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I need to grep for data contained in an XML file. There are multiple elements I need to get, and the last is inside a node. There is a bunch of data in between the elements I'm grepping through. I can easily grep for the multiple elements like so:

grep -E "<first|<second|<third|<seventh" file.xml

But since I have a file structure that looks like this:

<first>First</first>
<second>Second</second>
<third>Third</third>
<fourth>Fourth</fourth>
<fifth>Fifth</fifth>
<sixth flexible="true">
    <low>0.09</low>
    <high>5.90</high>
</sixth>
<seventh flexible="false">
    <low>1.82</low>
    <high>3.14</high>
</seventh>

I'm not getting the numerical data inside the <seventh> node (didn't expect to with that command). So I'm trying to use the grep -An (after) switch, where "n" is the number of lines to match after the initial match, to get the rest of the seventh node:

grep -E "<first" -E "<second" -E "<third" -E -A3 "<seventh" file.xml

Which would return:

<first>First</first>
<second>Second</second>
<third>Third</third>
<seventh flexible="false">
    <low>1.82</low>
    <high>3.14</high>
</seventh>

Which I could then massage to get my end result (really only need the "high" data from the seventh node along with it's associated 1st, 2nd, & 3rd strings). However, that's not working, I'm getting the first three elements immediately after <first and it ignores the rest of the command.

I've also tried:

grep -E "<first|<second|<third" -E -A3 "<seventh" file.xml

Which gives me sort of similar results, but completely ignores the "-E -A3 "<seventh" part of the command. Well, I guess not ignores, because the -A3 is still being applied backwards to the previous parts of the command. I understand that you can use post-command switches, but can you control how far back they go?

I read through the man page on grep and didn't see how I could chain the command together. I'm using a Mac if that's important, but have easy access to Linux & Windows boxes if need be.

How can I get the data I want?

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2 Answers 2

First of all, please look through man grep again and see that multiple -E is not needed and multiple patterns are not expected by grep.

Second, if you know that you need context for seventh but not others, simply use two commands:

$ grep -E '<first|<second|<third' file.xml; grep -A3 '<seventh' file.xml
<first>First</first>
<second>Second</second>
<third>Third</third>
<seventh flexible="false">
    <low>1.82</low>
    <high>3.14</high>
</seventh>

If you actually don't know that, then it would be better to use xpath or another xml-parsing tool.

See also this question.

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thanks for the help, but your solution doesn't work to give me the data I'm looking for. Your & Michael's suggestion of xpath looks like a good way to have solved the problem. As it was, I did a brute force grep & sed script to get the data into a manageable state. Something like this: grep -E -A3 "<first|<second|<third|<seventh" file.xml | sed -e 's/<fourth.*fourth>//' -e 's/<fifth.*fifth>//' -e 's/<sixth.*sixth>//' -e 's/^[ \t]*//' -e '/^.*$/s' Since I got the 3 lines after each search term, I got way too much data and used sed to clean it up. This worked OK so I could move on. –  delliottg Jul 13 '12 at 16:46

Don't use regular expressions to search XML. They aren't designed for the job. Your code will be wrong. For example, the code given by @Levitsky will fail if certain strings appear inside comments or CDATA sections, or if the input contains an element called <firstly>, or if the newlines are arranged differently. (Sometimes it doesn't matter to have code that's wrong, in the sense of only working 99% of the time, but if that's your requirement I would expect you to say so.)

The way to search XML is using XPath, or for more elaborate searches, XQuery.

The XPath solution to your requirement is dead simple. Assuming the XML you give is inside a wrapper element, the XPath 2.0 expression is wrapper/(first, second, third, seventh). So XPath for this task is not only more reliable, it is also much easier.

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Thanks for the help. Xpath is very viable, but since I wasn't using an XML parser, the XML example I used was over simplified compared to the real XML. I experimented with it yesterday and got results out of the real XML, but I was only able to get serialized data out (EG all of the <first> node data followed by all of the <second> node data, etc.), not associative data: code <first>First</first> <second>Second</second> <third>Third</third> <seventh flexible="false"> <low>1.82</low> <high>3.14</high> </seventh> Using commas gave me an "Invalid token: ," token error. –  delliottg Jul 13 '12 at 16:35

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