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Is Short Circuit Evaluation guaranteed In C++ as it is in Java?
How does C++ handle &&? (Short-circuit evaluation)

I have the following struct definition and a particular use case:

struct foo
{
   bool boo;
};

int main()
{
  foo* f = 0;
   .
   .
   .
  if ((f) && (f->boo)) // <--- point of contention
   return 0
  else
   return 1;
}

Does the standard guarantee that the first set of braces in the if-statement above will always be evaluated before the second?

If it doesn't what is the best what to rewrite the above bit of code?

Currently I have the following mess:

if (f)
{
   if (f->boo)
      return 0;
   else
      return 1;
}
else
   return 1;
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marked as duplicate by Oli Charlesworth, Rob Kennedy, Crashworks, Keith Thompson, Mysticial Jul 12 '12 at 0:49

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
Yes, that's the point of short-circuiting. –  Mysticial Jul 12 '12 at 0:46
    
Please update the question so that the two code segments agree; the main() version returns 0 in the first case but the 2nd example returns 1 in the first case. –  Kevin Grant Jul 12 '12 at 0:51
    
@KevinGrant: No need to update; the question has been closed as an exact duplicate, and answer is clear. –  Keith Thompson Jul 12 '12 at 0:52
    
I want to mention two things: The first is mentioned in a link: If you overload operator&& or operator||, it will lose its short-circuit nature. The second is that & and | work, and are not short-circuited, if you desire non-short-circuited behaviour. –  chris Jul 12 '12 at 1:32
    
@chris: But & and |, when applied to integer operands are bitwise, not logical. I suppose you could cast each operand to bool if you want non-short-circuit logical "and" and "or" operators. –  Keith Thompson Jul 12 '12 at 3:05
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2 Answers 2

It may be a matter of style but you could say:

return (f && f->boo);

...or to be slightly more explicit:

return ((f && f->boo) ? 1 : 0);
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1  
You have the condition reversed. –  Keith Thompson Jul 12 '12 at 0:49
    
I was following the 2nd code segment in the original question...looks like that actually disagrees with the main() version. –  Kevin Grant Jul 12 '12 at 0:50
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Yes, it's guaranteed -- and the parentheses are unnecessary.

Both && and || are short-circuit operators; they evaluate the left operand, then evaluate the right operand only if it's needed to determine the result.

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