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I have searched the web in attempt to work this problem out but to no luck. This is also my first SQL question on SO :-)

I am but a simple man with simple queries - allow me to demonstrate

select asy.aim_student_id, ast.aim_test  
from aim_student_test ast
  join aim_student_absent asa on (asa.aps_yr = ast.aps_yr and asa.aim_test = ast.aim_test and asa.aim_id = ast.aim_id)
  --join aim_student_qst asq on (asq.aps_yr = ast.aps_yr and asq.aim_test = ast.aim_test and asq.aim_id = ast.aim_id)
  join aim_student_yr asy on (asy.aps_yr = ast.aps_yr and asy.aim_student_yr_id = ast.aim_student_yr_id)
    where ast.aps_yr = '2012'

As you can see - join aim_student_qst is commented out.

aim_student_qst is a table that lists responses by a student to all questions. So one student would have ~50 cases in this table. To test what was slowing my query I simply commented out the joining of aim_student_qst and sure enough my query sped right up.

I assume that what Oracle is doing is going - oh you want those tables, let's put them into one big table and THEN look for what exactly we want. Which is why my query is slower despite not doing anything else with aim_student_qst. Is this correct?

For my purposes I only need to select one question for each student, rather than all 50, for example. Is there a way to do this?

Thankyou!!!!!

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1  
I think your assumptions are incorrect. It makes no sense to me why you would join to a table of answers for a particular student, and that join would not include the aim_sudent_id in the join. Probably what is actually happening is your creating a huge join of unrelated rows. –  gview Jul 12 '12 at 0:56
    
Bizarrely, there are two unique IDs for each student. One of them is aim_student_id, the other is aim_id. As you can see, aim_id is used to join to aim_student_qst. Also, what I forgot to mention is that without the join to aim_student_qst. The run time was 9.34 secs, and with the join it was 547.698 secs: a ratio of 1:58.64, near the number of questions for each student. –  nebffa Jul 12 '12 at 0:59
    
About aim_student_qst, what is the purpose of joining this table? You are neither selecting from it nor filtering on it. Do you need to limit results to students that exist in this table? Is aim_student_qst.aim_id indexed? –  andy holaday Jul 12 '12 at 1:31
    
First - I don't know if aim_student_qst.aim_id is indexed. How would I check such a thing? Second - the purpose of joining aim_student_qst is to select ONE question a student did and check if the response is missing –  nebffa Jul 12 '12 at 1:50
    
Ok let's put aside the index issue for a moment (too much for a comment). You want to select ONE question from asq, but the join is not limited in any way. So which "one question" do you want? Are you looking specifically for instances of any unanswered question, a particular question, the first question, a random question, etc.? –  andy holaday Jul 12 '12 at 3:11

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Maybe this then?

select asy.aim_student_id, ast.aim_test  
from aim_student_test ast
  join aim_student_absent asa on (asa.aps_yr = ast.aps_yr and asa.aim_test = ast.aim_test and asa.aim_id = ast.aim_id)
  join aim_student_qst asq on (asq.aps_yr = ast.aps_yr and asq.aim_test = ast.aim_test and asq.aim_id = ast.aim_id)
  join aim_student_yr asy on (asy.aps_yr = ast.aps_yr and asy.aim_student_yr_id = ast.aim_student_yr_id)
where ast.aps_yr = '2012'
  and asq.question_number = 1 -- column name assumed
  and asq.question_answer is NULL -- column name and value assumed
;
share|improve this answer
    
This ran super fast. Thankyou for your patience. Are there any good guides online for SQL that explain how it works behind the scenes? I feel like that would help me loads with these type of questions –  nebffa Jul 12 '12 at 5:03
1  
null and '' are the same thing in Oracle, so the or clause isn't necessary; just check for null. –  Alex Poole Jul 12 '12 at 7:16
    
@nebffa: There are several books by Tom Kyte on Oracle. For years Kyte wrote a column for DBMS magazine called "Ask Tom" and subsequently wrote some of the best books on Oracle available. He ultimately was hired by Oracle, and his Expert Oracle Database Architecture... book is what I'd recommend. –  gview Jul 12 '12 at 18:00
    
@AlexPoole right you are. Answer edited to remove the redundant check for NULL. –  andy holaday Jul 12 '12 at 20:30

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