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Whenever I define a variable and give it a value at the same time inside a class, I get an error. What is the reason for this?

As you can see, this doesn't work...

class myClass {
    private:
        int x = 4; // error
};

But when I keep the variable undefined it does:

class myClass {
    private:
        int x;
};
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What is the error? Are you initializing the variable in the .h pr .cpp file? –  Chris Dargis Jul 11 '12 at 20:21
    
@DougRamsey In a .cpp file. –  0x499602D2 Jul 11 '12 at 20:22

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Since no one else is using member initialization, I'll introduce you:

class myClass {
    private:
        int x;
    public:
        myClass() : x (4){}
};

It's always better to use this over assigning in the body of the constructor, since by the time the body begins, all user-defined members will have already been initialized whether you said so or not. Better to do it once and actually initialize the non-user-defined members, and it is the only method that works for both non-static const members, and reference members.

For example, the following will not work because x isn't being initialized in the body, it's being assigned to:

class myClass {
    private:
        const int x;
    public:
        myClass() {x = 4;}
};

Using a member initializer, however, will, because you're initializing it off the bat:

class myClass {
    private:
        const int x;
    public:
        myClass() : x (4){}
};

Note also that your int x = 4; syntax is perfectly valid in C++11, where it subs in for any needed initialization, so you'll benefit if you start using it.

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Initialize your variables in the constructor.

class myClass {
private:
    int x;

public:
   myClass()
   {
       x = 4; // hope that it will work
   }
};

Updated Answer: According to chris, it is better to use member initialization

class myClass {
private:
    const int x;
public:
    myClass() : x (4){}
};
share|improve this answer
3  
I'd change that to actual initialization (via a member initializer), not assignment. Other than that slightly pedantic point, it's the right answer for C++03. –  chris Jul 11 '12 at 20:25
    
@chris after seeing you answer, now I understand your point. –  Waqar Janjua Jul 11 '12 at 20:41
    
Yours is still correct, and was put up long before mine. I'll still upvote it if you make that correction. The member initializers are only good, and save space in the body, too. –  chris Jul 11 '12 at 20:47
    
@chris Your answer is the best, I'm not a C++ developer, I just post the answer bcz I know Constructors are used for the initialization. On your suggestion I'm editing my answer bcz i'm sure you are right. Thanks for the info –  Waqar Janjua Jul 11 '12 at 20:51
    
yeah, but now I replace it with the right. –  Waqar Janjua Jul 11 '12 at 20:56

Instance variable are supposed to be defined using setter methods, IE: setX(input) or inside a constructor.

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Do this insted:

class myClass
{
private:
    static const int x = 4;
};

If you don't x to be either static or constant, use only int x; instead and initialize x in the constructor of the class.

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Your class is like a blue print. It does not have any storage associated with it. When you instantiate an object of your class, that is akin to the building based on that blue print. Your object has storage and that can hold the value you give to the member variables.

Also, as others have pointed out, it is possible to do what you want in C++11. Check out: http://www.open-std.org/JTC1/SC22/WG21/docs/papers/2008/n2756.htm

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In C++03,

only static const integral data members can be initialized within a class.

Either initialize in the constructor, or make the data member static const:

class myClass {
    private:
        int x;
    public:
      myClass() {
        x = 4;
      }
};

or

class myClass {
    private:
     static const int x = 4;
};
share|improve this answer

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