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There are diverse rectangles in given 1000 x 1000 arrays. in <Figure 1>, the serial “1” displayed as yellow cell is the pattern of rectangle. The minimum size of rectangle in <Figure 1> is 3 x 3 displayed as green cell.

There should be at least one of ‘0’ inside the rectangle.

But, in this array, there exists unclosed shape or straight line pattern also.

enter image description here

(The initial value of array is ‘0’, and the patterns are represented a series of ‘1’. They are not overlapped or included each other.)

What could be an efficient algorithm to find the complete regtangles in the array except unclosed shape or straight line? For example in the figure above the number of complete rectangles is 3

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I see nothing on that image (tried in IE and Opera) –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Jul 12 '12 at 6:38
5  
Try mozilla or chrome. –  Shruti Singh Jul 12 '12 at 6:40
    
Can other non-rectangle enclosed figures happen? –  Michał Górny Jul 12 '12 at 7:39
7  
Can other shapes exist? (e.g. arbitrary connected points, T shapes, etc.) Must the interior of a valid rectangle be all zeros? Can there be rectangles inside rectangles? –  Oli Charlesworth Jul 12 '12 at 7:40
3  
Can the input contain filled rectangles (all 1's) that you wouldn't want to find? Can a partial rectangle share any cells with a valid rectangle? –  Nate Kohl Jul 12 '12 at 12:16
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5 Answers

This is quite simple. If you have n squares, you can count the rectangles in O(n).

Assumptions:

  • The borders of each valid rectangle don't share any cells with a non-valid path.
  • If one rectangle is inside another, you would be happy finding them

You would need extra memory as big as the input. Let's call this visited and initialize with 0.

Let's first construct a helper function:

is_rectangle(square s)
    from s, go right while you see 1s and visited is 0
        mark them as 1 in visited
    if less than 3 steps
        return 0
    then, go down while you see 1s and visited is 0
        mark them as 1 in visited
    if less than 3 steps
        return 0
    then, go left while you see 1s and visited is 0
        mark them as 1 in visited
    if less than 3 steps
        return 0
    then, go up while you see 1s and visited is 0
        mark them as 1 in visited
    if then one above is not s
        return 0
    return 1

This function basically traces the 1s in the directions of right-down-left-up and checks if the conditions are met (length at least 3 and reaching the starting position). It also marks the visited squares.

The important thing to notice about this function, is that it works correctly only if the initial square is the top-left corner.

Now, the solution to the problem is easy:

num_rectangles = 0
initialize visited to 0 (rows x columns)
for r in rows
    for c in columns
        if visitied[r][c] or image[r][c] == 0
            continue
        num_rectangles += is_rectangle(<r,c>)
return num_rectangles

Here is how the algorithm executes:

enter image description here
1. Failed (and marked) part of a bad rectangle

enter image description here
2. Found (and marked) a rectangle.

enter image description here
3. Failed on a single square (of a vertical line)

enter image description here
4. Failed on a single square (of a vertical line)

enter image description here
5. Failed on a single square (of a vertical line)

enter image description here
6. After many similar steps, found the next rectangle.

enter image description here
7. And the next rectangle

enter image description here
8. Algorithm end

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I like this, but depending on how bad the input is, when you realize that a rectangle is only partially complete, you might need to go back and remove its cells from the visited array. –  Nate Kohl Jul 12 '12 at 12:12
    
@NateKohl, on the contrary! Given the conditions of the problem, keeping them as visited helps skip future non-rectangles. –  Visa is Racism Jul 12 '12 at 13:16
    
@NateKohl, ok I see what you mean. I added an assumption that says your comment on the question cannot happen (so rectangles don't share border with non-rectangles) –  Visa is Racism Jul 12 '12 at 13:18
    
This will fail if, say, the top edge of the rectangle "extends past" its right edge, which is a valid input because it's equivalent to having a horizontal line segment that begins at the square immediately to the right of the top edge of the rectangle. O(n) algorithms that don't fail on this input are possible. –  j_random_hacker Jul 12 '12 at 14:20
    
@j_random_hacker, since the OP is not responsive to our questions of whether such cases exist or not, I have assumed (my first assumption on the top of the post) such a case doesn't happen. –  Visa is Racism Jul 12 '12 at 14:23
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The following O(n) algorithm will work on any 2D matrix of 0/1 values (that is, intersecting/overlapping rectangles are allowed, as are arbitrary non-rectangular open/closed shapes). The definition of a rectangle I'm using here is "the interior is entirely made up of 0-cells" (so e.g. if one rectangle entirely contains another, only the inner rectangle will be found; if containing rectangles should also be considered, then each found rectangle can be deleted and the algorithm restarted). It's based on the observation that each 0-cell can be in the interior of at most one 1-rectangle.

