Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a python statistical package that supports the computation of weighted covariance (i.e., each observation has a weight) ? Unfortuantely numpy.cov does not support weights.

Preferably working under numpy/scipy framework (i.e., able to use numpy arrays to speed up the computation).

Thanks a lot!

share|improve this question
    
    
statsmodels almost has it –  user333700 Jul 12 '12 at 21:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I wanted to say statsmodels has it, but checking it, I found that it has a bug. https://github.com/statsmodels/statsmodels/issues/370 I don't know of anyone ever using it (including myself).

But we can still calculate it directly, until this is fixed in statsmodels.

# -*- coding: utf-8 -*-
"""descriptive statistic with case weights

Author: Josef Perktold
"""

import numpy as np
from statsmodels.stats.weightstats import DescrStatsW


np.random.seed(987467)
x = np.random.multivariate_normal([0, 1.], [[1., 0.5], [0.5, 1]], size=20)
weights = np.random.randint(1, 4, size=20)

xlong = np.repeat(x, weights, axis=0)

ds = DescrStatsW(x, weights=weights)

print 'cov bug'
print ds.cov  #BUG

self = ds  #alias to use copied expression
ds_cov = np.dot(self.weights * self.demeaned.T, self.demeaned) / self.sum_weights

print '\nddof=0'
print ds_cov
print np.cov(xlong.T, bias=1)

ds_cov0 = np.dot(self.weights * self.demeaned.T, self.demeaned) / \
              (self.sum_weights - 1)
print '\nddof=1'
print ds_cov0
print np.cov(xlong.T, bias=0)

prints:

cov bug
[[ 0.21577595  0.03563907]
 [ 0.03563907  0.35826816]]

ddof=0
[[ 0.43671986  0.06551506]
 [ 0.06551506  0.66281218]]
[[ 0.43671986  0.06551506]
 [ 0.06551506  0.66281218]]

ddof=1
[[ 0.44821249  0.06723914]
 [ 0.06723914  0.68025461]]
[[ 0.44821249  0.06723914]
 [ 0.06723914  0.68025461]]
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.