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I tried to find the factorial of a large number e.g. 8785856 in a typical way using for-loop and double data type.

But it is displaying infinity as the result, may be because it is exceeding its limit.

So please guide me the way to find the factorial of a very large number.

My code:

class abc
{
    public static void main (String[]args)
    {
        double fact=1;
        for(int i=1;i<=8785856;i++)
        {
            fact=fact*i;
        }

        System.out.println(fact);
    }
}

Output:-

Infinity

I am new to Java but have learned some concepts of IO-handling and all.

share|improve this question
    
Why don't you use higher data type like BigInteger and also is this homework? If yes then tag as such. – Lion Jul 12 '12 at 7:31
    
you loop variable i is int and you are trying to store a huge number in it, try making it a double too – Shades88 Jul 12 '12 at 7:33
    
According to my calculations, it will take around 25 megabytes of memory in order to represent this number. and even then, that would be without the overheard of the BigInteger class. – Zéychin Jul 12 '12 at 7:39
    
yeah i have used biginteger as well but the compiler fails to display the answer for such a number so is there any other way out??? – Himanshu Aggarwal Jul 12 '12 at 8:03
    
What do you mean, "fails to display the answer"? Can you post the code that "failed to display the answer"? – Louis Wasserman Jul 12 '12 at 9:39
up vote 3 down vote accepted
public static void main(String[] args) {
    BigInteger fact = BigInteger.valueOf(1);
    for (int i = 1; i <= 8785856; i++)
        fact = fact.multiply(BigInteger.valueOf(i));
    System.out.println(fact);
}
share|improve this answer
    
actually i have tried this one out but i am waiting for the compiler for a long time to execute this...... – Himanshu Aggarwal Jul 12 '12 at 8:12
    
yeah you have to. and it will take lots of jvm memory also but we have no alternate as the factorial number is too big !! – manurajhada Jul 12 '12 at 8:30
    
but i waited for atleast 30-35 mins... but nothing happened.... should i wait for for time the next time i run it??? – Himanshu Aggarwal Jul 12 '12 at 8:38
    
you can increase your jvm memory – manurajhada Jul 12 '12 at 8:39
    
how can i do this??? plz tell me... – Himanshu Aggarwal Jul 12 '12 at 14:43

You might want to reconsider calculating this huge value. Wolfram Alpha's Approximation suggests it will most certainly not fit in your main memory to be displayed.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 For the link - it's COOL! – Bohemian Jul 12 '12 at 7:41
    
thanx for this link man...:-) – Himanshu Aggarwal Jul 12 '12 at 8:08
    
Unless I did the calculation wrong, it would fit into memory: log2(10^10^8) = 3.32 * 10^8 = 300M bits = 38MByte – Otto Allmendinger Jul 12 '12 at 8:30
    
thanx man.....by the way it wud be too long...it might crash.....:D – Himanshu Aggarwal Jul 12 '12 at 8:37
    
I have to say, I was too lazy to calculate the memory usage myself. Out of curiosity, does any one know what would happen if you tried to print a 38MB chunk of memory? – ThePadawan Jul 12 '12 at 14:40

Hint: Use the BigInteger class, and be prepared to give the JVM a lot of memory. The value of 8785856! is a really big number.

share|improve this answer
    
yes i have used biginteger as well but the compiler fails to display the answer for such a number so is there any other way out??? – Himanshu Aggarwal Jul 12 '12 at 8:00
    
Try increasing the heap size. – Stephen C Jul 12 '12 at 10:01

Use the class BigInteger. ( I am not sure if that will even work for such huge integers )

share|improve this answer
    
yeah i have used biginteger as well but the compiler fails to display the answer for such a number so is there any other way out??? – Himanshu Aggarwal Jul 12 '12 at 8:01
    
@HimanshuAggarwal You can try a nasty thing like writing your own multiply routine for integers. For example, you can have two big integers to represent one HUGE integer. Well, it will be complicated and cumbersome. e.g. if my integers are of size 4 bits, to represent a number like 18, I can use 2 integers : 1 and 8 with appropriate weightages. (1 with weightage 10^1 and 8 with 10^1). So if you can write a code to represent big integers in chunks of small ones with attached weightages, and write your own multiply routine, this can be done. – gaganbm Jul 12 '12 at 8:06
    
yep...so can u explain me this in a bit more detail. – Himanshu Aggarwal Jul 12 '12 at 8:09
    
That was 10^0 for 8, in the previous comment. For multiplication, you have to take care of all the weightages and so on. It will be slow. Very slow. And the concept is loosely based on WallaceTree. – gaganbm Jul 12 '12 at 8:14
    
okay..... but this is definitely going to be cumbersome..... by the way thanx for this explanation... i'll try to implement this method as well...:-) – Himanshu Aggarwal Jul 12 '12 at 8:16

This blog post explains biginteger factorial in java with examples.

share|improve this answer
    
yes i have used biginteger as well but the compiler fails to display the answer for such a number..... – Himanshu Aggarwal Jul 12 '12 at 7:59

This code should work fine :-

class BigFactorial
{
    static void factorial(int n)
    {
        int res[] = new int[300];

        // Initialize result
        res[0] = 1;
        int res_size = 1;

        // Apply simple factorial formula n! = 1 * 2 * 3 * 4...*n
        for (int x=2; x<=n; x++)
            res_size = multiply(x, res, res_size);

        System.out.println("Factorial of given number is: ");
        for (int i=res_size-1; i>=0; i--)
            System.out.print(res[i]);
    }

    // This function multiplies x with the number represented by res[].
    // res_size is size of res[] or number of digits in the number represented
    // by res[]. This function uses simple school mathematics for multiplication.
    // This function may value of res_size and returns the new value of res_size
    static int multiply(int x, int res[], int res_size)
    {
        int carry = 0;  // Initialize carry

        // One by one multiply n with individual digits of res[]
        for (int i=0; i<res_size; i++)
        {
            int prod = res[i] * x + carry;
            res[i] = prod % 10;  // Store last digit of 'prod' in res[]
            carry  = prod/10;    // Put rest in carry
        }

        // Put carry in res and increase result size
        while (carry!=0)
        {
            res[res_size] = carry%10;
            carry = carry/10;
            res_size++;
        }
        return res_size;
    }

    // Driver program
    public static void main(String []args)
    {
        factorial(100);

    }

}
share|improve this answer

Infinity is a special reserved value in the Double class used when you have exceed the maximum number the a double can hold.

If you want your code to work, use the BigDecimal class, but given the input number, don't expect your program to finish execution any time soon.

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yes i have used biginteger as well but the compiler fails to display the answer for such a number so is there any other way out??? – Himanshu Aggarwal Jul 12 '12 at 8:01

The above solutions for your problem (8785856!) using BigInteger would take literally hours of CPU time if not days. Do you need the exact result or would an approximation suffice?

There is a mathematical approach called "Sterling's Approximation " which can be computed simply and fast, and the following is Gosper's improvement: enter image description here

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To really find out the factorial of this number you should use PYTHON functions , and try to open the task manager and see how much memory the compiler takes . After that you will know that how much time JVM is going to take ,as PYTHON is the best language for numerical calculations.

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