I use the convention that x = 0 is the leftmost position and y = 0 is the topmost position.

  1. Find the top-left corner. Starting at the top-left cell and proceeding left-to-right and top-to-bottom, find the next unvisited cell that could be the top-left corner of a solid-0 rectangle: specifically it must be a 0-cell that has 1-cell neighbours in the SW, W, NW, N and NE positions, and 0-cells in the remaining 3 neighbouring positions.
  2. Find the top-right corner. Scan through neighbours to its right while these cells are 0 and have a 1-cell N neighbour.
  3. Could this be the top row of a solid 0-rectangle? If the the last cell found by the above loop before it ends is a cell that could be the top-right cell in a solid-0 rectangle (specifically a 0-cell having 1-cell neighbours in the NW, N, NE, E and SE cells, and 0-cells in the remaining 3 positions), then we have established both the top y co-ordinate and the exact width of the only possible solid 0-rectangle that uses any of these cells. If the last cell doesn't meet these top-right-corner conditions, then none of these cells can be part of a solid 0-rectangle: mark them visited and goto 1.
  4. Call the start and end x co-ordinates of the strip of 0-cells x1 and x2; call the vertical position y1.
  5. Scan down, a row at at time. Set y2 = y1, and while the line between x1 and x2 at vertical position y2 could be part of the solid 0-rectangle, increment y2. Specifically, the test at each vertical position y2 is: the cells at (x1 - 1, y2) and (x2 + 1, y2) must both be 1, and all cells in between must be 0.
  6. Could this be the bottom row of a solid 0-rectangle? If the last row found by the previous loop before it ends is a row that could be the bottom row of a solid 0-rectangle (specifically there are 1-cells all the way from (x1 - 1, y2 + 1) to (x2 + 1, y2 + 1)), then we have found a complete solid 0-rectangle surrounded by 1-cells: if its size is greater than the biggest discovered so far, then record it as the new biggest rectangle. Otherwise (if there is not a solid row of 1-cells in the next line down), none of the 0-cells examined can be part of any solid 0-rectangle: mark them all as visited and goto 1.
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If you can have only rectangular shapes in your array, it is equivalent to a classic problem of computation on binary images: just apply a standard algorithm for connected components. You label only connected components of 0's, and count them.

See http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Connected-component_labeling for example. This type of algorithm is quite simple on images but take some amount of memory (same size as your input array, of type short or int). Be careful of connectivity: if you choose 4-connectivity, you will count enclosed rectangles even if some corners are missing. But the algorithm is simpler than with 8-connectivity.

If you can have more complex enclosed shapes, just add a post-processing: for each connected component, count the number of pixels inside the bounding box of the component (if the two numbers are equal, you have a rectangle)

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1  
+1, this works. But "connexity"? shudder Please say "connectivity" (and "label" instead of "labellize"). –  j_random_hacker Jul 12 '12 at 15:07
    
Sorry for my vocabulary mistakes. Thanks for correcting me. –  Bentoy13 Jul 12 '12 at 16:25
    
+1. When I read the problem description, the connected-component algorithm came immediately to mind. –  Daniel Pryden Jul 13 '12 at 0:43
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Thought about it a while. I came up with this method:

1) eliminate all zeroes around the edges - change their value to 2

2) flood fill the matrix around the 2s

this leaves you with only island of zeros, which can now be tested for convexness. So for each island:

3) look for extent of 0 value in X and Y - give you a potential inner rect

4) if inner rect contains a 1 OR outer rect contains a 0, flood fill this island with 2s as it is not convex (hence not a rectangle)

Assuming you can find a good flood fill algorithm (not like mine), this should be efficient at cutting the search space quickly.

