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I have a class for something simple, Status, and it contains two properties. I want to use an Enum for one of the Properties(StatusID) so that I can eliminate a bunch of Magic Strings.

My question is how I then work with it, for example: I have a Method that returns a List for binding in a dropdown box that looks like this -->

public static IList<Status> GetAdminStatuses()
{
  IQueryable<Status> stat=context.tblAdminStatus
       .Where(s => s.InactiveDate > DateTime.Now || s.InactiveDate == null)
       .Select(s => new Status()
       {
         StatusID=s.StatusID,
         StatusDescription=s.StatusDesc
       });
   return stat.ToList();
}

It obviously does not like my StatusID=s.StatusID part as the DB stores it as a varchar. Am I missing something simple here or have I stumbled into noob territory and should not be doing it this way?

For reference here is the Class and Enum:

public class Status
{
  public string StatusID {get; set;}
  public string StatusDescription {get; set;}
}

public enum MyStatusID
{
  draft, pending, declined, accepted, close 
}

EDIT

So taking the advice here I was able to get my method to compile however at runtime I get the following --> Method 'System.Object Parse(System.Type, System.String)' has no supported translation to SQL.

Thoughts?


EDIT - Method in it's entirety by request, thanks (NOTE that NoaStatusID == MyStatusID)

   public static IList<Status> GetAdminStatuses(NoaStatusID currentStatus = NoaStatusID.draft)
    {
        using (var context = MemberDataContext.Create())
        {
            IQueryable<Status> stat=context.tblAdminStatus
                   .Where(s => s.InactiveDate > DateTime.Now || s.InactiveDate == null)
                   .Select(s => new Status()
                     {
                       StatusID=NoaStatusID)Enum.Parse(typeof(NoaStatusID),s.StatusID),
                       StatusDescription=s.StatusDesc
                     });

            switch (currentStatus)
            {
                case NoaStatusID.draft:
                    stat=stat.Where(s => (s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.draft || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.pending));                                                     
                    break;
                case NoaStatusID.pending:
                    stat = stat.Where(s => (s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.accepted || s.StatusID ==NoaStatusID.declined || s.StatusID ==NoaStatusID.pending));
                    break;                        
                case NoaStatusID.declined:
                    stat = stat.Where(s => (s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.draft || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.pending || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.declined));
                    break;
                case NoaStatusID.accepted:
                    stat = stat.Where(s => (s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.mailed || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.monitor || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.close || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.accepted));
                    break;
                case NoaStatusID.mailed:
                    stat = stat.Where(s => (s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.mailed || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.monitor || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.close || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.appeal));
                    break;
                case NoaStatusID.monitor:
                case NoaStatusID.appeal:
                case NoaStatusID.close:
                    stat = stat.Where(s => (s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.close || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.appeal));   
                    break;                    
            }


            return stat.ToList();
        }
    }
share|improve this question
2  
Where are you using the MyStatusID enum? Isn't your StatusID property still a string? –  NominSim Jul 11 '12 at 19:56
    
I want to Replace the string StatusId with enum MyStatusID so to keep my Magic Strings in one spot. The values of the enum match the possible DB choices for StatusID. –  Refracted Paladin Jul 11 '12 at 19:58
    
Do you want a descriptive text or are you fine with the string representation of the enum value? despite all of that, the DB choice for StatusID should be an int. varchar and int are perfectly interchangable, you could store a converted int value for example. –  Mare Infinitus Jul 11 '12 at 20:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

i believe what you're searching for is:

StatusID = (MyStatusID)Enum.Parse(typeof(MyStatusID), s.StatusID),

in .Net 4.0 there is also a Enum.TryParse(string, out enum) but that is not so useful inside your .Select()

Alternatively: albeit less efficient in most cases, you can keep the Status.StatusID as a string and add a readonly property StatusEnum that outputs the Enum value on the fly:

public MyStatusID StatusEnum {
    get {
        return (MyStatusID)Enum.Parse(typeof(MyStatusID), StatusID)
    }

    private set;
}

in .Net 4.0:
public MyStatusID StatusEnum {
    get {
        MyStatusID value;
        if(!Enum.TryParse(StatusID, out value)
          value = MyStatusID.Default; // default value, instead of Exception throwing

        return value;
    }

    private set;
}

this alternative re-parses the value everytime instance.StatusEnum is read, so I don't recommend it unless LINQ hates the first approach


Responding to your last EDIT:

The Enum.Parse() is translating to SQL fine in your example. The problem is in the switch statement where you're adding on a .Where() clause that has a comparison with an Enum. LINQ doesn't know how to turn an Enum == Enum into SQL but it does know to do it with C# objects. So the easiest solution is to ToList() them and do the comparison locally. Unfortunately, that means it's downloading rows of -all- Status types from the database and then filters them locally. If you have millions of records this may not be reasonable:

   public static IList<Status> GetAdminStatuses(NoaStatusID currentStatus = NoaStatusID.draft)
    {
        using (var context = MemberDataContext.Create())
        {
            List<Status> stat=context.tblAdminStatus
                   .Where(s => s.InactiveDate > DateTime.Now || s.InactiveDate == null)
                   .Select(s => new Status()
                     {
                       StatusID=NoaStatusID)Enum.Parse(typeof(NoaStatusID),s.StatusID),
                       StatusDescription=s.StatusDesc
                     })
                   .ToList();

