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I have an event handler attached to a class, as so:

$('#container').on('click', '.myClass', function (e) {...

Within this handler I want to attach a different click handler to the element that has been clicked. When the temporary handler has been clicked, I want to re-enable the original handler.

What I'm trying to do (as shown in this fiddle) is allow a section of text to be clicked, change that to an input text box, and then submit the change to recreate the text.

I've tried the following without success as found at the fiddle:

$('#container').on('click', '.submit', function (e) {
    var $this = $(this),
        new_text = $this.prev().val();
    e.stopPropagation();
    $this.parent().off('click.temp').html(new_text);                    
});

$('#container').on('click', '.test', function (e) {
    var $this = $(this);
    $this.html("<input type='text' value='" + $this.text() + "'/><input class='submit' value='Submit' type='submit'>");
    $this.on('click.temp', function (e) {
        e.stopPropagation();
    });
});

Using an .off() doesn't seem to cancel the original handler on the class because it is attached to the class not the element.

I think I've partly answered my question with e.stopPropagation(), but it's still not quite working and I'm not convinced I'm going about this the best way :)

Note: This post relates to the idea but does not use this.

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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Rather than adding and removing handlers for the inputs on the fly, I'd stick with delegated event handlers like you're already doing in the click handler that creates the inputs:

$('#container').on('click', '.test', function (e) {
    var $this = $(this);
    $this.removeClass("test")
         .html("<input type='text' value='" + $this.text() + "'/><input id='me' value='Submit' type='button'>");
});

$('#container').on('click', 'input[type="button"]', function (e) {
    var $this = $(this),
        new_text = $this.prev().val();
    $this.parent().addClass("test")
                  .html(new_text);
});

On click of a '.test' div replace its contents with inputs like you were doing, but also remove the "test" class so that further clicks on the div won't do anything (for the moment).

On click of a submit button change the div back to just show the text, and add the class back again so that the previous click handler takes effect again.

Note: I've changed your buttons from type="submit" to type="button" because they're not actually used to submit a form.

Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/4vmQ4/5/

share|improve this answer
    
I confess I prefer delegated event handlers. I tried using <button... but forgot about type="button"; the former creates a pretty blue button :) The id="me" is also redundant in your code (and mine, too). –  Nick Jul 12 '12 at 5:34
    
Could I not just use a class for the button? It wasn't working, but it should in theory, no? –  Nick Jul 12 '12 at 5:40
    
Yes, you could use a class if you mean you want to use that as the selector in the second .on() function, like $('#container').on('click', '.yourButtonClass', ... - of course you'd add the class in the code that creates the button. There should be no problem using a <button> element instead of <input>, in fact here's a version that does so: jsfiddle.net/4vmQ4/6. I forgot to mention that the id="me" is not only redundant since it's never used but incorrect since if you edit multiple lines at once you'll have multiple elements with the same id. –  nnnnnn Jul 12 '12 at 5:42
    
Yes, the id="me" was just a hack to try and get my original fiddle working. It wasn't picking up my class handler (and still isn't). I'm going to use your solution in practice, although I need to create a new class akin to test for the purpose :) Thanks for your help. –  Nick Jul 12 '12 at 6:02
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You can do it simply like following:

function testClick() {

    var $this = $(this),
        text = $this.text();

    // you have to off the click like this
    $('#container').off('click', '.test');

    $this.html(
        "<input class='text' type='text' value='" + text + "'/><input class='submit' value='Submit' type='submit'>"
    );

    $this.find('.submit').on('click', function(e) {
        e.stopPropagation();
        var new_text = $this.find('input.text').val();
        $this.html(new_text);
        $('#container').on('click', '.test', testClick); // again on click
    });
}

$('#container').on('click', '.test', testClick);

Working sample

You can separate the submit event like following:

function testClick() {

    var $this = $(this),
        text = $this.text();

    // you have to off the click like this
    $('#container').off('click', '.test');

    $this.html("<input class='text' type='text' value='" + text + "'/><input class='submit' value='Submit' type='submit'>");
}

$('#container').on('click', '.submit', function(e) {
    e.stopPropagation();
    var new_text = $(this).prev('input.text').val();
    $(this).parent().html(new_text);
    $('#container').on('click', '.test', testClick); // again on click
});

$('#container').on('click', '.test', testClick);

Working sample

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, this works nicely. It only allows one comment to be edited at a time, and although that's not what I had in mind, it might be better that way anyway :) –  Nick Jul 12 '12 at 5:21
    
@Nick click.testClick means a custom namaspace event and in this case I don't need that.. –  thecodeparadox Jul 12 '12 at 5:26
    
Yes, my mistake :) I realised and deleted that bit of my comment. I'm now experimenting with having the .submit handler separate to the function testClick. –  Nick Jul 12 '12 at 5:29
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I basically restructured your code so that the events are turned on and off in the same manner.

Updated Demo: http://jsfiddle.net/qZVzY/6/

Updated Code

onClickReadMode - is the event handler when the div is clicked while in read mode

onClickEditMode - is the event handler when the div is clicked while in edit mode

function onClickReadMode(_elem) {
    console.log('onClickReadMode');
    var $this = _elem, text = $this.text();
    $this.html("<input class='text' type='text' value='" + text + "'/><input class='.submit' value='Submit' type='submit'>");
    _elem.off('click.before');
    _elem.on('click.after', function() {
        onClickEditMode($(this));
    });
    _elem.find('.text').on('click.stopevent', function(e) {
        e.stopPropagation();
        return false;
    });
}

function onClickEditMode(_elem) {
    console.log('onClickEditMode');
    var $this = _elem;
    var new_text = $this.find('input').val();
    $this.html(new_text);
    _elem.off('click.after');
    _elem.on('click.before', function() {
        onClickReadMode($(this));
    });
}

$('.test').on('click.before', function (e) {
    onClickReadMode($(this));
});
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this! I streamlined the code a little so I could read it better at jsfiddle.net/dSmrN :) There's a hitch, though. Try this (on your original code): Click top comment into edit. Click bottom into edit. Submit bottom. Submit top! Submit top again!! Any ideas? –  Nick Jul 12 '12 at 5:15
    
Check out the updated demo and code! I suppose this works as intended –  techfoobar Jul 12 '12 at 5:44
    
Thanks for this. It does indeed work correctly now :) –  Nick Jul 12 '12 at 6:00
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