And now for the code (sorry it's C sharp):

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;

namespace Test
{
class MainClass
{
    static private int [,] matrix = new int[,] {
        {0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0},
        {0,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,0,0,1,0,1,0},
        {0,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,0,0,1,0,1,0},
        {0,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,0,0,1,0,1,0},
        {0,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,0,0,0,0,1,0},
        {0,1,0,0,0,0,1,0,1,0,0,0,0,1,0},
        {0,1,1,1,1,1,1,0,1,0,0,1,0,1,0},
        {0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0},
        {0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0},
        {0,0,1,0,0,1,0,0,1,1,1,0,1,1,0},
        {0,0,1,1,1,1,0,0,1,0,1,0,0,0,0},
        {0,0,0,0,0,0,0,0,1,1,1,0,0,0,0}
    };

    static private int width = matrix.GetLength(0);
    static private int height = matrix.GetLength(1);

    private const int DEAD = 2;
    private const int RECT = 3;

    public static void Main (string[] args)
    {
        //width = matrix.GetLength(0);
        //height = matrix.GetLength(1);

        PrintMatrix ();
        EliminateFromEdges (DEAD);
        PrintMatrix ();
        FloodFill (DEAD); // very inefficient - find a better floodfill algorithm
        PrintMatrix ();

        // test each island of zeros for convexness
        for (int i = 0; i < width; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < height; j++) {
                if (matrix[i,j] == 0)
                {
                    if (TestIsland(i,j) == false)
                    {
                        // eliminate this island as it is not convex
                        matrix[i,j] = DEAD;
                        FloodFill(DEAD);
                        PrintMatrix ();
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        // flag this rectangle as such
                        matrix[i,j] = RECT;
                        FloodFill(RECT);
                        PrintMatrix ();
                    }
                }
            }
        }

        // We're done, anything flagged as RECT can be expanded to yield the rectangles
        PrintMatrix ();
    }

    // flag any zero at edge of matrix as 'dead'
    static private void EliminateFromEdges(int value)
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < width; i++) 
        {
            if (matrix [i, 0] == 0) 
            {
                matrix [i, 0] = value;
            }
            if (matrix [i, height - 1] == 0)
            {
                matrix [i, height - 1] = value;
            }
        }
        for (int j = 1; j < height - 1; j++)
        {
            if (matrix [0, j] == 0)
            {
                matrix [0, j] = value;
            }
            if (matrix [width - 1, j] == 0)
            {
                matrix [width - 1, j] = value;
            }
        }
    }

    // propagte a value to neighbouring cells
    static private void FloodFill (int value)
    {
        bool change_made = true; // set to true to start things off
        while (change_made) {
            change_made = false;
            for (int i = 1; i < width - 1; i++) {
                for (int j = 1; j < height - 1; j++) {
                    if ((matrix [i, j] == 0) &&
                        ((matrix [i - 1, j] == value) || 
                        (matrix [i + 1, j] == value) ||
                        (matrix [i, j - 1] == value) || 
                        (matrix [i, j + 1] == value))) {
                        matrix [i, j] = value;
                        change_made = true;
                    }
                }
            }
        }
    }

    static private bool TestIsland (int x, int y)
    {
        // find convex extend of island
        int x2 = x;
        int y2 = y;
        while (matrix[++x2, y] == 0);
        x2--;
        while (matrix[x,++y2] == 0);
        y2--;

        // check inner cells (want all zeroes)
        for (int i = x; i <= x2; i++) 
        {
            for (int j = y; j <= y2; j++) 
            {
                if (matrix[i,y] != 0)
                {
                    return false;
                }
            }
        }

        // check surrounding cells (want all ones)
        x--; y--;
        x2++; y2++;
        for (int i = x; i <= x2; i++) 
        {
            if ((matrix[i,y] != 1) || (matrix[i,y2] != 1))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }
        for (int j = y + 1; j <= y2 - 1; j++) 
        {
            if ((matrix[x,j] != 1) || (matrix[x2,j] != 1))
            {
                return false;
            }
        }

        return true;
    }

    // for debug purposes
    static private void PrintMatrix ()
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < width; i++) {
            for (int j = 0; j < height; j++) {
                switch(matrix[i,j])
                {
                case DEAD:
                    Console.Write("-");
                    break;
                case RECT:
                    Console.Write("+");
                    break;
                default:
                    Console.Write(matrix[i,j]);
                    break;
                }
            }
            Console.WriteLine();
        }
        Console.WriteLine();
    }
}
}

