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I want to know how the linker calculate the size of .bss section?

I have a test program with two variables, one is initialazed to zero, another is initialzed to non-zero. I hope the size of .bss is is 4 and it is.

# cat test.c && gcc -o test.o -c test.c && ld -o test test.o && readelf -Ss test
int _start=0;
int a = 2;
......
Section Headers:
  [Nr] Name              Type             Address           Offset
       Size              EntSize          Flags  Link  Info  Align
  [ 1] .data             PROGBITS         00000000006000b0  000000b0
       0000000000000004  0000000000000000  WA       0     0     4
  [ 2] .bss              NOBITS           00000000006000b4  000000b4
       0000000000000004  0000000000000000  WA       0     0     4
.....
Symbol table '.symtab' contains 11 entries:
   Num:    Value          Size Type    Bind   Vis      Ndx Name
     6: 00000000006000b4     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    2 _start
    10: 00000000006000b0     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    1 a

Then I add the second zero-initialazed variable. This time I hope the size of .bss is is 8, but it is 12(0xc).

# cat test.c && gcc -o test.o -c test.c && ld -o test test.o && readelf -Ss test
int _start=0;
int a = 2;
int b = 0;
......
Section Headers:
  [Nr] Name              Type             Address           Offset
       Size              EntSize          Flags  Link  Info  Align
  [ 1] .data             PROGBITS         00000000006000b0  000000b0
       0000000000000004  0000000000000000  WA       0     0     4
  [ 2] .bss              NOBITS           00000000006000b4  000000b4
       000000000000000c  0000000000000000  WA       0     0     4
......
Symbol table '.symtab' contains 12 entries:
   Num:    Value          Size Type    Bind   Vis      Ndx Name
     6: 00000000006000b8     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    2 b
     7: 00000000006000b4     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    2 _start
    11: 00000000006000b0     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    1 a

I continue add the third zero-initialazed variable. This time I hope the size of .bss is is 12 and it is.

# cat test.c && gcc -o test.o -c test.c && ld -o test test.o && readelf -Ss test
int _start=0;
int a = 2;
int b = 0;
int c = 0;
......
Section Headers:
  [Nr] Name              Type             Address           Offset
       Size              EntSize          Flags  Link  Info  Align
  [ 0]                   NULL             0000000000000000  00000000
       0000000000000000  0000000000000000           0     0     0
  [ 1] .data             PROGBITS         00000000006000b0  000000b0
       0000000000000004  0000000000000000  WA       0     0     4
  [ 2] .bss              NOBITS           00000000006000b4  000000b4
       000000000000000c  0000000000000000  WA       0     0     4
......
Symbol table '.symtab' contains 13 entries:
   Num:    Value          Size Type    Bind   Vis      Ndx Name
     6: 00000000006000b8     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    2 b
     7: 00000000006000b4     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    2 _start
     8: 00000000006000bc     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    2 c
    12: 00000000006000b0     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    1 a

I continue add the fourth zero-initialazed variable. This time I hope the size of .bss is is 16, but it is 20(0x14).

# cat test.c && gcc -o test.o -c test.c && ld -o test test.o && readelf -Ss test
int _start=0;
int a = 2;
int b = 0;
int c = 0;
int d = 0;
......
Section Headers:
  [Nr] Name              Type             Address           Offset
       Size              EntSize          Flags  Link  Info  Align
  [ 1] .data             PROGBITS         00000000006000b0  000000b0
       0000000000000004  0000000000000000  WA       0     0     4
  [ 2] .bss              NOBITS           00000000006000b4  000000b4
       0000000000000014  0000000000000000  WA       0     0     4
......
Symbol table '.symtab' contains 14 entries:
   Num:    Value          Size Type    Bind   Vis      Ndx Name
     6: 00000000006000b8     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    2 b
     7: 00000000006000b4     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    2 _start
     8: 00000000006000bc     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    2 c
    10: 00000000006000c0     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    2 d
    13: 00000000006000b0     4 OBJECT  GLOBAL DEFAULT    1 a

Sometimes the result matches my expectation, sometime not. Is there any other factors influence the linker's output?

share|improve this question
    
Alignment maybe ? –  cnicutar Jul 12 '12 at 7:54
    
Check if the memsz of the second LOAD segment is following your expectations. –  JohnTortugo Sep 26 '12 at 18:40

1 Answer 1

It is in fact alignment. The size of the bss in your example is not 8 byte aligned as you would expect, but that's because you have 4 bytes of data. If you add another initialized variable, you will see the sizes of the bss segment be 8 byte aligned.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm not sure why you expect the 5 variables to be 16 bytes. In the 5 variables, one is initialazed with non-zero value and lays in .data, the other 4 variables are zero initialazed and lay in .bss, so I expect 16 bytes. –  yang wen Jul 12 '12 at 8:03
1  
See my revised answer, it is in fact alignment. –  Francis Upton Jul 12 '12 at 8:27

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