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Four men have to cross a bridge at night.Any party who crosses, either one or two men, must carry the flashlight with them. The flashlight must be walked back and forth; it cannot be thrown, etc. Each man walks at a different speed. One takes 1 minute to cross, another 2 minutes, another 5, and the last 10 minutes. If two men cross together, they must walk at the slower man's pace. There are no tricks--the men all start on the same side, the flashlight cannot shine a long distance, no one can be carried, etc.

And the question is What's the fastest they can all get across. I am basically looking for some generalized approach to these kind of problem. I was told by my friend, that this can be solved by Fibonacci series, but the solution does not work for all.

Please note this is not a home work.

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1  
Is this homew... oh. –  skaffman Jul 17 '09 at 16:03
1  
Kyahaha, I was asked this during an interview, but it was constrained further by saying it was at night, very dark and the flashlight battery can only last 17 minutes. –  Jimmy Chandra Jul 17 '09 at 16:10
2  
@ Jimmy Chandra - doesn't that give away the answer? –  Matthew Jones Jul 17 '09 at 16:11
1  
I had an interview like that once. They provided a ride and for part of the way I had to wear a blindfold. –  Smandoli Jul 17 '09 at 16:13
6  
When does the wolf attack the sheep? (xkcd.com/589) –  Nathan Koop Jul 17 '09 at 16:18

7 Answers 7

up vote 15 down vote accepted

There is an entire PDF that solves the general case of this problem (in a formal proof).

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1  
Thats a very good reference Matthew. Thanks +1 –  Ganesh M Jul 17 '09 at 16:22

17 minutes - this is a classic MS question.

1,2 => 2 minutes passed.
1 retuns => 3 minutes passed.
5,10 => 13 minutes passed.
2 returns => 15 minutes passed.
1,2 => 17 minute passed.

In general the largest problem / slowest people should always be put together, and sufficient trips of the fastest made to be able to bring the light back each time without using a slow resource.

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Seems your generalized solution works for other input as well .. +1 –  Ganesh M Jul 17 '09 at 16:21
2  
I don't think he is looking for 17. More like he is looking about the algo to solve this problem. –  Jimmy Chandra Jul 17 '09 at 16:25

I would solve this problem by placing a fake job ad on Dice.com, and then asking this question in the interviews until someone gets it right.

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1  
I think this was the fastest down-vote I've ever gotten. Awesome! –  MusiGenesis Jul 17 '09 at 16:10
1  
+1. O(n) complexity (with n the number of interviews, not the number of bridge crossers, unfortunately ;)) –  Stephan202 Jul 17 '09 at 16:18
    
@Stephan202: increasing n (interviewees) is a good thing for me, because I look like I'm accomplishing something at work, plus in this economy it's easy to extort candidates and make them pay for lunch and stuff. –  MusiGenesis Jul 17 '09 at 16:21
    
And another downvote! The gift that keeps on pissing off! –  MusiGenesis Aug 2 '09 at 0:29

17 -- a very common question

-> 1-2 = 2
<- 2 = 2
-> 5,10 = 10 (none of them has to return)
<- 1 = 1
-> 1,2 = 2

all on the other side
total = 2+2+10+1+2 = 17

usually people get it as 19 in the first try

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Opps. someone already did it, i type slow :D. anyways, the solution is standard and its a very standard puzzle. –  Vivek Sharma Jul 17 '09 at 16:07
    
Even I know the solution. But looking for a generalized solution for these kind of problems. Anyway good try. –  Ganesh M Jul 17 '09 at 16:10

An exhaustive search of all possibilities is simple with such a small problem space. Breadth or depth first would work. It is a simple CS problem.

I prefer the missionary and cannibal problems myself

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As per Wikipedia

The puzzle is known to have appeared as early as 1981, in the book Super Strategies For Puzzles and Games. In this version of the puzzle, A, B, C and D take 5, 10, 20, and 25 minutes, respectively, to cross, and the time limit is 60 minutes

This question was however popularized after its appearance in the book "How Would You Move Mount Fuji?"

the question can be generalized for N people with varying individual time taken to cross the bridge.

The below program works for a generic N no of people and their times.

class Program
{
    public static int TotalTime(List<int> band, int n)
    {
        if (n < 3)
        {
            return band[n - 1];
        }
        else if (n == 3)
        {
            return band[0] + band[1] + band[2];
        }
        else
        {
            int temp1 = band[n - 1] + band[0] + band[n - 2] + band[0];
            int temp2 = band[1] + band[0] + band[n - 1] + band[1];

            if (temp1 < temp2)
            {
                return temp1 + TotalTime(band, n - 2);
            }
            else if (temp2 < temp1)
            {
                return temp2 + TotalTime(band, n - 2);
            }
            else
            {
                return temp2 + TotalTime(band, n - 2);
            }
        }
    }

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        // change the no of people crossing the bridge
        // add or remove corresponding time to the list
        int n = 4; 

        List<int> band = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 5, 10 };

        band.Sort();

        Console.WriteLine("The total time taken to cross the bridge is: " + Program.TotalTime(band, n));
        Console.ReadLine();
    }
}

OUTPUT:

The total time taken to cross the bridge is: 17

For,

int n = 5; 
List<int> band = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 5, 10, 12 };

OUTPUT:

The total time taken to cross the bridge is: 25

For,

int n = 4; 
List<int> band = new List<int>() { 5, 10, 20, 25 };

OUTPUT The total time taken to cross the bridge is: 60

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I mapped out the possible solutions algebraically and came out the with the fastest time . and assigning algebra with the list of A,B,C,D where A is the smallest and D is the biggest the formula for the shortest time is B+A+D+B+B or 3B+A+D or in wordy terms, the sum of second fastest times 3 and add with the Most Fastest and Most Slowest.

looking at the program there was also a question of increased items. Although I haven't gone through it, but I am guessing the formula still applies, just add till all items with the second item times 3 and sum of everything except 2nd slowest times. e.g. since 4 items are 3 x second + first and fourth. then 5 items are 3 x second + first, third and fifth. would like to check this out using the program.

also i just looked at the pdf shared above, so for more items it is the sum of 3 x second + fastest + sum of slowest of each subsequent pair.

looking at the steps for the optimized solution, the idea is -right - for two items going to the right the fastest is 1st and 2nd fastest , -left - then plus the fastest going back for a single item is the fastest item -right - bring the slowest 2 items, which will account for only the slowest item and disregard the second slowest. -left - the 2nd fastest item. -final right - the 1st and 2nd fastest again

so again summing up = 2nd fastest goes 3 times, fastest goes once, and slowest goes with 2nd slowest.

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