The output of this code

000000001111000
011111101001010
010000101001010
010000101001010
010000101000010
010000101000010
011111101001010
000000001111000
001111000000000
001001001110110
001111001010000
000000001110000

--------1111---
-1111110100101-
-1000010100101-
-1000010100101-
-1000010100001-
-1000010100001-
-1111110100101-
-0000000111100-
-0111100000000-
-0100100111011-
-0111100101000-
--------111----

--------1111---
-111111-1--1-1-
-100001-1--1-1-
-100001-1--1-1-
-100001-1----1-
-100001-1----1-
-111111-1--1-1-
--------1111---
--1111---------
--1001--111-11-
--1111--101----
--------111----

--------1111---
-111111-1--1-1-
-1++++1-1--1-1-
-1++++1-1--1-1-
-1++++1-1----1-
-1++++1-1----1-
-111111-1--1-1-
--------1111---
--1111---------
--1001--111-11-
--1111--101----
--------111----

--------1111---
-111111-1--1-1-
-1++++1-1--1-1-
-1++++1-1--1-1-
-1++++1-1----1-
-1++++1-1----1-
-111111-1--1-1-
--------1111---
--1111---------
--1++1--111-11-
--1111--101----
--------111----

--------1111---
-111111-1--1-1-
-1++++1-1--1-1-
-1++++1-1--1-1-
-1++++1-1----1-
-1++++1-1----1-
-111111-1--1-1-
--------1111---
--1111---------
--1++1--111-11-
--1111--1+1----
--------111----

--------1111---
-111111-1--1-1-
-1++++1-1--1-1-
-1++++1-1--1-1-
-1++++1-1----1-
-1++++1-1----1-
-111111-1--1-1-
--------1111---
--1111---------
--1++1--111-11-
--1111--1+1----
--------111----
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"find another 1 at least 2 away in both X and Y"? It could be any cell, and finding the right one efficiently is really what the question is! –  j_random_hacker Jul 12 '12 at 14:26
    
I did not say pick another 1 at random! You look for candidate in order by row, then columns. You can significantly cut the search space since you know that there can't be a 1 inside the rectangle. Each failed candidate 1 allow you to skip the remainder of a row. Moreover if S2 > 0, you can move on the the next cell in the main loop. –  zeFrenchy Jul 12 '12 at 18:52
    
I think it could be even simpler. You flood the array with ones. This way the remaining zeroes marks the desired areas. In postprocess you would just increase the borders by 1 to get the original shape. –  jnovacho Jul 17 '12 at 20:25
    
So long as only 1 and 0 are allowed .... Then your simplification is genius! –  zeFrenchy Jul 17 '12 at 23:31
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This is what I think, could be pretty resource inefficient. Don't know about that.

  1. Traverse along a row unless you find a at least 3 1s.
  2. Traverse down and do boolean & operation with the rows below --> they should result in the format of 100..001 if it is a valid rectangle. (Assuming you can do all the boolean operations)
  3. You have found a rectangle when you have found at least one row in step 2, and finally all 1s.
  4. Repeat with the next element of the row!
share|improve this answer
    
Why use boolean AND? Why not just compare each row for equality with 100..001? Also what if there is a horizontal line segment extending to the left of the top edge of a rectangle? –  j_random_hacker Jul 12 '12 at 15:13
    
@j_random_hacker Yes. Comparison can also be done. Its the same thing anyways. And I had assumed that there is no 'extension' kind of thing. –  gaganbm Jul 13 '12 at 7:09
    
The "extension" is equivalent to a horizontal line segment beginning just to the right of the rectangle's top edge, which AFAICT is allowed by the OP's constraints. –  j_random_hacker Jul 13 '12 at 7:29
    
@j_random_hacker Hmm. Got your point. In such a situation, we need some more check points and constraints. –  gaganbm Jul 13 '12 at 7:36
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