            switch (currentStatus)
            {
                case NoaStatusID.draft:
                    stat=stat.Where(s => (s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.draft || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.pending)).ToList();                                                     
                    break;
                case NoaStatusID.pending:
                    stat = stat.Where(s => (s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.accepted || s.StatusID ==NoaStatusID.declined || s.StatusID ==NoaStatusID.pending)).ToList();
                    break;                        
                case NoaStatusID.declined:
                    stat = stat.Where(s => (s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.draft || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.pending || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.declined)).ToList();
                    break;
                case NoaStatusID.accepted:
                    stat = stat.Where(s => (s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.mailed || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.monitor || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.close || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.accepted)).ToList();
                    break;
                case NoaStatusID.mailed:
                    stat = stat.Where(s => (s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.mailed || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.monitor || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.close || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.appeal)).ToList();
                    break;
                case NoaStatusID.monitor:
                case NoaStatusID.appeal:
                case NoaStatusID.close:
                    stat = stat.Where(s => (s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.close || s.StatusID == NoaStatusID.appeal)).ToList();   
                    break;                    
            }


            return stat;
        }
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Your first approach seems to work. Thanks very much, I will see what I can do about getting that column switched to an int but I am glad to have found a way to make it work anyway. –  Refracted Paladin Jul 12 '12 at 13:10
    
See my Edit, does this mean I have to use your 2nd approach? –  Refracted Paladin Jul 12 '12 at 14:32
    
can you post your code under the edit. I just attempted it myself locally and do not get the System.NotSupportedException exception - works fine for me. Using .Net4.0 –  arserbin3 Jul 12 '12 at 14:57
    
Done, thank you so much for all your help! –  Refracted Paladin Jul 12 '12 at 15:03

Isn't what you are looking for?

 Colors colorValue = (Colors) Enum.Parse(typeof(Colors), colorString);
share|improve this answer
    
If I would have been paying attention this is works as well and is the same as a couple of the other answers. THanks –  Refracted Paladin Jul 12 '12 at 13:11

If you make the backing field* an int, it will work just fine.

In fact you can even use byte enums (with a smallint backing field).

There is a problem with the designer however. IIRC, the enum declaration needs to be in the same namespace.

Note: By backing field, I mean the database table column type.

share|improve this answer
    
what if the enum is literally a string representation of what I want. e.g. MyStatusID.draft == "draft" or are you saying I'd be better off switching my DB ID column to int then in this instance? –  Refracted Paladin Jul 11 '12 at 20:00
    
That will not work AFAIK. Is there any reason why it should not be a 'normalized' item? –  leppie Jul 11 '12 at 20:00
    
sorry for the denseness but how do you mean 'normalized'? With an int backing it or some other way? –  Refracted Paladin Jul 11 '12 at 20:01
    
Normalized as in SQL terms, TABLE Status (Id int PK, Name varchar(max)). –  leppie Jul 11 '12 at 20:02
    
I can look into it. It may be possible, I don't control DB setup so...:) –  Refracted Paladin Jul 11 '12 at 20:06

My guess is that you want the String equivalent of the enum value, but it isn't very clear:

public static IList<Status> GetAdminStatuses()
{
  IQueryable<Status> stat=context.tblAdminStatus
       .Where(s => s.InactiveDate > DateTime.Now || s.InactiveDate == null)
       .Select(s => new Status()
       {
         StatusID=Enum.GetName(typeof(MyStatusID),s.StatusID),
         StatusDescription=s.StatusDesc
       });
}

EDIT: Given the comments, sounds like you want:

public static IList<Status> GetAdminStatuses()
{
  IQueryable<Status> stat=context.tblAdminStatus
       .Where(s => s.InactiveDate > DateTime.Now || s.InactiveDate == null)
       .Select(s => new Status()
       {
         StatusID=(MyStatusID)s.StatusID,
         StatusDescription=s.StatusDesc
       });
}

EDIT: Given the (further) comments, sounds like you want:

public static IList<Status> GetAdminStatuses()
{
  IQueryable<Status> stat=context.tblAdminStatus
       .Where(s => s.InactiveDate > DateTime.Now || s.InactiveDate == null)
       .Select(s => new Status()
       {
         // If database is storing 'draft' (as a varchar)
         StatusID=Enum.Parse(typeof(MyStatusID), s.StatusID),
         StatusDescription=s.StatusDesc
       });
}

Or maybe

public static IList<Status> GetAdminStatuses()
{
  IQueryable<Status> stat=context.tblAdminStatus
       .Where(s => s.InactiveDate > DateTime.Now || s.InactiveDate == null)
       .Select(s => new Status()
       {
         // If database is storing '0' (as a varchar)
         StatusID=(MyStatusID)int.Parse(s.StatusID),
         StatusDescription=s.StatusDesc
       });
}
share|improve this answer
    
And this will not blow up under LINQ2SQL? –  leppie Jul 11 '12 at 20:03
1  
Eh, yeah probably would. Interesting to try though. –  Chris Shain Jul 11 '12 at 20:04
    
It is interesting but for me error stating an instance of string cannot be assigned to a member of type MyStatusID –  Refracted Paladin Jul 11 '12 at 20:05
    
Did you change the signature of the StatusID property on the class Status? Your question shows it as a String. –  Chris Shain Jul 11 '12 at 20:07
    
Yeah I did, I was trying to show how it was before I changed it. –  Refracted Paladin Jul 11 '12 at 20:08

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