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I'm trying to work with Raphael for some SVG stuff and tried, well, with my limited knowledge, to build something beautiful ;) I have 3 files: 1x html file and 2xjs files html file: with an onload function ( + header,body and stuff)

window.onload=function()
{
    init();
}

js File1: has the init function and a function to load js files (e.g. Raphael) and a callback to proceed after the file is loaded

function init()
{
    getScripts(initTool)
}

function getScripts(callback)
{ 
    $.when($.getScript(scripts[raphael]).then(callback) 
} 

function initTool()
{
    $('body').append("<div id='tool'></div>");
    tool=Raphael("tool",5000,5000);
    $('body').append("<a href='javascript:void(0)' onclick='newElement'>New element</a>")
}

js File2: Here I have the function newElement which should add (for this example) a single path to the svg element created by Rapahel

function newElement()
{
    tool.path("M10,20L30,40");
}

Unfortunately the path does not show up and I have no idea why. I tried referencing the "tool" variable before the onload in case it it related to global/local variables (wild guessing) but this also does not work. changing id's to "tool" to "tool2" for the svg element also does not work.

What else could it be? Where is my (possibly obvious) blind spot?

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3 Answers 3

SHould callback not be declared as a parameter here?

function getScripts(callback)
{ 
    $.when($.getScript(scripts[raphael]).then(callback) 
} 
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Sorry, getScripts() is getScripts(callback) indeed. I forgot when trying to minimize the code for the question. I will edit the original question right away. Thx! –  user1408275 Jul 11 '12 at 21:07

To be honest with you I've written quite a bit of javascript and I don't quite grok variables scopes fully yet. However, when calling functions you should use parenthesis to indicate that it should be executed (there are a couple of times when you reference them without parenthesis, but that is beyond the scope of this answer).

So...

$('body').append("<a href='javascript:void(0)' onclick='newElement()'>New element</a>")

But this isn't enough to make it work, you should also declare your function like this:

var newElement = function() {
    tool.path("M10,20L30,40");
}

Here is a working solution: http://jsfiddle.net/vAjG2/

(perhaps somebody can expand on why these changes are needed, I don't grasp them myself).

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Nice, it works! Thank you very much. But I have no clue why it is different to the previous implementation. Would be great if someone could explain, since otherwise I have to ask again when running in the same problem and not beeing aware of ;) –  user1408275 Jul 12 '12 at 5:02

The problem has nothing to do with variable scope. You just need parentheses following the function name in your inline event handler. Rewrite the last line as:

$('body').append("<a href='javascript:void(0)' onclick="newElement()">New element</a>")

and you'll be up and running.

However, inline event handlers are frowned upon for a whole variety of reasons. As quirksmode says: "Although the inline event registration model is ancient and reliable, it has one serious drawback. It requires you to write JavaScript behavior code in your XHTML structure layer, where it doesn't belong."

A much cleaner way to do this would separate out the markup and the script, e.g.:

<div id='tool'></div>
<a id="mylink" href='#'>New element</a>

<script>
var tool = Raphael("tool",500,500);

$('#mylink').on("click", function() {
    tool.path("M10,20L30,40");
});
</script>

See this jsfiddle for this code in action.

Lastly, as a helpful hint, I would advise running your code on document ready, instead of window load, especially you're using jquery,. Document ready happens when the DOM is first constructed. Window load waits for all assets to be fully loaded, which can take awhile, and typically isn't necessary. It's long considered a best practice.

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