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i need a report from a database where i need the final result like Number of Male, Number of Female, showing against city and finally against State. I started off with something like.

SELECT     p.StateName,  d.CityName,
 count(api.Gender) as Gender
FROM       dbo.Application_Personal_information as api INNER JOIN
           dbo.state as p ON api.State = p.ID INNER JOIN
           dbo.City as d ON api.City= d.ID
           group by p.StateName, d.CityName

when i do this

   SELECT     p.StateName,  d.CityName,
     count(api.Gender = 'Male) as Male,
     count(api.Gender = 'Female) as Female,
    FROM       dbo.Application_Personal_information as api INNER JOIN
               dbo.state as p ON api.State = p.ID INNER JOIN
               dbo.City as d ON api.City= d.ID
               group by p.StateName, d.CityName

it give's me error. incorrect syntax near =. i also tried with select statement

 COUNT(select api.Gender from api where api.Gender ='Male') as Male,

But it is also not working. ... Any idea?

share|improve this question
    
See answer below: if you need the output to be exactly as you showed it, it's slightly more tricky. –  BonyT Jul 12 '12 at 7:32

2 Answers 2

SELECT     
    p.StateName,  d.CityName, 
    sum(case when Gender ='Male' then 1 else 0 end ) as Male_count,
    sum(case when Gender ='Female' then 1 else 0 end ) as Female_count

FROM
    dbo.Application_Personal_information as api INNER JOIN 
    dbo.state as p ON api.State = p.ID INNER JOIN 
    dbo.City as d ON api.City= d.ID 
group by 
    p.StateName, d.CityName
share|improve this answer
    
This works too - but I suspect it will be much slower - speed may not be an issue here though. –  BonyT Jul 12 '12 at 7:40
    
SUM(Gender ='Male') works too in MySQL (because TRUE is 1 and FALSE is 0) –  ypercube Jul 12 '12 at 7:48
    
Thats good ypercube. But it is more generic to MySQL and sometimes may be confuse you :) –  Madhivanan Jul 12 '12 at 7:53
    
Yes, your query is more db-agnostic. ( I really thought this was tagged with MySQL, was it?). I prefer COUNT() over SUM() but I don't think there is any performance difference: COUNT(CASE WHEN Gender ='Male' THEN 1 ELSE NULL END) –  ypercube Jul 12 '12 at 11:54
    
But won't you get warning about NULL values when you use COUNT over SUM? –  Madhivanan Jul 12 '12 at 12:24

You could try the PIVOT function if you are using SQL Server 2005 or later:

WITH CTE AS
(   SELECT  p.StateName,  
            d.CityName,
            api.Gender
    FROM    dbo.Application_Personal_information as api 
            INNER JOIN dbo.state as p 
                ON api.State = p.ID 
            INNER JOIN dbo.City as d 
                ON api.City= d.ID
)
SELECT  *
FROM    CTE
        PIVOT
        (   COUNT(Gender)
            FOR Gender IN ([Male], [Female])
        ) pvt
share|improve this answer
    
PIVOT was introduced in version 2005 :) –  Madhivanan Jul 12 '12 at 8:04
    
@Madhivanan Oops... Edited my answer. Thanks –  GarethD Jul 12 '12 at 8:30

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