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I am developing an enterprise application with an Oracle backend. I am designing a core part of the DB architecture now and im having some questions on it.

  1. First and most important thing is, most of my tables needs to preserve old data. For example

Consider a table with the fields

Contract No, Contract Name, Contract Person, Contract Email

I have a records like

12, xxx, yyy, xxx@zzz.ccc

and some one modifies it to

12, xxx, zzz, xxx@zzz.ccc

at any point of time i need to display the new record while still have copy of the old record.

So what i thought was to put a duplicate record of the old data and update the fields that was changed and have a flag to keep track of active records with something like "is active" as 1.

The downside is that this creates redundancy in the table and seems like a bad design. But any other model seems unnecessarily complex and this seems cleaner to me. Also i dont see any performance issues having a duplicate record too. So please let me know if this is ok or am i missing something here.

  1. Some times where there is a one to many relationship my assumption is to have a mapping table where i map the multiple entity in individual records by repeating master ID and changing child ID in each record. Is this a right way to do it or is there a better way to do it.

  2. Is there a book on database best practices.

Thanks.

The database im dealing with is Oracle 11g on a two node RAC cluster

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Also i dont see any performance issues having a duplicate record too.

Assume you have a row that, over time, has 15 updates to it. If you don't store any temporal data (if you don't store different versions of the row), you end up storing one row. If you do store temporal data, you end up storing 15 rows.

You also need more indexes, because the id number is no longer sufficient to identify a single row.

If you have only relatively small tables, you probably won't see any performance difference. (There will be one, but it probably won't be noticeable to users.) But a table that has 10 million rows will perform differently than a table that has 150 million rows. (15 versions per row, times 10 million rows.)

Some times where there is a one to many relationship my assumption is to have a mapping table where i map the multiple entity in individual records by repeating master ID and changing child ID in each record. Is this a right way to do it or is there a better way to do it.

You probably need to know which child rows belong to which parent rows. So you need more than a single master id for the key. The master id alone doesn't tell you which version of that row in the parent table applies to a given child row.

Is there a book on database best practices.

There are books on temporal databases. The first one that I know of is Snodgrass's Developing Time-Oriented Database Applications in SQL. It's available in several formats, and it's free. It's also kind of old, but the information in it is important to understand if you're going to be building a temporal database. Also, think about reading Date's book Temporal Data and the Relational Model.

Wikipedia has an article that summarizes the ideas behind temporal databases.

Is normalization completely mandatory.

That's a meaningless question. You will have different issues with tables normalized to 2NF than you'll have with tables normalized to 5NF or 6NF.

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Ok apologies for getting carried away with the last question. So if there is 150 million rows where it should have actually been 10 million rows, then there will be a performance hit. so can we have another table where in we move the old data, and have the active rows only in the active table – swordfish Jul 12 '12 at 11:28
    
Now you're talking about doubling the number of tables. Referential constraints are a problem. What row does a row in the old child table reference? Does it reference a row in the active parent table or a row in the old parent table? Selecting the two most recent rows--a common query when you're trying to figure out why something appears broken--requires either a UNION between the active table and the inactive table, or doubling the number of columns you'd normally return. – Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jul 12 '12 at 11:53
    
This is my solution, if there is a table called "policies" i will have another table called "policies_history". Now whenever i do an update i will first take the entire row insert it in the table history table with a reference to the primary key of the policies table and update the record in the policies table. This way i will not lose any key reference as i am only updating the original table and putting the older data into the history table and if i want to query the last 5 changes i made i can still get it. How does this sound? – swordfish Jul 15 '12 at 6:10
    
Sounds like policies_history is your first idea (one table has a row for every change), plus another table (policies) for the current rows. Did you consider using Oracle Workspace Manager? – Mike Sherrill 'Cat Recall' Jul 15 '12 at 11:23

I would keep the old/history records in a separate table. Create an upd/del trigger to populate your audit/history table for you, and keep only the most current data in your main table.

See here for an example. Many other similar examples exists in SO.

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