Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a C code that works in the following way: the header contains a declaration for the function, say:

typedef struct MyStruct
{
    int thing;
    void* reserved;
} MyStruct;

void foo(MyStruct* bar);

And then, in my .c code, I have this:

typedef struct EXTENDED
{
    float more_stuff;
} EXTENDED;

struct MyStructEx
{
    int thing;
    EXTENDED* ex;
} MyStructEx;

void foo(MyStructEx* bar)
{
    ...
}

This compiles fine under MSVC (with warnings telling me that the header and implementation parameters don't match) but Code::Blocks (GCC) throws an error on it. Is there a way to silence this error or at least make it a warning, or is my only option to put the extra definitions in the header as well?

I'm doing this because I'm coding a modular library in C, so sometimes the individual components require "scratch space" to work (which is the void* reserved in the header), and to avoid having a bunch of casts everywhere I'm trying to implicitly cast the general-purpose MyStruct structure to a more specialized one.

So my question is, which option should I use to change this sort of error into a warning, and/or is there a better way to achieve this? (I am required to use standard C).

share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Keep the function prototype and cast the pointer in the function definition

typedef struct EXTENDED
{
    float more_stuff;
} EXTENDED;

struct MyStructEx
{
    int thing;
    EXTENDED* ex;
} MyStructEx;

void foo(MyStruct* bar)
{
    MyStructEx *mse = (MyStructEx*)bar;
    ...
}

It will shut the compiler.

share|improve this answer
    
That requires having an additional pointer in the implementation though, it would be optimized away but it isn't very elegant to read. Valid solution if all else fails though. –  Thomas Jul 11 '12 at 22:42

There is no implicit conversion between MyStruct* and MyStructEx*.

(A terminology quibble: there's no such thing as an "implicit cast". A cast is an explicit conversion, using the cast operator, which consists of a parenthesized type name.)

There's also no guarantee that void* and EXTENDED* have the same size and representation; it would be perfectly legal, for example, for void* to be 8 bytes and EXTENDED* to be 4 bytes.

Any technique that assumes MyStruct and MyStructEx have the same layout is going to cause your program's behavior to be undefined.

It seems like the foo function that takes a MyStruct* and the foo function that takes a MyStructEx* need to be two different functions, with two different names. One of them can be a wrapper for the other.

Either that, or you could drop the MyStructEx type and use MyStruct for everything, with foo() doing any necessary conversions.

share|improve this answer
    
"There's also no guarantee that void* and EXTENDED* have the same size and representation" How so? They are both pointers, aren't pointers always the same size in a given process? I'm confused. "Either that, or you could drop the MyStructEx type and use MyStruct for everything, with foo() doing any necessary conversions." Yes that is a last option. –  Thomas Jul 11 '12 at 22:46
    
@Thomas C is a programming language that has abstractions, including types. It is not an assembler language where a variable declaration inevitable implies pushing the stackpointer and where a pointer is just a number. –  Johannes Schaub - litb Jul 11 '12 at 22:48
    
@Thomas: There's no guarantee about anything for pointers, except that all pointers can be converted to void * and back. –  Kerrek SB Jul 11 '12 at 22:48
    
@KerrekSB: Actually there's a guarantee that all struct pointers have the same representation, as do all union pointers (this is useful for pointers to incomplete types). Also, void* has the same representation as char*, unsigned char*, and signed char*. There's also a guarantee that round-trip function pointer conversion yields the original value. (None of these guarantees are directly helpful here.) –  Keith Thompson Jul 11 '12 at 22:53
    
@KeithThompson: Thanks - the void* and char* correspondence is particularly useful to know. Do you have the reference for that? –  Kerrek SB Jul 11 '12 at 23:02

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.