
  {
    return x < y ? -1 : (x == y ? 0 : 1);
  }
}

listCopy.Sort(new IntComparer()) takes 716ms.

Some variations:

  • Using struct IntComparer instead of sealed class: 771ms
  • Using public int Compare(int x, int y) { return x.CompareTo(y); }: 809ms

Comments

Comparer<int>.Default returns a GenericComparer<int>. According to dotPeek, we have:

internal class GenericComparer<T> : Comparer<T> where T : IComparable<T>
{
  public override int Compare(T x, T y)
  {
    if ((object) x != null)
    {
      if ((object) y != null)
        return x.CompareTo(y);
      else
        return 1;
    }
    else
      return (object) y != null ? -1 : 0;
  }

...
}

Obviously, this shouldn't be faster than my IntComparer variant using CompareTo.

I didn't find anything relevant in ArraySortHelper<T>, which appears to be the core of List<T>.Sort.

I can only guess that the JIT does some magic special-casing here (Replace sorts which use Comparer<int>.Default by a specialized sorting implementation which doesn't do any IComparer<T>.Compare calls, or something similar)?

EDIT: The timings above are too low by a factor of 5.9214729782462845 (Stopwatch and TimeSpan have a different definition of "Tick"). Doesn't affect the point, though.

share|improve this question
7  
Can we see the code that indicates how you actually timed it? A lot of "Why is X faster than Y?" questions have issues with how they were timed in the first place. –  vcsjones Jul 11 '12 at 19:30
4  
Also, if you change your IntComparer to return x - y how does that affect runtime? –  Cameron Jul 11 '12 at 19:31
1  
@DarthVader He is saying that the one that is doing the null check and using the default comparer is faster than his custom IntComparer. –  vcsjones Jul 11 '12 at 19:38
2  
Try running them in a different order, see if you get the same results –  Paul Phillips Jul 11 '12 at 19:40
2  
@Cameron returning x - y is not a good idea. You end up with overlow problems fairly easily; consider x = int.MinValue and y = int.MaxValue. You would end up returning a positive value instead of a negative value. –  Monroe Thomas Jul 11 '12 at 19:51

3 Answers 3

up vote 13 down vote accepted

The reason is readily visible in the Reference Source, dd/ndp/clr/src/bcl/system/array.cs source code file:

   [ReliabilityContract(Consistency.MayCorruptInstance, Cer.MayFail)]
   public static void Sort<T>(T[] array, int index, int length, System.Collections.Generic.IComprer<T> comparer) {
       if (array==null)
           throw new ArgumentNullException("array");
       if (index < 0 || length < 0)
           throw new ArgumentOutOfRangeException((length<0 ? "length" : "index"), Environment.GeResourceString("ArgumentOutOfRange_NeedNonNegNum"));
       if (array.Length - index < length)
           throw new ArgumentException(Environment.GetResourceString("Argument_InvalidOffLen"));

       Contract.EndContractBlock();

       if (length > 1) {
           // <STRIP>
           // TrySZSort is still faster than the generic implementation.
           // The reason is Int32.CompareTo is still expensive than just using "<" or ">".
           // </STRIP>
           if ( comparer == null || comparer == Comparer<T>.Default ) {
               if(TrySZSort(array, null, index, index + length - 1)) {
                   return;
               }
           }

           ArraySortHelper<T>.Default.Sort(array, index, length, comparer);
       }
   }

The comment marked by <STRIP> explains it. The code path for the default comparer goes through TrySZSort(), a function that's implemented in the CLR and written in C++. You can get its source code from SSCLI20, it is implemented in clr/src/vm/comarrayhelpers.cpp. It uses a template class method named ArrayHelpers<T>::QuickSort().

It gets the speed advantage from being able to use the < operator, a single cpu instruction instead of the 10 required by Int32.CompareTo(). Or in other words, IComparable<>.CompareTo is over-specified for simple sorting.

share|improve this answer
    
I feel stupid now. I actually skimmed over that method in dotPeek (not the reference source); that last if ( comparer == null ... is tucked away in a single line there and I read over it as just another input validation line :) –  FunctorSalad Jul 11 '12 at 20:34
    
Yes, common problem with disassemblers. Use the source Luke! The comments are an important value-add. –  Hans Passant Jul 11 '12 at 20:38

ILSpy decompiles thus:

    public override int Compare(T x, T y)
    {
        if (x != null)
        {
            if (y != null)
            {
                return x.CompareTo(y);
            }
            return 1;
        }
        else
        {
            if (y != null)
            {
                return -1;
            }
            return 0;
        }
    }

The null checks will always evaluate as true for a value type, so they will be optimized away; the end result will be

public override int Compare(T x, T y)
{
    return x.CompareTo(y);
}
share|improve this answer
    
That doesn't seem to explain why the Comparer<int>.Default is faster. –  FunctorSalad Jul 11 '12 at 20:10
    
@FunctorSalad I just timed x.CompareTo(y); vs x < y ? -1 : (x == y ? 0 : 1);. CompareTo is about twice as fast on average in release mode. Since Comparer<int>.Default will optimize to x.CompareTo(y);, that is why it is about twice as fast as your custom comparer. Change your custom comparer to use x.CompareTo(y); and you should see equivalent performance. –  Monroe Thomas Jul 11 '12 at 20:16
    
@FunctorSalad Try replacing your IntComparer implementation with this one, see if the difference disappears. –  Paul Phillips Jul 11 '12 at 20:18
    
@FunctorSalad you're right; I posted that answer knowing that it was incomplete, because I didn't have time to look into it more fully. I also want to call attention to the guess in your question ("I can only guess that the JIT does some magic special-casing here (Replace sorts which use Comparer<int>.Default by a specialized sorting implementation which doesn't do any IComparer<T>.Compare calls, or something similar)?"), which is obviously correct, except for the fact that the special casing is done in the BCL, not by the JIT. –  phoog Jul 11 '12 at 23:14

The default comparer for Int32 is the CompareTo(int,int) method. Your assumption of the default comparer is incorrect.

The IComparable interface provides a strongly typed comparison method for ordering members of a generic collection object. Because of this, it is usually not called directly from developer code. Instead, it is called automatically by methods such as List.Sort() and Add.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/4d7sx9hd.aspx. The IComparable interface mentioned defines the CompareTo method.

So we should expect your comparer to be about the same speed. So why might it be slower? If we dig down into the Sort method in .Net, we eventually get to this line:

if ((length > 1) && (((comparer != null) && (comparer != Comparer<T>.Default)) || !TrySZSort(array, null, index, (index + length) - 1)))
{
    ArraySortHelper<T>.Default.Sort(array, index, length, comparer);
}

If the comparer equals the default comparer for that type, the Array Sort will try to use an internal optimized sort method. Your comparer is not the default comparer, so it skips that optimized sort.

share|improve this answer
    
Sorry, your edit is the correct answer, but I chose Hans Passant's answer because it was slightly earlier than the edit. Regarding your first point, I don't see my mistake here, as I concluded that Comparer<int>.Default is a GenericComparer<T>, which calls the CompareTo method from ICompareble<T>. –  FunctorSalad Jul 11 '12 at 21:08
    
That's fine, he posted while I was working on that edit, but didn't see his until after I saved my edit. His answer explains it well (I upvoted it too). I will add something to my post regarding the first point to explain better. –  hatchet Jul 11 '12 at 21:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.