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I wrote the following code in order to make an echo server (data I write to stdout moves from my PC to server and back to my PC). In the code I set the SO_LINGER option in the socket. So when I pressed Ctrl+C which caused client.cpp to send a FIN to server.cpp, the client.cpp's close() should wait for 10s for server.cpp's socket to send back a FIN.

But what i found was that client.cpp immediately finished execution and exited after Ctrl+C was pressed and even the close() funcion didn't return -1 which it should have if the other side doesn't send FIN before the time mentioned in l_linger expires (I am sure that the server didn't send a FIN or it must have been listed in tcpdump.) The server side didn't send a FIN unless I pressed Ctrl+C on its terminal. The tcpdump until I pressed Ctrl+C on the server's terminal is shown in the screenshot:

The highlighted lines above are client's FIN.

client.cpp:

int main()
{
    int clifd;
    clifd=socket(AF_INET,SOCK_STREAM, IPPROTO_TCP);
    sockaddr_in serv;
    bzero(&serv, sizeof(serv));
    serv.sin_family=AF_INET;
    serv.sin_port=htons(3345);
    inet_aton("127.0.0.1", &(serv.sin_addr));

    linger lin;
    unsigned int y=sizeof(lin);
    lin.l_onoff=1;
    lin.l_linger=10;
    setsockopt(clifd,SOL_SOCKET, SO_LINGER,(void*)(&lin), y);  

    connect(clifd, (sockaddr*)(&serv), sizeof(serv));
    int n,m;
    char data[100];
    char recvd[100];
    for(;;)
    {
        fgets(data, 100,stdin );
        n=strlen(data);
        cout<<"You have written "<<n<<endl;

        if(n>0)
        {
            while(n>0)
            {  
                m=write(clifd,data,n);
                n=n-m;
            }
        }

        n=read(clifd, recvd, 100);
        cout<<"Server echoed back "<<n<<endl; 

        if(n>0)
        {
            while(n>0)
            {
                m=fputs(data,stdout);  
                cout<<"m is"<<m<<endl; 
                fflush(stdout);
                n=n-m;
            }
            //cout<<data<<endl;
        }
    }
    int z=close(clifd);
    if(z==-1)
        cout<<"close returned -1 "<<endl; ***//this doesn't get printed***
}

server.cpp:

void reflect(int x)
{
    int n;
    int m;
    char data[100];
    cout<<"Entered reflect function"<<endl; 

    for(;;)
    {
        n=read(x,data, 100); 
        cout<<"Client sent "<<n<<endl; 

        if(n>0)
        {
            while(n>0)
            {
                m=write(x,data,n);
                n=n-m;
            }
            cout<<"Successfully echoed back to client"<<endl;  
        }
    }//end of for loop
}

int main()
{
    sockaddr_in serv;
    bzero(&serv, sizeof(serv));
    serv.sin_family=AF_INET;
    serv.sin_port=htons(3345);
    inet_aton("127.0.0.1", &(serv.sin_addr));

    int servfd=socket(AF_INET, SOCK_STREAM, IPPROTO_TCP);
    int x;
    x=bind(servfd, (sockaddr*)(&serv), sizeof(serv));

    cout<<"Bind returned"<<x<<endl; //this displays x as 0

    listen(servfd, 5);
    sockaddr cli;
    int connfd;
    pid_t id=-1;
    socklen_t siz=sizeof(cli);
    for(;;)
    {
        if((connfd=accept(servfd, &cli, &siz))>=0)
            id=fork();

        if(id==0)
            reflect(connfd);
        else 
            continue;
    }
}

Why is client's close() not waiting?

share|improve this question
1  
Why do you assume Ctrl+C won't just terminate your application (and hence not give it the opportunity to see the socket being closed)? You don't catch SIGINT in your client app, and the FIN that you see is likely due to the socket being forcefully closed by your application "going away". –  Chad Jul 11 '12 at 19:35

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

So, the client.cpp 's close() should wait for 10s for server.cpp 's socket to send back a FIN.

That's not correct. It should wait for all the outgoing data and the outgoing FIN to be acknowledged, or maybe even just sent, or for the timer to expire. There is no statement anywhere that entitles you to expect it to wait for an incoming FIN.

share|improve this answer

Why is client's close() not waiting?

You are not calling close() in your client. The for loop that immediately precedes your close() call never exits, therefore the close() can never occur.

Typing CTRL-C in your console causes the program to exit immediately, without performing any of the remaining actions.

Since close() is never invoked, the rest of your question (should close() wait? should I use closesocket()? etc) is moot.

If you do want to be able to exit the for(;;) loop, try something like this:

for(;;)
{
  if(fgets(data, 100,stdin ) == NULL)
    break;
  ... rest of loop goes here ...

Then, when you run your client program, do not terminate it with CTRL-C, but rather type CTRL-D as the only character on the line.

share|improve this answer
1  
You could show the OP how to make this close call happen, using signal.h, and some state flags. –  Chad Jul 11 '12 at 19:41

To expand on an answer above, if you want to get your close() function called, make these relatively simple changes to your client:

#include <signal.h>

volatile bool stop_now = false;

// This function will be called when SIGINT (Ctrl+C)
// is received, and will set this global flag that
// will terminate your loop below.
void app_stopped(int sig)
{
    stop_now = true;
}


int main()
{
   // setup to catch Ctrl+C
   signal(SIGINT, app_stopped);

   ...

   // for(;;)
   // becomes:
   while(!stop_now)
   {
      ...
   }
   ...
}

Now, when you send a SIGINT (via Ctrl+C or via kill -s INT) your program will stop gracefully and your close() function will be called. You can start troubleshooting from there.

share|improve this answer
    
+1, but you probably want the bool stop_now to be volatile bool stop_now? –  Mike Jul 11 '12 at 20:00
    
Excellent point. –  Chad Jul 11 '12 at 20:21

From the linger reference on MSDN (if you don't trust msdn, you can find the same information here)

The linger structure maintains information about a specific socket that specifies how that socket should behave when data is queued to be sent and the closesocket function is called on the socket.

So it will wait until all data has been sent, not until a FIN has been received.

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